Swing Low, Sweet...Seeven Iron

Swing Low, Sweet...Seeven Iron

Joined: September 6th, 2004, 3:46 am

April 25th, 2005, 6:03 pm #1

Or wedge, or driver. I am an inveterate tinkerer and fiddler, though I always stay within the Blake framework. For example, when I experiment with a pre-set, part-way-back address, I still use the reflex swing motion.

A few days ago I began to adjust my takeaway by keeping the clubhead as close to the ground as possible, for as long as possible. Of course, it's probably less than a foot (a guess) that you can do this--anatomy rules. My rationale was that this action would be helpful to executing Mindy's instruction to take the club 'straight back' and to take the lead arm inside the target line minimally (14*). My shots became more solid and more reliable right away so I think there's something there.

What precipitated this for me was, at least partially, a vague memory of something along these lines in Lee Trevino's book, 'Groove Your Swing My Way'. I don't have a copy of the book but it may have been in the chapter on 'Hitting at Ball Level'. Trevino instructed taking the club back low and OUTSIDE the line in the takeaway. He recognized that it could only stay outside the line for a few inches, but believed this important to a correct backswing plane. Blake recommended that the club be taken back on a line 'across the toes'. Since his stance was 45* open, a line across the toes would be a direction that would take the club outside the line, similar to Trevino.

It's possible that Blake intended this very action in the takeaway though I don't find words in either book to this effect. For anyone experimenting with Blake, please try this and report your result here--might be worth your time. SD
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Joined: September 5th, 2004, 1:22 pm

April 26th, 2005, 2:51 am #2

Golf Channel tonight,David Faherty was getting a tip from long-driver Brain Pavlet,who said to take the driver back low and slow to get more width in the swing;thus getting more power.

So, I gees it would work for a 7 iron too

I need to work on taking the ball more along my footline during the backswing;I have a tendency to take it inside.

bdog
Regards,
Bob
Lexington, Ky.
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Joined: September 6th, 2004, 3:46 am

April 27th, 2005, 6:25 pm #3

With my low and slow 'backsweep' I get a more solid feel at impact, not necessarily more clubhead speed, though I suppose the wider arc might well increase clubhead speed. Perhaps there is a more advantageous angle of approach in my downswing. Swing repeatability is definitely improved. SD
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Joined: August 2nd, 2004, 11:57 pm

April 27th, 2005, 6:33 pm #4

of Percy Boomer admonishing to 'stay down to the ball'.
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Joined: September 6th, 2004, 3:46 am

April 28th, 2005, 1:22 pm #5

As I recall from 'On learning Golf' Boomer saw feeling (or being) 'down to the ball' as almost a philosophical concept of golf. I don't claim to know exactly what he meant by it though he was certain it was true. A bit New Age/Michael Murphy ('Golf in the Kingdom') even though the book was published in 1948. It's been a while since I read it so perhaps my memory is embellishing. SD
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Joined: September 5th, 2004, 1:22 pm

April 29th, 2005, 12:40 am #6

Golf Channel tonight,David Faherty was getting a tip from long-driver Brain Pavlet,who said to take the driver back low and slow to get more width in the swing;thus getting more power.

So, I gees it would work for a 7 iron too

I need to work on taking the ball more along my footline during the backswing;I have a tendency to take it inside.

bdog
I played (mostly practiced) yesterday using the swing thought of taking the hands back along the toe line during the initial part of the backswing. To me this feels as if I am swinging like Jim Furyk,with a loop in my swing.I hit the ball solidly and with good distance,especially with my irons. So, I plan on using this swing thought the next time I really play.

Cya,
bdog
Regards,
Bob
Lexington, Ky.
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Joined: September 6th, 2004, 3:46 am

May 2nd, 2005, 3:15 am #7

bdog,
An imaginary line across the toes, with an open stance, would be outside the target line. Do you think it would be of any use, in practice, to draw such a line on the ground (tape or powder) to remind yourself to (try to) swing back (takeaway) outside the target line? I tried this and it does seem to help with takeaway direction, but it can be a bit confusing for the downswing. I suppose you could have two lines--one for takeaway and one representing target line for downswing.

As you take the club back, do you try to keep the clubhead low to the ground? Blake swing = Jim Furyk's loop? Hmmm. SD
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