Are aaahhh memories calling your name?

Retraining the conscious mind

Are aaahhh memories calling your name?

FreedomNicotine
Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

30 Jan 2009, 16:06 #1

From: John (Gold) (Original Message) Sent: 7/30/2002 10:54 PM
Just a quick post to you former nicotine junkies out Image there who have invested 10 days to two weeks into your healing yet find yourself toying with new excuses to relapse - FORGET IT ! 

The millions of smoking memories gradually fading away deep into your mind were created by a drug addict while they rode a 20 to 30 minute lifetime cycle of nicotine-dopamine highs and lows. There is nothing left to relieve. Your blood is clean and your body chemically adjusted to physically functioning without the drug nicotine. Those aaahhh memories of feeling your sagging blood serum nicotine level being brought back into the comfort zone - by just one new puff of nicotine - no longer belong to you!  Your cycle of chemical dependency has been broken.
There is nothing in that white wrapper now except the exact same message you received with your first smoke ever - hot nasty tasting gases, dizzy and maybe a cough - but no sense of relief - none - as there is no longer anything missing! You worked hard for your freedom! Don't buy into the memories created by an active addict! They're not yours! Enjoy your healing!  Today is doable if we'll simply never take another puff!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,
John : )
Original A New Excuse to Replase Thread

Last edited by FreedomNicotine on 26 Jul 2011, 18:38, edited 4 times in total.
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FreedomNicotine
Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

30 Jan 2009, 16:08 #2

From: ImageDubiouslyDos Sent: 7/30/2002 11:56 PM
Hang on to your quits kids...(Lilac you too)....junkie thinking is devious and will try to "help" your brain get a nicotine fix - DON'T GO THERE.....most all of us here know it will only mean years of more self abuse....Choice is first and foremost...just being here instead of hiding in the garage or side of the house or your back porch...ya know ya want to "STOP THE INSANITY..." (Who was it who said that anyways...?)
Knowledge is power...stay on top of the junkie in your mind...and NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF....
Dos (Dubious)
9 Weeks and bone tired of typing in stats today...but I really needed to be here..so stay with me...k?

From: ImageTJOHNgold Sent: 7/31/2002 12:17 AM
That title says it all John!!!! It has been today, and well yesterday, can't remember the day before. It doesn't matter though, I'm not giving in, no way! Thanks. This post as well as Martys and Joannes were very helpful for me today.
T John
I have chosen not to smoke for 3 Weeks 1 Day 20 Hours 8 Minutes 59 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 913. Money saved: $159.88.
From: Lilac (Bronze) Sent: 7/31/2002 6:04 AM
Wow! This is very strange.. I had a difficult day yesterday----all day instead of my usual evening. I woke up at midnight tonight and haven't gone back to sleep. It is around five now, my usual getting up time. I have been trying to get my mind on T.V. or reading ----no luck. Daily, I spend a lot of time reading in the forum but I felt in my present mood cheery little messages would only make me feel worse and vilifying smokers and cigarettes would be even worse than that. In desperation I finally tuned into Freedom and ,first off, found this message., factual, tough and clear---exactly what I needed to hear. A cigarette I don't want---the immediate ahhh sensation of smoking , I do.. So, since that is out, on I go , miserable or not. I am totally convinced that I will never smoke again but I am not totally convinced that some day I am going to feel wonderful.. Gratefully, LIlac

From: Hillbilly(Gold) Sent: 7/31/2002 6:18 AM
I hear you, Lilac and I understand. "I am totally convinced that I will never smoke again but I am not totally convinced that someday I am going to feel wonderful."
That's the beauty of this, Lilac you don't have to worry about "someday" because all you have is today. Just today, don't smoke. You can't change 55 years of the past and you have no guarantee of tomorrow ever getting here. All that leaves you with is today. One day. Don't smoke for----One Day. It really is that simple. Before you know it, "someday" gets here.
As far as feeling "wonderful" is nicotine going to make you feel wonderful or is it just going to cause a relapse into active addiction? I understand how confused you are, it's a "damned if I do, damned if I don't" deal. You're feeling miserable still in psychological withdrawal and you're going to feel tremendous guilt and depression if you relapse, so there's no way to win, right? This is not what quitting is all about, it's what the short-term is all about. This really does get better, but not overnight. You must have patience, something most smokers are not long on.
You gotta hang on, this doesn't happen overnight. If it was easy, everyone would do it, but you're so close to comfort now. Remember: Don't put one in your mouth and if you do don't light it!! Translated, well you know.....
Image Dave
I have chosen not to smoke, nor chew nor go with the girls that do for 3 Months 1 Week 6 Days 8 Hours 17 Minutes 49 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 3652. Money saved: $502.16.

