Avoiding Triggers

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
whosthisitsmesilly
whosthisitsmesilly

March 25th, 2006, 12:51 am #11

Ive been avoiding this trigger which is sitting at my pc to write an assignment. Ive split the time i sit and go for walks and such like . Have coffee breaks tea breaks. Its been over two weeks ive quit. I know i will never take another puff. Its not a particulary interesting assignment and i would have procrastinated in the past with cigarette smoking. Hence the avoidance of actualy sitting to get it done. I need to now coz its due for monday. I will keep this site open for reading matter and positive enforcement

I have been quit for 2 Weeks, 2 Days, 16 hours, 52 minutes and 33 seconds (16 days). I have saved £69.31 by not smoking 334 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 3 hours and 50 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 08/03/2006 00:00
Cathy
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

April 13th, 2006, 8:55 am #12

Putting off facing certain activities triggers will likely prolong the stress, anxieties and fears that you will not be able to overcome the specific situation without relapse.

All people who quit must realize that all you did as a smoker you can do as an ex-smoker too. All it takes is proving it to yourself one situation at a time.

You can continue to live your life and get through all events with your quit intact as long as you always remember to stick with your personal commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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auntvaleria
auntvaleria

April 13th, 2006, 10:43 am #13

All you did as a smoker, you can do as a ex-smoker.
All it takes is proving it to yourself one situation at a time.
One day at a time; Never take another puff!

aunt valeria

I have been quit for 1 Month, 2 Weeks, 3 Days, 2 hours, 12 minutes and 58 seconds (48 days). I have saved $132.24 by not smoking 961 cigarettes. I have saved 3 Days, 8 hours and 5 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 2/23/2006 7:30 PM
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

April 23rd, 2006, 9:09 pm #14

From above:
Putting off facing certain activities triggers will likely prolong the stress, anxieties and fears that you will not be able to overcome the specific situation without relapse.

All people who quit must realize that all you did as a smoker you can do as an ex-smoker too.

All it takes is proving it to yourself one situation at a time.

You can continue to live your life and get through all events with your quit intact as long as you always remember to stick with your personal commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Almost Island Gold
Almost Island Gold

April 24th, 2006, 6:37 am #15

Thank U Joel, Than U Freedom for such wise words. As a matter of fact I almost relapsed after having ran away from a trigger when I finally encountered it involuntarily. It is the big lesson of my quit: it's forbidden to avoid triggers forever, not even a single one. Just have to remember to Never Tave Another Puff whatever trigger is.
fernanda
Last edited by Almost Island Gold on April 10th, 2009, 12:06 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Caninegold asst
Caninegold asst

September 8th, 2006, 10:33 am #16

I have renamed my "triggers" and call even the possibility a "victory" because I can foresee, forwarn and move forward. Life is there to enjoy, not avoid. When I was thinking "trigger" it seemed harder, maybe like the word "diet"?
Just a thought.
Lianne
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Marixpress
Marixpress

September 8th, 2006, 9:26 pm #17

I was inundated by triggers within my first 72 hours of not smoking. I was brought to the point of tears. Looking back now and knowing I made it through that gives me the strength to take anything on in life. I am so proud!
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Joel
Joel

