3 years vs. 3 days

Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:56

04 May 2008, 10:41 #101

Who are you John Gold:

You are an idol, an inspiration -- hope you are still not smoking -- loved the cartoon -- i am a non smoker since february of this year - today is 5/3/08- cant believe i am not smoking - thrilled i am not smoking - just made it through some relatively important life events as a non smoker---my co workers ask me every day: how many days??? its kind of surreal -- i did have one weak moment on a vacation evening which i made it through -- but have to say was difficult - i hope that it gets easier over time when the tempting urges hit .... on a daily basis i tell myself NTAP......
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Dec 2008, 14:58 #102

I think the hardest thing to communicate is that quitting is a dynamic process. That you just have to jump in and start swimming. And that, no, those scary feelings that rock you like big waves in the first few days are not the way you will always feel. If they were, probably few would successfully stop smoking, and certainly not the 46 million of us who have done so.
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AJM
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:56

06 Jan 2009, 08:07 #103

Thank you so very much for bringing this topic back to the top of the lists.

I've been a former smoker now for 1 year, 3 months and 30 days. I have been enjoying the relieft that time brings my addiction. It has been comfortable for some time now, and while smoking crosses my mind, it hasn't with any intention for quite a few months.

For some reason (I haven't been able to identify my trigger yet) I've been having thoughts tonight along the lines "one or two wouldn't hurt". My husband is out of town (as he often is) and there's been a little devil telling me that "nobody has to know". Honestly, I was considering a trip to the gas station, since it couldn't possibly hurt to just have one or two. But I decided to come here and visit before I committed to that 2 minute car ride.

Reading this string has helped me remember how easy it is to forget. How easy it could be for a simple craving to slip past my defenses, they're so out of practice. I haven't had to say "no" in months. I haven't had to even think about wanting to smoke in so long. I'd almost forgotten. It scares me how easy it could have been to make such a stupid choice that would have echoed off every future action in my life. And a probable shortened life at that.

Yes, I thought about it. For a few minutes, it sounded pretty good. But then I read this post and I remembered. I remembered the fear of being an active smoker, afraid that each and every puff could be the one that causes cancer. I remembered the shame of being unable to control my addiction and having to hide from my friends and family. I remembered the frustration experienced during daily and hourly withdrawal, anger and irrational behavior displayed in an attempt to satisfy my cravings. I remembered the burning desire to join those ex-smokers lounging on deck.

I'm still addicted to nicotine. I'm going to have to say to "no" to that drug for the rest of my life. But it's OK, I can do that. I'm just incredibly grateful for such a supportive community that can help me to supplement my defenses in a week moment, but always remind me that it is my own choice to NTAP.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

06 Jan 2009, 11:11 #104

To think it's been 4 years since I posted this. Wow. Yay ME!
-------
AJM,
Here's a thread that may worth reading:
Turning the Corner... Acceptance. I'm going to bump it in case you don't click back in here.


Comfortable after 7 years,
Bob
Last edited by OBob Gold on 01 Nov 2009, 14:39, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 20 Feb 2009, 03:04

07 Mar 2009, 16:18 #105

7 years!!!!!!!! wow, wow, wow and thankyou thankyou thankyou, awesome read!!!
Doris
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Joined: 15 Apr 2009, 23:27

16 Apr 2009, 13:22 #106

hang up there at top,i'm coming...climbing the rope.

3d 15:21 smoke-free, 89 cigs not smoked, Ì.ã.þ 27.250 saved, 06:45 life saved
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Joined: 18 Jan 2009, 18:47

05 Jan 2010, 05:31 #107

TO THE NEWBIES OF 2010

EXCERPT FROM THE FIRST POST IN THIS STRING:

"Three years ago, I was where you are. Everyone here has been there at one time. We understand what you're going through. Nobody here is a superhero. We're just addicts like you who found the rope earlier. And, we can each promise you… the rope is climbable, it does get easier, and there IS a place for you up here.".....O'Bob

THIS CLASSIC MESSAGE IN THE FIRST POST IN THIS STRING GAVE ME AND MANY OTHERS, HOPE AND ENCOURAGEMENT WHEN FIRST QUITTING.
READ IT!!!
CLIMB THAT ROPE ONE DAY AT A TIME. HANG ON TIGHT
NO MATTER WHAT! EVEN IF YOU CAN'T CLIMB FOR THE MOMENT, IT IS YOUR LIFELINE. AND IT WILL DETERMINE THE PATH YOUR LIFE LEADS. FREEDOM IS WORTH EVERY (possible) BLISTER, HIGH FIVE SLAPS AND PATS ON THE BACK ON THE WAY UP. LEARN WHAT YOU CAN! READ, WATCH JOEL'S VIDEOS, ASK QUESTIONS, AND CELEBRATE THE BIG AND SMALL VICTORIES EACH DAY!
YOUR LIFE IS DEPENDING ON YOU!