From: Lilac (Bronze) Sent: 7/31/2002 6:34 AM
Many blessings on you , dear Hillbilly. How comforting to get that quick and empathetic response. I AM impatient and old enough, God knows, to know better I will SETTLE for this moment , this day and put tomorrow aside until tomorow. Many thanks, Lilac

From: ZAREFAH Sent: 7/31/2002 6:41 AM
1: Take 250,00 cigarettes and place them in a huge heap.
2: Smoke 1 cigarette every 30 minutes for the next 35 years.
3: The only time you can deviate is while asleep...
if you wake up for any reason continue the regimen until you go back to bed.
4: Doing this will make you very sick & kill you.
Sounds pretty nuts, huh? That's what I did. Is there any consolation knowing that I lit the first one when I was 9 years old? Maybe. What could I have known about addiction then? Later on I learned how bad they were & still kept smoking. One right after another. Denial, denial, denial. It took lots of knowledge & support to make me see that it was time for me to make a grown up decision about my addiction. That meant biting the bullet and letting go of nicotine. Just like all of you are doing now. One day at a time. I remember the fear of living my life without a smoke. The early cravings were like a cruel reminder of who I really was. An addict that nicotine had in such a strong grip that I couldn't remember a smokefree day in my whole life. It started to make me mad. I thnk it was at that point that I was able to "welcome the cravings". It was then that I started to fight back for my life. I was angry & I was winning.
I am free now. I haven't had fond memories of old nic for a long time. I don't have to clear my throat constantly. I can breathe clear down to the bottom of my belly. I can dance. I can pull up a big grouper from 110 feet. I can ride my bike for 10 miles real fast. Yes, I can even work at a job I've done for 22 years:) I can do all the things I love to do. I hope to be able to do them for a long time.I always knew God would show me the way. I found my way when I found Freedom. You will too. Just hang in there...no matter what...not one puff!
Big hugs, Joy
Two years, one month, three weeks, six days, 9 hours, 30 minutes and 59 seconds. 15747 cigarettes not smoked, saving $2,519.67. Life saved: 7 weeks, 5 days, 16 hours, 15 minutes.

From: ImageImageDubiouslyDos Sent: 7/31/2002 7:23 AM
Thank you Zarefah..........and guess what....We must remember not to embrace and "emotionalize" our quit. Memories, they will come and go...But please don't let them mess with Joe...
From: ImageImageBillW-Gold Sent: 7/31/2002 8:48 AM
John:
I remember that! I remember that! When I lost a 6 month quit about 13 years ago, I distinctly remember the no Ahhhhhh feeling on the first puff! Not to worry.....I finished the pack, and by that time I was a practicing addict again.......
A little experimental verification, so that someone else won't be so tempted to try the experiment themselves.
BillW Five months, three weeks, one day, 23 hours, 48 minutes and 25 seconds. 5189 cigarettes not smoked, saving $1,024.73. Life saved: 2 weeks, 4 days, 25 minutes.
From: John (Gold) Sent: 7/31/2002 9:40 AM
How each Freedom graduates looks at their journey and their feelings about it, like their Image reasons for quitting, are very personal to each of us. There is only one thing we must each fully appreciate in order to continue our healing and that's the power of a puff to take it all away!
Fantastic post Joy! Good to hear from you. For those who don't know, Joy served as an assistant manager here at Freedom and, like so many others since, went above and beyond in supporting others.
Lilac, as Dave says, 55 years conditioning - like Joy starting at age 9 and having zero memory recall of what it was like to not be hooked - would naturally leave you in a state of disbelief when you read posts from 30 and 40 year nicotine smokers telling you that it's far easier up ahead than it ever was while still being hooked.
I'm with Dave, today's healing is all that matters and today is doable for all of us! You're doing fantastic! This adjustment period can be like setting around watching a broken bone heal or never taking your eyes off of a tomato plant until its fruit is vine ripe. Give yourself a little break! One of the more challenging parts of my adjustment was climbing out of my deep deep smoker's trench so that I could begin exploring and noticing that I'd allowed my dependency to deprive me of things that took more than 30 minutes to accomplish or that required more lung capacity and endurance than I previously had.
Joy shared a little of that in her post. I think the first time I noticed that my lungs were REALLY healing was when I had to run after my dog because of an approaching car. I was amazed that I wasn't totally out of breath and bent over with my hands on my knees panting like the dog I'd chased. Be proud of you Lilac! You've made a major investment in a new beginning and today is doable! John : )
From: MareBear {GOLD} Sent: 11/26/2002 4:09 PM
Image

