A helping hand and some advice please

annies1
annies1

January 12th, 2007, 5:34 pm #1

I rarely suffer from PMT/PMS but yesterday and again today it is so bad I am really struggling with not smoking!! Is it like this because of the no smoking? has anyone else experienced thi?

I am on my thirteenth day and feel that after the initial 72hours these are the worst days I have experienced - in fact because I have PMT, at the moment they feel like the worst days!!

It may have something to do with its nearly the 1st anniversary of my mums death and it was her birthday on Wednesday. I just feel so vunerable and down.

Thank you
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sue468
sue468

January 12th, 2007, 6:44 pm #2

Hi Annie,

I'm so sorry about the loss of your mother...this has to be a really difficult time for you at the one year anniversary.

I'm new at this too, going into my third week and I have been struggling a little more lately, too. But I don't think it's your PMT/S or your mother's anniversary necessarily causing the cravings but the fact that you (and I and everyone else who recently quit) are newly going through these experiences without using our addiction as a crutch. So it's an adjustment period. We aren't used to dealing with stress and life's difficulties without smoking...

I know there are a lot of helpful articles on here, but I read this one the other night and it made a ton of sense...

Recognizing needs

Maybe reading some of the threads in the CRAVE section of the message boards would help, too.

But just remember, taking a puff now means taking them ALL and will it help you with PMT/S or with the loss of your mother?

Sue

I have been quit for 2 Weeks, 2 Days, 5 hours, 42 minutes and 40 seconds (16 days). I have saved $81.18 by not smoking 324 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day and 3 hours of my life. My Quit Date: 12/27/2006 12:00 AM
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sue468
sue468

January 12th, 2007, 6:52 pm #3

Hi Annie,

I'm sorry but I can't seem to get the link thing working. I'm sure someone more seasoned will come along and help!

Sue
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Joel
Joel

January 12th, 2007, 7:23 pm #4

I periodically see the subject of PMS and quitting raised at the board. I wrote a response in a post about this last year, but realize it would be good to have a string to bring up whenever the issue is brought up again. Women should not feel handicapped in their ability to quit because they may experience symptoms of PMS or for any other reason. Both women and men have the ability to succeed under all potentially adverse situations as long as they work at maintaining their motivation and keeping their resolve reinforced to never take another puff!

Joel
The post from last year written to a specific member who inquired as to how other women dealt with PMS as ex-smokers:

You are very likely experiencing more smoking thoughts at the moment because of your PMS symptoms. This is not saying that sustaining your quit will be difficult every time you experience a menstrual cycle, or that your symptoms are going to be better or worse than they were when you were smoking. It is just likely that the first time you experience your normal monthly cycle smoking thoughts are going to be triggered.

The same thing happens to men and women when there is any change in a physical situation, especially one that they have encountered numerous times in the past. It is like when people catch colds or a flues for the first time after quitting. Every other time they had colds or a flu during their adult years they were smokers. Their rate of smoking was likely affected by these infections. When symptoms were peaking, meaning when their throats were real raw and breathing difficult they likely cut back to a bare minimum amount of smoking. They were likely experiencing increases in withdrawal symptoms whenever they had such infections. When the cold or fly symptoms finally started to dissipate, they likely increased their consumption quickly in an effort to get their nicotine levels where they need to be to stave off withdrawal.

This phenomena could easily result in a person getting increased thoughts for cigarettes the first time they get an infection after quitting. It may not be so much so when they first get sick, but more likely when they first start to get well after being sick. The change in status from feeling ill to feeling normal is a new trigger circumstance for the person.

Keep in mind, it is only new the first time a person goes though this kind of change of physical status. The next time they get a similar infection the thoughts are likely to be less pronounced and after numerous repeats the thoughts toward smoking will likely become non-existent. Not smoking will become a habit for a sick or recovering person. The same principle applies to the normal changes in your body that you are experiencing during your monthly cycles. The first time is quite awkward with smoking thoughts being triggered more than normal. Over time though these thoughts will not likely occur for you will have broken the associations from surviving through the first encounters with your quit intact.

You can go through our board's go back one month option and see how many of the woman at our site seem to have panicking posts complaining of intense smoking thoughts month after month after month on any kind of regular pattern. The fact is there are no such posts on the board because after the first few months not smoking becomes a habit even during times of menstruation.

To keep this quit on the course of getting easier and easier over time is still just as simple as staying totally committed even during tough times to the commitment you made when you first joined up to never take another puff!

Joel
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annies1
annies1

January 12th, 2007, 7:58 pm #5

Thanks all,

I think just getting it out on her made me feel a little better. I have been reading and reading on here since early this morning and am know feeling back on track
and know I will NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF.

I have now quit for 1 Week, 6 Days, 6 hours, 59 minutes and 44 seconds (13 days). I have saved £128.91 by not smoking 531 cigarettes. I have taken back 1 Day, 20 hours and 15 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 30/12/2006 05:00
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whitey
whitey

January 13th, 2007, 2:06 am #6

Hi Annie.
I haven't been on the site for a day or so and just read your post. I'm very sorry about the loss of your mother. You and I have a number of things in common and I just wanted to share what's working for me right now. I'm on day 14 of my quit, it was the first anniversary of my father's death a week before I quit. I'm experiencing some crazy peri-menopausal symptoms (not PMS but similiar to what I used to experience as PMS). It gets confusing sometimes figuring out what is the cause of everything we're going through, doesn't it? Is it the anniversary stuff, is it hormonal, is it the fact that we're at times choosing to 'grieve' the loss of nicotine in our lives? I suggest it's a little of all of the above. When I get my craves I close my eyes and envision my dad holding me and soothing me, knowing that he would want me to be my real, genuine self...free from this horrible addiction. I look at old family pictures when I was young and before I chose to let nicotine to take me over. I look at the freedom from the blackness of nicotine in those innocent days and it helps to solidify my committment to get it back.
You're not alone, Annie. Hang in, okay? Like I've read over and over on this life-saving site, "THERE IS A 100% GUARANTEE THAT THIS WILL GET EASIER".
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