October 14th, 2006, 9:51 pm #18

I just made an audio version of this story. It is at http://www.whyquit.com/videos/homesmokingoffice.wmv.
As in the case of the audio tape I made yesterday regarding "I can't quit" ... or ... "I won't quit"? being in an audio format allows me to add a little more detail than I use in the written letter. Of course, it also makes them harder to edit.
While recording this sequence, I ended up using the real name of the person three times, when I was making a concerted effort to use the name Mark. I am getting faster at editing out these kind of errors.
John pointed out that there were discrepencies in my last audio tape as compared to the letters. The letters were written to be as concise as possible. I am not particularly skilled at speaking as concise as possible. I am adding in additional details in the audio and video segments that may have been cut from the written version of these stories.
The main discrepency in this story is the distance Mark had to travel. In my letter on the topic here I said 20 miles each way. The suburb involved is pretty wide, and I think that driving distance to downtown Chicago from the East end of that suburb would be around 15 miles and the West end would be 20 miles. Come to think of it, downtown Chicago is pretty big too so there may be even a little more variation in distance. Mark never said how far he was driving, I was just estimating it from the general suburb distance that I knew he lived in.
The audio version here is just a little over 10 minutes. I am hoping that people who have not been viewing the videos because of slow internet connections may find this version of media more usable. I would have been doing audio from the beginning but just couldn't figure out how. I made some technological leaps over the past few days giving me more flexibility in this kind of media production.
I hope all of these new tools become valuable resources in helping people to make and stick to a personal commitment to never take another puff.
Joel
Last edited by Joel on April 10th, 2009, 12:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

November 29th, 2006, 9:18 am #19

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roho diablo
roho diablo

November 30th, 2006, 6:27 am #20

Wouldn't it be safe to say avoiding triggers in the beginning of a quit is wise but to continue to do so is harmful? I am still in the mindset of avoiding situations I know could be hard for me but understand the need to put myself directly in the face of them in the future, in order to move past my fear.
What is a reasonable amount of time before I nned to come out of hiding? I'm sure it varies for each person and situation.
Di
I have been quit for 1 Week, 2 Days, 14 hours, 31 minutes and 9 seconds (9 days). I have saved $34.57 by not smoking 144 cigarettes. I have saved 12 hours of my life. My Quit Date: 11/20/2006 12:00 AM
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Joel
Joel

November 30th, 2006, 9:47 am #21

"Wouldn't it be safe to say avoiding triggers in the beginning of a quit is wise but to continue to do so is harmful?"
I don't think that is a safe assumption. I think the sooner people face their biggest fears the sooner they prove to themselves that the fears are unwarranted. As far as for avoiding triggers, the only way to do this is to get yourself locked up while you are quitting smoking. Here is a string that addresses my thoughts on this topic:
Being locked-up to quit smoking
This one also touches on this issue of avoiding triggers or problems when quitting:
"I will quit when ..."
Last edited by Joel on April 10th, 2009, 12:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

January 5th, 2007, 10:48 pm #22

I saw a post from a new member who got through her first drinking situations smoke free. I just popped up the post Can people quit smoking and still drink alcohol? which discusses how people who are social drinkers are able to carry on that aspect of their lives after they quit smoking. I always try to make it clear though that there needs to be a clear distinction between social drinkers and people who may be alcoholic which is why I kicked up that post.
For the truly social drinker though, the sooner he or she overcomes his or her first drinking situation, the sooner he or she will get over the fear of being able to have a drink without smoking
As it says above:
I think the sooner people face their biggest fears the sooner they prove to themselves that the fears are unwarranted. As far as for avoiding triggers, the only way to do this is to get yourself locked up while you are quitting smoking. Here is a string that addresses my thoughts on this topic:
Being locked-up to quit smoking
This one also touches on this issue of avoiding triggers or problems when quitting:
"I will quit when ..."
Last edited by Joel on April 10th, 2009, 12:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

September 15th, 2008, 10:11 pm #23

Social Drinkers

Truly social drinkers can still drink alcohol without risk of smoking relapse--but being mentally prepared can be crucially important for them. They must go into ALL drinking situations reminding themselves that they are recovering nicotine addicts and that they are going to be recovering nicotine addicts for the rest of their lives.

While that may not sound great in concept--being a recovering nicotine addict--it sure beats being an actively using nicotine addict, hands down. For over time, being a recovering nicotine addict has no real signs or symptoms and no real adverse health or even social effects associated with it. Being an active user would actively be destroying tissue with every puff, depositing cancer-producing chemicals with every puff, assaulting your heart and circulatory system with every puff, costing you money with every puff, and making you reek with every puff.