From: Parker - GOLD! Sent: 2/14/2003 2:58 PM
Image
From: John (Gold) Sent: 4/23/2003 10:40 AM
Riding Robust Dreams to Freedom
Welcome to WhyQuit.com! What is the inner source that will allow you to stop smoking nicotine, skip those once mandatory feedings, and resume full control of your life? Strength, willpower, desire?

It would be natural to think that it's a combination of the three but none of us are stronger than our addiction, as is clearly evidenced by our inability to live the drug addict's first wish of being able to control the uncontrollable. You cannot beat your dependency into submission, stand toe to toe with it, or handle one puff of nicotine and prevail. Nicotine's chemical bond with the brain's reward pathways is beyond the reach of strength.

Willpower? Yes, we can each temporarily muster mountains of willpower but can willpower make any of us of us endure a challenge that we lack the motivation to complete? Can you inhale, chew or **** nicotine into your body and then "will it" to not travel to the brain's addiction circuitry or create the chemical need for more? Have you ever been able to order or command the challenges of chemical withdrawal or psychological recovery to cease? If we are incapable of using strength to control our addiction and we cannot "will" our chemical dependency into hibernation or submission, then what remains?

As simple as it may sound, dreams and desires born of honest recognition of tobacco's impact upon our life have the amazing ability to fuel change, but it takes keeping those original honest motivations in the forefront and driver's seat of our mind so that they can both consciously and subconsciously guide us home.

The successful quitter finds ways to protect and safeguard their primary motivations so that they remain robust, alive and available at a moment's notice to fuel the patience needed to transition this temporary period of adjustment called "quitting." The intelligent quitter's strategy combines an understanding of the law of addiction - one puff of nicotine equals relapse - with well-protected core motivations.

The successful quitter does not try to forget what their health was like while smoking, what it felt like to be controlled, the growing sense of becoming a social outcast, or that feeling as we stood at the tobacco counter and paid our hard earned money to purchase the more than 4,000 chemicals contained in each cigarette that would slowly destroy our body and mind. The successful quitter keeps such memories - and others - in the forefront of their mind as honest reminders and motivations to fuel their dreams and desires.

The intelligent quitter realizes that if they allow their motivations to die that it is very possible their freedom and healing will die along with them. The intelligent quitter finds ways to fuel their motivations, just one day at a time, through study, understanding, education, skills development, critical observation and honesty. They know that they are 100% guaranteed to continue free today if they'll only maintain and protect their original day #1 genuine desires to ... Never Take Another Puff!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long!
John
Need a boost? Reach for your dreams!
From: Joel Sent: 11/23/2003 12:27 PM
From: ImageImageBarbaraT-1113 Sent: 11/23/2003 1:11 PM
It's almost downright scary here sometimes....like Joel is a mind-reading or something bringing this thread to the top!
I've been having a weird feeling the past few hours...not really wanting to smoke yet not knowing what it was I was feeling. I read John's article and these lines just jumped out and smacked me in the face:
Those aaahhh memories of feeling your sagging blood serum nicotine level being brought back into the comfort zone - by just one new puff of nicotine - no longer belong to you!.
Don't buy into the memories created by an active addict!
I feel calmer and more in control having read this... but I still hate the week-ends!Image

I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Week 3 Days 2 Hours 39 Minutes 41 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 151.



