1% OTC nicotine inhaler quitting rate?

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

July 2nd, 2004, 8:52 pm #1

Effectiveness of the Nicotine Inhaler for
Smoking Cessation in an OTC Setting
American Journal of Health Behavior 2004 July-August;28(4):291-301.

Leischow SJ, Ranger-Moore J, Muramoto ML, Matthews E.

Acting Associate Director, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD.

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Nicotrol (R) nicotine inhaler as an aid to smoking cessation in over-the-counter (OTC) versus health-care-provider (HCP) conditions.

Methods: Five hundred twenty healthy smokers were randomized to the treatment conditions and followed for a year. Results: At most follow-up visits, abstinence rates for the HCP group were 2 to 3 times those observed in the OTC group. Abstinence at 1 year was.77% in the OTC condition versus 3.08% in the HCP condition [P<.01]. Inhaler use was low.

Conclusions: OTC nicotine inhaler appears to be ineffective, though quit rates are improved with HCP assistance.
PMID: 15228966 [PubMed - in process]

The above study indicates that less than 1% (.77%) of over-the-counter (OTC) nicotine inhaler quitters were still not smoking at one year and that only 3% of those using it with the assistance of their physician were not smoking at one year.

In that unassisted, unsupported, uncounseled and uneducated on-their-own quitters continue to achieve up to 5% one year nicotine cessation rates, it makes you wonder how the FDA approved the nicotine inhaler as an "effective" smoking aid in the first place.

The answer is really rather simple. It didn't have to compete against those wanting to abruptly end all nicotine use and quit cold turkey but against quitters wanting to attempt to engage in weeks or months of nicotine weaning and joining inhaler studies in hopes of getting free inhalers. As shared in the fist link below, a substantial percentage of those assigned to receive inert placebo inhalers could tell that they were not getting the real thing.

Did their frustrated expectations result in higher than normal placebo group drop-out rates that allowed the inhaler to recieve an unearned odds ratio victory when the active group's performance was compared to placebo group performance? I'm convinced that the entire $1.4 billion annual NRT industry was built upon similar unearned odds ratio victories. John (Gold x5)

Other recent NRT findings and disclosures:
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Joel
Joel

July 7th, 2004, 6:24 pm #2

I saw a member asking about issues about her husband's chances using the inhaler.
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Lyverbyrd
Lyverbyrd

July 8th, 2004, 1:44 am #3

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