Actions speak louder than words—or thought.

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Sep 2002, 06:33 #11

Image For Naymor:

Your post may have said that you didn't care, but the fact that you posted instead of smoking says something to the contrary. Again, as in the title here, your actions spoke louder than words--or thoughts. The action was you stayed on course and continued to stick to your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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misledfairy
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

13 Sep 2002, 21:13 #12

True, true, thanks Joel I have to (albeit grugingley) admit you just may have a point.Image
Love Naymor xxxx
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Nov 2002, 10:04 #13

Image For Dii:

I think she will appreciate this one today.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Nov 2002, 20:55 #14

Image For Melissa:

Today still your actions are speaking louder than your words or your thoughts. The action is you didn't take a puff yesterday and I strongly suspect if you are here reading now you are not planning on taking one puff today either. As long as you continue this practice, it does not matter if you never think of a puff again or if you think of it daily. You will never relapse as long as you never take another puff!
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Joanne Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

15 Dec 2002, 16:14 #15

"......it does not matter if you never think of a puff again or if you think of it daily. You will never relapse as long as you never take another puff!" Image
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Jul 2003, 21:29 #16

If you averaged 8 puffs per cigarette, 15 cigarettes per day, and 20 years of smoking nicotine, you created 876,000 tiny memories of having handled a cigarette, 876,000 memories of having put it to your lips, 876,000 tiny memories of sucking 4,000+ chemicals into your mouth, 876,000 memories of having smelled and tasted their arrival, 876,000 memories of the smoke's destructive cargo filling your lungs, 876,000 small memories of sensing nicotine arrive in your brain (the aaahhhh memories).
Don't you find it utterly amazing that many here report experiencing that very first day where they never once "think" about "wanting" to smoke nicotine within just 90 days of quitting? After the first such day they become more and more common until your expectations evolve to the point where upon waking each day you expect not to "want."
Although difficult to appreciate while in the middle of a mind filled with thoughts of smoking, the pace of psychological recovery is ongoing and tremendous. One of the most intensely dependent relationships you've ever known has ended.
Your mind is now sorting through old memories while viewing each group in honest light. They can't hurt you and are a normal part of the recovery process! Baby steps, patience, just one day at a time. The next few minutes are entirely doable and there's only one rule - no nicotine today, NTAP! John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 22 Mar 2009, 22:31, edited 1 time in total.
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Hillbilly(Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

23 Aug 2003, 04:41 #17

The really difficult part of quitting is figuring out how simple it really is. Just don't put one in your mouth. The rest of it is just hunkering down and getting thru it.

Dave

PS--Yeah, I'm cruising at 16 months, but it's still the truth.

PSS--I didn't say easy, I said simple.
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DlunyGOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

03 Jan 2004, 01:55 #18

Thanks Joel for bringing this thread up to the top. I really needed to hear this! I have had some "smoking thoughts" for the last 24 -36 hours myself. I have no intention of going back to the nasty things but at the same time I have had some very strong thoughts and triggers. I am recognizing them as what they are (nostalgia for a different time in my life when I had fewer responsibilities and was much younger) and not so much a desire to actually smoke.

Thanks for reminding us of why we are here and why it is best to never take another puff one day at a time!

yqb, David One month, three weeks, five days, 3 hours, 57 minutes and 18 seconds. 1010 cigarettes not smoked, saving $75.82. Life saved: 3 days, 12 hours, 10 minutes.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Jan 2004, 21:53 #19


It is a normal part of recovery to eventually find yourself sorting through and reflecting upon years of smoking related thoughts and to notice lit cigarettes and smokers around you. We all went through it. With each passing day you move closer to new expectations. There's only one rule to keeping your freedom and healing alive - no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff! John
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Ann
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

11 Oct 2004, 22:16 #20

I really liked reading this; thanks for bringing it up. A few days ago I was having a really rough time but kept reading and reminding myself there is no reason/excuse for relapse. The rough stage passed--despite some remaining triggers I am glad to be free and on the path of healing. I'm very grateful for the simplicity of the NTAP message. Clear, concise, and to the point--and very, very true. On to green tomorrow.

Ann
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