From: ImageImageDlunyGOLD Sent: 11/23/2003 3:11 PM
We can hate the weekends but we can also spend more time reading on the weekends!
It is interesting how Joel knows just when to pull a particular topic to the top. Is he a mind-reader?
Keep up the good work Barbara.
David is a grateful recovering exsmoker. He has been off the nicotine for 2 weeks, 2 days, 6 hours 10 minutes and has left 292 cancer sticks on the store shelf. Oh yeah, he has also saved over 1 day of his life (1 day 20 minutes) and $21.95.
From: ImageImageDevla13 Sent: 4/21/2004 3:00 PM
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From: ImageImagekattatonic1_gold4 Sent: 5/29/2004 9:39 PM
Image
From: ImageImagecnambiar9 Sent: 10/22/2004 1:24 AM
Thought this would be a good read
Image
chandan
Free and Healing for One Month, Three Days, 9 Hours and 53 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 17 Hours, by avoiding the use of 501 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $50.19
From: ImageImageGoldWolf_jmv Sent: 1/6/2005 9:32 PM
Getting that "ahhhhhh" memory, take a deep breath
of fresh air ....... no smoke....no stench....just good ole clean crisp air!!!!
Now that's what "ahhhhhhh" is all about!!!
Jason 
Free and Healing for Nine Months, Twenty Two Days, 1 Hour and 47 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 20 Days and 13 Hours, by avoiding the use of 5921 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $1,348.68.
From: ImageImageJoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 1/19/2005 2:46 PM
John,
One particular image I found either here or at WhyQuit provided my 'Light Bulb' Imagemoment that led to my decision to NTAP.
I would like to share it with others exept I can't find it now!. It is an animated gif that shows the Cycle of Addiction.
When I saw that junkie's eyes light up after a puff it all became clear to me why I had never been able to completely break free of nicotine prior to starting my quit Jan 10th.
I realized that I had to break the cycle completely.

Can you point me to where I can find the animation and I will put it in my album. Thanks Joe
Joe - Free and Healing for Nine Days, 4 Hours and 29 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 19 Hours, by avoiding the use of 230 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $34.47.
From: John (Gold) Sent: 1/19/2005 10:24 PM
Joe, it's in the + Drug Addiction photo album, the home of many of my favorites. Feel free to use it or ANY image from any of the albums with a + in front of them. It was my first real attempt at making an animated GIF file and although extremely amateurish I recall with fondness putting it together. As you can tell, I'm no artist but do hope I was able to capture both the aaahhh and urge command. John (Gold x5)
Image
From: ImageImageJoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 1/20/2005 11:42 AM
John - Thanks so much! One benefit of searching for this gif for the last two days is that I have read and re-read many articles. I took the WhyQuit test again and improved to a 93%, it's sinking in! Seeing the animated Cycle of Addiction was not an aaaaaahhhhhh moment for me it was an AHA!Image moment!
I had never broken the cycle on previous quits, never understood about Just One Puff!
I have had shameful relapses (how about bumming a cig from a stranger at Disney World with my wife and kids) but every time was with the aid of NRT or other crutch. Never thought I could go 'Cold Turkey" as anxiety and panic had always thwarted me within the first day or two. NOT THIS TIME AND NEVER AGAIN.
Motivated, Determined and Educated to NTAP / One day at a time .


My name is Joe and I'm a Nicotine Addict who is now Free and Healing for Ten Days, 1 Hour and 26 Minutes,

From: ImageImagekattatonic1_gold4 Sent: 1/31/2005 1:46 AM
Image

From: ImageImagejohnnynonic Sent: 5/4/2005 9:58 PM
Image

From: Image JoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 5/4/2005 11:22 PM
 Image Make sure you hit the 'First' button. Thanks Johnny for the comeback.

From: ImageImageJoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 9/22/2005 7:11 AM
While searching for some articles to print out and send to my Dad I found this one, one of my favorites. Read and believe to achieve.
My name is JoeJFree always a nicotine addict and gratefully now an X-smoker for 8 months, 11 days, 20 hours, 55 minutes and 45 seconds (254 days)
I've now reclaimed 22 Days and 2 Hours to live life as I choose!
NTAP!