AND YES, YOU CAN DO THIS!


WENDY-climbed that ol' rope over 3 years ago, after 39 years of nicotine addiction. Will always remember that one puff equals ALL the addiction. No craves here, just raves for freedom.
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Joined: 21 Dec 2009, 18:03

01 Feb 2010, 16:30 #108

The OP was a great read.

I found it 9 days shy of my 2nd month (Feb 10th)

And it helps me keep my smoking days in the obiturary where they belong. My Smoking Days R.I.P. 1993-2009
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Joined: 16 Feb 2010, 16:50

05 Mar 2010, 03:43 #109

This post also help me greatly, especially after the first week. The image of climbing that rope from the rough and harsh climate near the bottom to the idea of lounging on the deck of a luxury yacht of non-smoking.

For me, the strongest image was that the OP, once on board and cruising, said he saw once free and strong co-travellers just stand-up all of a sudden and walk right off the boat into the sea below, to the bottom of the rope.


That is really strong imagery for me.


thanks
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Joined: 20 Jan 2009, 02:28

27 Mar 2010, 15:41 #110

From above.......

So, while it may be tempting to look at some of the longer term quitters with awe, consider that we are, and always will be subject to the same rules you are. One puff = all puffs. If I were to slip down to the pub right now, walk up to a friend, and take a drag off of his cigarette, I know full well that I would be out on my deck tomorrow night with a pack and an ash tray putting memories of Freedom and this post and everything I've given myself over the past 3 years in a deep hidden locker that my junky side would work overtime to prevent me from opening.


Why is it important to point out that, with respect to nicotine addiction, you and I are the same, just separated by a bit of time? I guess because it's tempting for a new quitter to allow himself or herself to believe that all of these people dispensing education and encouragement here, couldn't possibly understand what they're going through. It may be tempting to listen to your own junky mind telling you, "You're different. These people aren't like you. They don't understand what you're experiencing. You know that you'll never be able to be like them. It's impossible for you."

My long-winded, metaphorically-extreme point is to tell you that that's bunk. While you are different from me in many ways, our addiction to nicotine is the same. You will find comfort (emphasis on WILL) just as I and every other long-term member of Freedom did (by never taking another puff), and you WILL maintain that comfort the same way we all must (by never taking another puff).

YQB,
Bob (3 years free)

JohnnyNoNic GOLD
Celebrating 5 years Free
There's plenty of room on the deck and the weather's fine up here, c'mon up and join us...
...all you have to do is just keep remembering to...
Never Take Another Puff
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Joined: 17 Aug 2010, 16:35

31 Aug 2010, 16:43 #111

This post was a wonderful gift to receive today. Thanks so much.
Gratefully Gold

I escaped from the prison of smoking on August 14, 2010.  
[font]The best revenge is quitting well![/font] 
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Joined: 27 Oct 2010, 18:24

28 Oct 2010, 14:51 #112

What a great post.  I am on day 5, and have had the exact feeling you refer to about looking up at the long time quitters.  Wow how did these people last that long.  But you truly do put a great spin on it and I am looking forward to lounging on the deck in the future.

Thanks for the inspiring post
Lisa

Four days, 12 hours, 51 minutes and 14 seconds. 90 cigarettes not smoked, saving $29.48. Life saved: 7 hours, 30 minutes.
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Joined: 18 Jan 2009, 06:57

28 Oct 2010, 16:25 #113

Hi Lisa,

Thought I'd try to answer your question - 'Wow how did these people last that long.' 

