Sun-Bleached Leaves

Sun-Bleached Leaves

Joined: May 18th, 2013, 9:33 pm

April 15th, 2017, 12:06 am #1

Ive noticed this on plants that have been inside all winter and then went out in full sun. Especially the tomato plant[cherry] which has tomatoes on it and a cuphea schumannii with lots of bleached leaves , guess I should of left them in the shade instead of full sun right away.
Steve W.
Martinsville IN.
Zone 6
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Joined: June 21st, 2006, 1:24 pm

April 15th, 2017, 5:34 am #2

Steve,

Could this actually be from a lack of sun given that the plant is inside all winter with minimal light? Without full sun, many plants cannot make chlorophyll, the substance that makes their leaves green. I would certainly expose these plants to sunlight very slowly and I bet they will green up again in no time!
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Joined: January 10th, 2016, 12:32 am

April 15th, 2017, 11:47 am #3

Ive noticed this on plants that have been inside all winter and then went out in full sun. Especially the tomato plant[cherry] which has tomatoes on it and a cuphea schumannii with lots of bleached leaves , guess I should of left them in the shade instead of full sun right away.
I did the same thing.....sigh.....Springitis I guess. Do I trim it way back?
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Joined: March 5th, 2006, 2:03 am

April 15th, 2017, 12:41 pm #4

Ive noticed this on plants that have been inside all winter and then went out in full sun. Especially the tomato plant[cherry] which has tomatoes on it and a cuphea schumannii with lots of bleached leaves , guess I should of left them in the shade instead of full sun right away.
If there is any green on the leaf it is helping the plant grow it's root system. For young plants I would leave them alone unless you really don't like how they look.
Central Florida 9B
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Joined: September 10th, 2011, 4:19 pm

April 15th, 2017, 1:54 pm #5

Ive noticed this on plants that have been inside all winter and then went out in full sun. Especially the tomato plant[cherry] which has tomatoes on it and a cuphea schumannii with lots of bleached leaves , guess I should of left them in the shade instead of full sun right away.
I zapped a couple of my Cupheas and some Coleus that way. They were put out on cloudy, misty days and were doing fine. Then I went to work and the sun came out. Direct sun and wind are terrible for wintered over plants.
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Joined: July 18th, 2009, 3:58 am

April 15th, 2017, 2:29 pm #6

Ive noticed this on plants that have been inside all winter and then went out in full sun. Especially the tomato plant[cherry] which has tomatoes on it and a cuphea schumannii with lots of bleached leaves , guess I should of left them in the shade instead of full sun right away.
I've certainly done that before.
Dan
East-central Iowa
Zone 5a
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Joined: June 28th, 2014, 12:17 pm

April 15th, 2017, 2:59 pm #7

Ive noticed this on plants that have been inside all winter and then went out in full sun. Especially the tomato plant[cherry] which has tomatoes on it and a cuphea schumannii with lots of bleached leaves , guess I should of left them in the shade instead of full sun right away.
Probably is sunscald, I deal with that a lot down here in Florida. I cover the new plants with laundry baskets for a week or two, until we have an overcast day. This also protects them from too much wind/rain until they have a chance to get established. If the plant is too tall I use a tomato cage to elevate the laundry basket, and top them with a sprinkler head donut to keep the wind from blowing the baskets over.


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Last edited by Tom M on April 15th, 2017, 3:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Tom M
St. Pete, FL
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Joined: May 22nd, 2008, 11:02 am

April 16th, 2017, 2:54 pm #8

Ive noticed this on plants that have been inside all winter and then went out in full sun. Especially the tomato plant[cherry] which has tomatoes on it and a cuphea schumannii with lots of bleached leaves , guess I should of left them in the shade instead of full sun right away.
All my indoor plants go in the shade for a few days, when they first come outside, to avoid sun scalding. Some plant's leaves also get scorched from "unfamiliar" cooler-than-used-to temps too. So mine come out on warms days and go back if the nights are especially cold - but only for a week or less. I grow lots of tropical plants so I have a lot of experience with sun and cold "scalding"...

For my hummingbird flowers coming out, if small enough, I put them in clear plastic bins and put the lids on, on the coldest nights... before planting in the ground a few days / weeks later.
Wilmington, Delaware (USDA Zone 7a)
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Joined: May 18th, 2013, 9:33 pm

April 16th, 2017, 5:41 pm #9

Ive noticed this on plants that have been inside all winter and then went out in full sun. Especially the tomato plant[cherry] which has tomatoes on it and a cuphea schumannii with lots of bleached leaves , guess I should of left them in the shade instead of full sun right away.
I dont normally run into this as most overwintered are in shade for a few days, but in this case with one tomato plant and one schumannii got full sun, big mistake as far as sunburn/ sunscald/ sunbleach/ sunwash/ sunblast/ sunflash/ or whatever else you wish to label it.
Steve W.
Martinsville IN.
Zone 6
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Joined: June 28th, 2014, 12:17 pm

April 17th, 2017, 11:27 am #10

Ive noticed this on plants that have been inside all winter and then went out in full sun. Especially the tomato plant[cherry] which has tomatoes on it and a cuphea schumannii with lots of bleached leaves , guess I should of left them in the shade instead of full sun right away.
It's easy for me to forget how different things are up there, having lived down here most of my life. Everything in my microclimate gets burned without protection initially....
Last edited by Tom M on April 17th, 2017, 9:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Tom M
St. Pete, FL
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