From: Image JoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 12/27/2005 10:15 PM
My 'Aha!" moment. Hoping it works for someone else.Image
Image
From: ImageImagejohnnynonic Sent: 2/20/2006 7:03 AM
 Image Make sure you hit the 'First' button.
From: ImageImageSal-GOLD Sent: 2/26/2006 5:21 PM
You worked hard for your freedom! Don't buy into the memories created by an active addict! They're not yours! Enjoy your healing! Today is doable if we'll simply never take another puff!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,
John : )
From: ImageImageanhef Sent: 2/26/2006 5:26 PM
thanks for bringing this one back to the top. I have this posted on my desk, and a copy in my jacket pocket *teehee* where the sickerettes used to be, and an0ther copy at my computer.
every time I want that ahh....i read this, then I go take a deep "puff" of fresh air instead. Ahhhh, now that's living.
thanks again, annie
From: ImageImageSal-GOLD Sent: 3/1/2006 9:35 PM
 ImageFor Kristie, who's now free.
From: Kristie Sent: 3/1/2006 10:03 PM
Dear Sal,
It doesn't get any clearer than that now does it? Image
Thanks!
Kristie - Free and Healing for Thirteen Days and 29 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 21 Hours, by avoiding the use of 260 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $42.21.
From: ImageImageSal-GOLD Sent: 3/7/2006 9:13 AM
Image
There is nothing in that white wrapper now except the exact same message you received with your first smoke ever - hot nasty tasting gases, dizzy and maybe a cough - but no sense of relief - none - as there is no longer anything missing ! You worked hard for your freedom! Don't buy into the memories created by an active addict! They're not yours! Enjoy your healing! Today is doable if we'll simply never take another puff!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,
John : )
From: ImageImagewhosthisitsmesilly Sent: 3/28/2006 6:43 AM
I just think of the ahhh moment as junkie thinking now, it has finaly sank in. Image
I have been quit for 2 Weeks, 6 Days, 12 hours, 44 minutes and 25 seconds (20 days). I have saved £85.20 by not smoking 410 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 10 hours and 10 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 08/03/2006 00:00

From: ImageImageKristen_Goldx3 Sent: 4/22/2006 9:20 AM
Image 

From: Image Sal-GOLD Sent: 5/2/2006 10:25 AM
Image

From: ImageImageJoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 5/24/2006 10:37 PM
ImageMy 'Aha!" Image moment. Hoping it works for someone else.Image

From: John (Gold) Sent: 8/2/2006 6:23 AM
Imagine placing a drug addict's
aaahhh memories above life itself
Image
The Nightmare of Loving a smoker Who Fails to Quit

From: ImageImageSal-GOLD Sent: 8/24/2006 4:01 PM
 ImageRecognizing Needs Image
From: ImageImageJoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 8/30/2006 7:29 AM
Image There is nothing left to relieve. Your blood is clean and your body chemically adjusted to physically functioing without the drug nicotine. Those aaahhh memories of feeling your sagging blood serum nicotine level being brought back into the comfort zone - by just one new puff of nicotine - no longer belong to you!. Your cycle of chemical dependency has been broken.
There is nothing in that white wrapper now except the exact same message you received with your first smoke ever - hot nasty tasting gases, dizzy and maybe a cough - but no sense of relief - none - as there is no longer anything missing ! You worked hard for your freedom! Don't buy into the memories created by an active addict! They're not yours! Enjoy your healing! Today is doable if we'll simply never take another puff!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,
John : )

From: ImageImageJoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 9/15/2006 12:09 PM
While listening to John ( http://www.worldtalkradio.com/archive.asp?aid=7891) the importance of this concept surely comes thru loud and clear!
Why we believe we need to smoke/chew tobacco?
You Smoke Because You're A Smoke-a-holic!
Some new findings on Nicotine Addiction
Nicotine - a neuromodulator
Are you a nicotine junkie?
Getting vigilant and staying vigilant with the concept of addiction
From: ImageImageJoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 9/17/2006 10:10 AM
There is nothing in that white wrapper now except the exact same message you received with your first smoke ever - hot nasty tasting gases, dizzy and maybe a cough - but no sense of relief - none - as there is no longer anything missing ! You worked hard for your freedom! Don't buy into the memories created by an active addict! They're not yours! Enjoy your healing! Today is doable if we'll simply never take another puff!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,
John : )