For me, it's never been a question about lasting long but living free, finally.  The decision to quit becomes lasting when we decide it is the last one we ever need to do as long as we keep our personal promise to not take another puff - no matter what - for the rest of today.  It's worked every singe day I've been clean of nicotine and I seriously suspect it will work tomorrow too.  As my old buddy ZZRSteve likes to say - 100% of the folks that NTAP are successful ex-smokers.
Really, I cannot imagine living any other way.  Considering that I inhaled the choking smoke containing that addictive poison for over 40 years, since I was a kid, it is still a bit amazing to me too.  But it is true cause what has been recovered is truly me, the way I was always supposed to be.  Deciding to live free is the best thing that I've ever done for me.  Will be for you too. 



Quitting or Recovering? 
Living Without........OR

Take a few minutes and read through all of the responses to Bob's 3 years gold post.  I think you'll see what I mean.

Joe J free 2117 days
Last edited by Joe J free on 06 Jan 2011, 00:31, edited 5 times in total.
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Joined: 02 Dec 2009, 01:52

28 Oct 2010, 16:40 #114

Great post Joe.

Even as a much newer member of Freedom, I couldn't agree with you more! Newbies; take note; it's so true!

We've lost nothing; we've gained LIFE!!

Soon to be GOLD x1!! Sarah 52
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Joined: 05 Jan 2011, 00:09

06 Jan 2011, 00:02 #115

I loved this post.  I am 5 days quit and still learning - trying so, so hard to understand what I am feeling & how to manage it - and probably over-analyzing it each moment of the day.  The hope I see on this site brings tears to my eyes.  I think the tears are a sigh of relief because you all understand what I am going through.  Lisa
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Joined: 04 Jan 2011, 09:51

06 Jan 2011, 07:15 #116

I look forward to complete one month and one year one day. Believe me, I wanna time to run fast and I wanna touch that milestones.......Alas...just 6 days old
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Joined: 30 Dec 2010, 21:50

06 Jan 2011, 18:17 #117

Thanks Wendy,

I smoked far more decades than I want to admit. It is good to read your post that with nearly 40 years of smoking, you found the strength to "climb the rope" and effectually  successfully remain off cigarettes, and begin a new life without them. My quit is still tenuous (yes it is, to anyone wanting to tell me it is not, as we all do this one day at a time), as I have gone this far before and have gone back to smoking!

So, I wonder what is like to go lengthy periods without craving/urges even thoughts of smoking. It has been so long since I was a non-smoker, I don't really remember much what that was like, even if it is ever like that again in quitting, once one has smoked anyway.

Still not smoking is my positive. I guess someday, I will see the other benefits clearly.

Thanks again.

David
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Joined: 23 May 2011, 03:14

25 May 2011, 04:09 #118

This is a great post and very motivational.  I am barely free and clear for a week and am feeling good, but doubting if my resolve can truly last a lifetime.  It can only if I never take another puff and take it one day at a time!  I can't wait to be goldx3.
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Joined: 30 Mar 2011, 13:45

01 Jun 2011, 20:01 #119

I've read this post a few times over the two-and-a-bit months of my quit. I love it every time. The rope burns, the seagull poo, all of it is so vivid and so true.

Thanks Bob. :-)

RS
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Joined: 05 Jan 2011, 00:09

31 Jan 2012, 23:46 #120

I LOVE this post!  this has meant the WORLD to me!!!

I made it to the Lido deck!  I never, ever thought I would.

Thank you OBob - thank you.

Lisa
Gold
quit 1-1-11
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Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

22 Mar 2013, 00:17 #121



Sincere thanks Sal for reminding me today of OBob's Lido Deck post.
What a wonderful message. It's  as true today as it was then.

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John - Gold x13


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Joined: 03 Jul 2013, 14:10

30 Aug 2013, 00:40 #122

Thank you, what a find for me.  Helping me on my path to COMPLETE Freedom.  I am a nicotine addict and will never forget it. I will NTAP.

Judy,
Quit June 23, 2013
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Joined: 21 Apr 2009, 02:43

08 Dec 2016, 23:54 #123

To me this was a classic post and motivated me so much. When I finally reached the Lido deck, I changed my avatar to a golden skiff!!
Life has thrown me a difficult curve and I return to this post to help "pull me up".
Maybe it is because of my east coast maritime roots and "the rope"?

Thank you Joel, for finding the link for me.
The intelligent quitter's strategy combines an understanding of the Law of Addiction
with well-protected core motivations.

Nobody ever graduates from Addiction

Cathy, Gold

[Quit April 10, 2009]
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