Information: This forum has been set to read only for archive purposes. The link to active FE forum is https://www.fordfe.com/index.php

Italian design in the 1960's

Italian design in the 1960's

Joined: January 9th, 2001, 10:20 pm

June 4th, 2004, 11:17 pm #1



Theo, I totally agree with your comments on Italian design. Here is an example of the high art back in the "early" 1960s. Notice the almost pefect lines at virtually all areas of the body, including perfect proportiions.

Pretty awesome. Too bad they didn't build one with a 352/360, a 390/401, a 406/405 or of course any number of 428 or 427 variants. In that car, the 353/360 would have been awesome, and anything more would have been outa-this-world !

regards, P
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 7th, 2000, 3:26 am

June 5th, 2004, 8:27 am #2

...I've never gone too deep into this period of history. When I grew up you could sometimes see one of this breed decorating the whole street. They were allways an exotic attraction even in those days. Guess that's an attractive field for a new old addiction. We'd probably have to create a new forum for that . Very nice photo BTW. PERFECT.
I think today's auto makers miss to go with the retro concept business. On the other hand it's understandable because they're extremely dictated by emission and safety laws.
For instance, you wouldn't be allowed to design a car with a split bumper like the one on your pic. Beltlines and height of bumpers are standardized and defined by the law, no escape here.
I wonder if you could get away w. a totally stock (identically built) car that you don't declare "reissue", but "continue production". Off course it would have to be distributed by the original manufacturer.
Comparing the Italos w. the modern so called sports cars, vehicles like the Bentley look like military vehicles. We probably had too much JB 007 or star wars influence over the last decades. It seems to me as if each new model is applieing to get into one of these films. Only thing left is mounting a board canon on the hood LOL.
Regards
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 7th, 2000, 3:26 am

June 5th, 2004, 5:16 pm #3



Theo, I totally agree with your comments on Italian design. Here is an example of the high art back in the "early" 1960s. Notice the almost pefect lines at virtually all areas of the body, including perfect proportiions.

Pretty awesome. Too bad they didn't build one with a 352/360, a 390/401, a 406/405 or of course any number of 428 or 427 variants. In that car, the 353/360 would have been awesome, and anything more would have been outa-this-world !

regards, P
......must be masterpieces too. I don't know much about them. All I know is that they were high sophisticated motors for their days. Alum. blocks, heads and overhead cams was standart on those and some came as 12 cylinders. To be honest I wouldn't swap the originals w. any engine. But having a 427 in one of those is an idea that no one can ignore. These cars probably can't take too much weight. There were many that came with a middle motor, which rounds up this masterpiece concept. I remember this model on the pic above. I once had it as a matchbox die cast model LOL. I also had the Lincoln Continental which was my favourite in my sandbox
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: June 2nd, 2004, 5:15 am

June 6th, 2004, 2:33 am #4



Theo, I totally agree with your comments on Italian design. Here is an example of the high art back in the "early" 1960s. Notice the almost pefect lines at virtually all areas of the body, including perfect proportiions.

Pretty awesome. Too bad they didn't build one with a 352/360, a 390/401, a 406/405 or of course any number of 428 or 427 variants. In that car, the 353/360 would have been awesome, and anything more would have been outa-this-world !

regards, P
I have seen a mid 1960's Ferrari similar to the one in the pic in Australia with a small block Ford V8 fitted. (a 302 I think)Apparently the original V-12 had been destroyed, the asking price was around $35k USD less than half what it would have fetched with the original engine. I considered buying it but it was going to be almost impossible to find an original motor so I bought a V-12 E-Type Jag instead. Was still an interesting concept to use a small block Ford in it though

regards

David
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 7th, 2000, 3:26 am

June 6th, 2004, 8:17 am #5



Theo, I totally agree with your comments on Italian design. Here is an example of the high art back in the "early" 1960s. Notice the almost pefect lines at virtually all areas of the body, including perfect proportiions.

Pretty awesome. Too bad they didn't build one with a 352/360, a 390/401, a 406/405 or of course any number of 428 or 427 variants. In that car, the 353/360 would have been awesome, and anything more would have been outa-this-world !

regards, P
There was this customer taht asked me to rebuild his Iso Rivolta's factory Cleveland. I made him a reasonable budget price just to enjoy working on a nice car, but since he wanted to sell the car, he didn't want to spend even cheap $$. That's been 4 years ago and the car is still rusting its' life away in some shady garage. Some people never get it and I'm not interested anymore.
Looks like there are more Italian beauties made w. primitive power.
Check this
http://www.californiaclassix.com/archiv ... _c107.html

Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 16th, 2000, 4:59 am

June 8th, 2004, 11:49 pm #6



Theo, I totally agree with your comments on Italian design. Here is an example of the high art back in the "early" 1960s. Notice the almost pefect lines at virtually all areas of the body, including perfect proportiions.

Pretty awesome. Too bad they didn't build one with a 352/360, a 390/401, a 406/405 or of course any number of 428 or 427 variants. In that car, the 353/360 would have been awesome, and anything more would have been outa-this-world !

regards, P
Most modern cars look like giant suppositories.

Hey Theo and P! Good to hear from you guys again.

Paul
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 9th, 2001, 10:20 pm

June 9th, 2004, 1:22 am #7




Here's a great looking exotic with a FE powerplant. The AC 428. Everyone should have this kind of fun.

Hey Paul, glad to hear from you too. Hope all is well with you and yours.

P
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 7th, 2000, 3:26 am

June 9th, 2004, 8:38 am #8

Most modern cars look like giant suppositories.

Hey Theo and P! Good to hear from you guys again.

Paul
............I was wondering what you were doing lately. I hoped so much that you guys didn'r burn yourself and the 428 on the stand like you nearly did with the last project. I'm glad to hear that your motor runs good.
I'm very curious how the hard block turns out to behave in normal traffic situations.
It's funny that your hard blocked engines seems to cool a lot better than the last Non H.B. motor.
See you
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 16th, 2000, 4:59 am

June 10th, 2004, 2:45 am #9




Here's a great looking exotic with a FE powerplant. The AC 428. Everyone should have this kind of fun.

Hey Paul, glad to hear from you too. Hope all is well with you and yours.

P
Way cool.

Hey P, Gonna try to be on the forum more often these days. Glad you and Theo and some new guys and some guys from the new forum have been posting over here.

How'z your Porsches and FE's?

Paul
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 16th, 2000, 4:59 am

June 10th, 2004, 2:55 am #10

............I was wondering what you were doing lately. I hoped so much that you guys didn'r burn yourself and the 428 on the stand like you nearly did with the last project. I'm glad to hear that your motor runs good.
I'm very curious how the hard block turns out to behave in normal traffic situations.
It's funny that your hard blocked engines seems to cool a lot better than the last Non H.B. motor.
See you
Not sure I'll ever get a handle on modern life. I'll email ya with the details.

Well, this time I fired the new motor up in the car instead of on a stand. Decided not to go to the engine dyno so in the car it went. As for cooling, I decided my last 428 was really a 390 block bored way too far over. I think that's why it's cooling was marginal. My new block is definitely a 428 and I got custom pistons so I only had to bore as much as it needed and no more. It's 0.025" over at a 4.155" bore. I think that's the key difference between the two 428's rather than the hard blok. As for the ultimate test: 105F Kansas heat in August sitting in traffic we'll have to wait and see. It looks good so far.

How's the T-Bird?

Paul
Quote
Like
Share