From: ImageImageJoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 1/26/2007 7:36 AM
ImageThere is nothing left to relieve.Image
From: ImageImageSal-GOLD Sent: 2/4/2007 6:20 PM
The Law of Addiction
The administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of dependence upon the addictive substance at the old level of use or greater.
Image
From: ImageImageJoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 4/2/2007 11:51 PM
Know that the Ahhhh you remember so fondly came from actually relieving the onset of early withdrawal anxiety signals at 30 to 60 minute intervals. The ahhh is gone, matter of fact it was really never there. Image If you try to go back and find it it will not be there. Don't think that a paper tube of manufactured and engineered tobacco or flavored piece of pharmaceutical grade nicotine gum holds any value beyond maintaining your nicotine concentration in your blood serum. It will not make you feel better. You will feel much worse when you need another one and then another and another and another and another......etc. ad nauseum!

NTAP.....and be free - naturally.

From: ImageImageCrystal_View1 Sent: 8/4/2007 1:34 PM
Image 
From: Dionne (gold) Sent: 8/5/2007 7:53 PM
I love reading this message today as much as a few years ago John. In fact it makes me grin when I read "that my blood is clean and my body has chemically adjusted to functioning without the drug nicotine." After an adult lifetime of smoking I am still an eager beaver about my quit. It's coming up to 7 years in a few months and I remain humbled with gratitude.
It's just the coolest thing ever.
Take care you all, your quit sis, Dionne.
From: ImageImageJoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 9/12/2007 11:35 AM
Image There is nothing left to relieve. Your blood is clean and your body chemically adjusted to physically functioing without the drug nicotine. Those aaahhh memories of feeling your sagging blood serum nicotine level being brought back into the comfort zone - by just one new puff of nicotine - no longer belong to you!. Your cycle of chemical dependency has been broken.
There is nothing in that white wrapper now except the exact same message you received with your first smoke ever - hot nasty tasting gases, dizzy and maybe a cough - but no sense of relief - none - as there is no longer anything missing ! You worked hard for your freedom! Don't buy into the memories created by an active addict! They're not yours! Enjoy your healing! Today is doable if we'll simply never take another puff!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,
John : )

From: ImageImageSal-GOLD Sent: 10/12/2007 9:25 AM
From above:
You worked hard for your freedom! Don't buy into the memories created by an active addict! They're not yours! Enjoy your healing! Today is doable if we'll simply never take another puff!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,
John : )
From: ImageImageSal-GOLD Sent: 10/28/2007 6:03 PM
 ImageRecognizing Needs
Image I Want "Something"
Image Why am I still having "urges?"
Image Craves and thoughts that occur over time

From: ImageImageSal-GOLD Sent: 2/20/2008 5:37 PM
The Law of Addiction
The administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of dependence upon the addictive substance at the old level of use or greater.
Image

From: ImageImageJoeJFree-Gold- Sent: 6/18/2008 2:25 PM
Image There is nothing left to relieve. Your blood is clean and your body chemically adjusted to physically functioing without the drug nicotine. Those aaahhh memories of feeling your sagging blood serum nicotine level being brought back into the comfort zone - by just one new puff of nicotine - no longer belong to you!. Your cycle of chemical dependency has been broken.
There is nothing in that white wrapper now except the exact same message you received with your first smoke ever - hot nasty tasting gases, dizzy and maybe a cough - but no sense of relief - none - as there is no longer anything missing ! You worked hard for your freedom! Don't buy into the memories created by an active addict! They're not yours! Enjoy your healing! Today is doable if we'll simply never take another puff!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,
John : )


From: ImageImageSal-GOLD Sent: 9/20/2008 11:07 AM
From Being tempted watching others smoke by Joel Spitzer
Ex-smokers are often tempted when watching others smoke. Spending time with a specific friend and watching them smoke may be a trigger especially if it was the most time you had spend with the friend since you quit smoking. The first time you have any new experiences, even if smoking is not part of the ritual, the thought for a cigarette will seem like a natural part of the ritual.