It is important for these people to know that know that everything that they could do as smokers, they can also do as ex-smokers. They just have to teach themselves how. There are some things that new quitters are forced to learn early on like how to eat, sleep, use the washroom, breathe, etc. These are things that are required from day one for survival. So even though they may resist doing one of them, they can't resist for long and will thereby be forced to start to break the association to smoking early on.

Other things are sometimes put off and seen as unimportant to face early on. Tasks like doing housework, laundry, cleaning, brushing teeth, combing hair, or maybe even going to work and doing their jobs. While it is true that people won't die if they stop doing one or more of these activities for a day or two, putting off doing them too long will create a set of problems that can be quite annoying to those around them.

Besides threatening their livelihood and making them look like slobs in general, if carried on too long, it can really start to make them feel intimidated that they may never again be able to do these activities. Again, it must be repeated, everything a person did as a smoker they can also do as an ex-smoker--but they have to teach themselves how.

Now when it comes to areas of less importance like watching television, sports, playing cards, being a couch potato, and yes, even drinking with friends--things that are not necessary for survival and in fact, things that may not even be good for a person--well, the truth is people can do these things too as ex-smokers.

The same process is necessary though. They have to teach themselves how. Holding off too long can create a sense of intimidation, the feeling that they can never do the specific activity again. This simply is not the case. They will be able to get themselves back to their pre-quitting existence if they choose to.

Drinking is a special case because the association is so strong and by its very nature lowers their inhibitions. It can cause people to do some very irrational behaviors. Smoking can be one of them. Because of the drug's influence, it is best that people take it on gradually, in the beginning in a safe environment.

These people should probably limit themselves to one drink the first time out just to show themselves that they can have a drink without smoking. Also, they should do it with people who are non-smokers and who really are supportive of their quitting. This is a much safer situation in the beginning than going out with drinking buddies who smoke cigarettes and who may be a tad envious of their quitting, and who, while drinking themselves also have their inhibitions lowered. It may manifest in behaviors of encouragement of smoking at a time when the person is more vulnerable.

Soon ex-smokers will be able to face these environments too. Again it is best that they do it gradually, breaking some of the association and intimidation factors in the safer controlled environments. The fact is, though, for the rest of their lives they will need to keep their guard up, in a sense reminding themselves of their reasons for having quit and the importance to stay off smoking, every time before they go drinking. It prepares them to face the situation in a much safer state of readiness.

These people need to use timetables that they are comfortable with, but the sooner they take on activities like drinking the sooner that they will prove to themselves that life goes on without smoking.
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Joel
Joel

October 19th, 2008, 9:48 am #24

Video Title Dial up HS/BB MP3 Audio Length Added
Avoiding situation where you used to smoke 4.67mb 13.94mb 5.75mb 12:39 11/29/06
"I'm not joining this clinic" 4.62mb 13.8mb 5.73mb 12:33 09/27/06
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FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

November 8th, 2009, 11:00 pm #25

From above:

"Wouldn't it be safe to say avoiding triggers in the beginning of a quit is wise but to continue to do so is harmful?"


I don't think that is a safe assumption. I think the sooner people face their biggest fears the sooner they prove to themselves that the fears are unwarranted. As far as for avoiding triggers, the only way to do this is to get yourself locked up while you are quitting smoking. Here is a string that addresses my thoughts on this topic:

Being locked-up to quit smoking


This one also touches on this issue of avoiding triggers or problems when quitting:
"I will quit when ..."

Related videos:
Video Title Dial up HS/BB MP3 Audio Length Added
Avoiding situation where you used to smoke 4.67mb 13.94mb 5.75mb 12:39 11/29/06
"I'm not joining this clinic" 4.62mb 13.8mb 5.73mb 12:33 09/27/06
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

March 1st, 2011, 2:51 pm #26

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