Another factor is when watching a person smoke, the natural tendency is for the ex-smoker to start to fantasize about how good a cigarette will be at that given moment. A more productive way to handle the situation though is to really watch the person smoke one, and then wait a few minutes as they light another and then another. Soon you will see that they are smoking in a way that you don't want to and probably in a way that they don't want to either. But they have no choice. You do. Also, I am attaching a letter here that addresses this issue. It is a little harder to describe because it is based on a demonstration I do at live seminars that you have never seen.

One demonstration I do at all my live seminars is a little smoking contraption made out of a plastic Palmolive bottle with a mouth piece inserted to hold a cigarette. The simulation shows how much smoke comes in when a person inhales, and how much comes out when they exhale. Smokers often feel they take in smoke and then blow most of it out, when in actuality, a very small percent actually comes out (about 10%.) I always use cigarettes given to me by people in the audience, if I used one I brought people would think I was using a loaded cigarette. Anyway, below is a letter I wrote for clinic graduates who have seen this demonstration. The concepts here though apply to those who haven't also. Take my word for it, or better yet, Joanne, Linda or Joyce could explain their memories of the demonstration. Viewing smoking as it really looks will minimize the temptation even of a puff.

Anyway, here is the letter.

Whenever you watch a person smoking, think of the Palmolive bottle demonstration you saw the first day of the Stop Smoking Clinic. Visualize all of the smoke that goes into the bottle that doesn't come out. Also, remember that the smoker is not only going to smoke that one cigarette. He will probably smoke another within a half-hour. Then another after that. In fact, he will probably smoke 20, 40, 60 or even more cigarettes by the end of the day. And tomorrow will be the same. After looking at cigarettes like this, you don't want to smoke a cigarette, do you?

I always suggest that clinic participants follow this simple visualization exercise to help them overcome the urge for a cigarette. When I suggested it to one participant who was off for three days she replied, "I see, you want me to brainwash myself so that I don't want a cigarette."

Somehow I don't consider this technique of visualizing smoking brainwashing. It is not like the ex-smoker is being asked to view smoking in an artificially horrible, nightmarish manner. To the contrary, I am only asking the ex-smoker to view cigarette smoking in its true light.

The Palmolive bottle demonstration accurately portrays the actual amount of smoke that goes in as compared to the small amount that you see the smoker blow out. Most smokers believe they exhale the majority of smoke they inhale into their lungs. But, as you saw by the demonstrations, most of the smoke remains in the lungs. When you visualize all the smoke that remains, it does not paint a pretty picture of what is happening in the smoker. Maybe not a pretty picture, but an accurate one.

When an ex-smoker watches a person smoke a cigarette, he often fantasizes about how much the smoker is enjoying it--how good it must taste and make him feel. It is true he may be enjoying that particular cigarette, but the odds are he is not.

Most smokers enjoy a very small percentage of the cigarettes they smoke. In fact, they are really unaware of most of the cigarettes they smoke. Some are smoked out of simple habit, but most are smoked in order to alleviate withdrawal symptoms experienced by all smokers whose nicotine levels have fallen below minimal requirements. The cigarette may taste horrible, but the smoker has to smoke it. And because the majority of smokers are such addicts, they must smoke many such cigarettes every single day in order to maintain a constant blood nicotine level.

Don't fantasize about cigarettes. Always keep a clear, objective perspective of what it would once again be like to be an addicted smoker. There is no doubt at all that if you relapse to smoking you will be under the control of a very powerful addiction. You will be spending hundreds of dollars a year for thousands of cigarettes. You will smell like cigarettes and be viewed as socially unacceptable in many circles. You will be inhaling thousands of poisons with every puff. These poisons will rob you of your endurance and your health. One day they may eventually rob you of your life.

Consider all these consequences of smoking. Then, when you watch a smoker you will feel pity for them, not envy. Consider the life he or she is living compared to the simpler, happier, and healthier life you have had since you broke free from your addiction. Consider all this and you will NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
Last edited by FreedomNicotine on 26 Jul 2011, 18:56, edited 2 times in total.
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FreedomStaff
Joined: 30 Aug 2011, 12:44

15 Aug 2012, 10:58 #3

Extra credit reading.
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