Stack & Tilt

Stack & Tilt

Joined: June 20th, 2005, 10:47 pm

June 13th, 2007, 6:48 pm #1

Most of us have been there. We jump from one method (Simple Swing, Natural Golf, LPG...) to another, searching for that elusive golf swing. I am one of the worse offenders that I know or heard of. Each method had its positive aspects but did not meet our expectations. We needed a swing that was repeatable and can be used for all clubs, putter excluded. I am here to proclaim my final proclamation about a swing method. Stack and Tilt (S&T) is the real deal.

Not only is S&T EXTREMELY easy, but you also got the feeling that the ball was well struck. "Compressing the ball" is how someone defined it. It took me one trip to the range to get the setup and swing in the correct fashion. (So Simple...) After that, I was crushing the ball with every club in my bag, excluding the driver. For me, the driver is taking a little bit more effort to correctly swing the S&T. Remember, this swing is learned from reading the June's Golf Digest article. So, some of the practice required at the driving range is trial and error. There are no experts, DVD's or other medium that will answer your questions to help with the swing.

Below is a link to a forum that describes people's experiences with S&T. If you are having trouble with your swing, give S&T a try. It may be what you have been searching for. And if not, it only costs you a bucket of balls.

http://www.geoffshackelford.com/homepag ... -tilt.html

Aloha
Tim
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Joined: May 11th, 2004, 2:15 am

June 14th, 2007, 5:10 am #2

<P>Haddix forum link at the bottom (as you know) he gives advise based on S&T</P>
<P>&nbsp;</P>
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Joined: May 13th, 2007, 1:30 pm

June 14th, 2007, 1:26 pm #3

Yes, Mr Haddix's forum is a great place to get advice about S&T from a pro. He is very gracious. For the folks don't know who Denver Haddix is, he is a golf pro in Montana that works with PGA golfer(s) and was in the running to qualify for this years U.S Open; by playing S&T!

When I was referring there are no experts, I meant local, meaning your golf pro at your favorite course. Unless, things have quickly changed, I am assuming the swing is too new to be adopted by instructors.

Curious, "As you know" Gerry? Why was your posted edited?
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Joined: September 5th, 2004, 1:22 pm

June 14th, 2007, 1:59 pm #4

I believe Denver considers Andy Plummer his coach,as Denver has worked with him for several years. He probably won't tell you,but Denver CAN PLAY. He is a GREAT guy,loves the game and likes helping people. He just needs more hours in the day

http://www.network54.com/Forum/562030/
Regards,
Bob
Lexington, Ky.
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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

June 14th, 2007, 3:01 pm #5

Most of us have been there. We jump from one method (Simple Swing, Natural Golf, LPG...) to another, searching for that elusive golf swing. I am one of the worse offenders that I know or heard of. Each method had its positive aspects but did not meet our expectations. We needed a swing that was repeatable and can be used for all clubs, putter excluded. I am here to proclaim my final proclamation about a swing method. Stack and Tilt (S&T) is the real deal.

Not only is S&T EXTREMELY easy, but you also got the feeling that the ball was well struck. "Compressing the ball" is how someone defined it. It took me one trip to the range to get the setup and swing in the correct fashion. (So Simple...) After that, I was crushing the ball with every club in my bag, excluding the driver. For me, the driver is taking a little bit more effort to correctly swing the S&T. Remember, this swing is learned from reading the June's Golf Digest article. So, some of the practice required at the driving range is trial and error. There are no experts, DVD's or other medium that will answer your questions to help with the swing.

Below is a link to a forum that describes people's experiences with S&T. If you are having trouble with your swing, give S&T a try. It may be what you have been searching for. And if not, it only costs you a bucket of balls.

http://www.geoffshackelford.com/homepag ... -tilt.html

Aloha
Tim
What it feels like- how steep do you go with your left shoulder- Does it feel like a reverse pivot- Does it
hurt your lower back when you stand up through the shot?

Bob Jones said he straightened his trail leg at the
top- that means not weight shift correct?

S-T seems like a swing that brings together all
the things the golf experts have said were wrong.
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Joined: May 13th, 2007, 1:30 pm

June 14th, 2007, 4:32 pm #6

My experiences with S&T can be summed up with one word. EASY. It is just plain easy. I have a body type alot like Ernie Els. I am 6'3, 220 lbs. A pro once said that I swing sort of like Els and I have smooth motion. Heck, my score is similiar to Ernie's. Except his score is for 18 holes while mine is for nine.

There are far better experts than me that can dispute golf teachings and golf statements. At my level, I can only offer suggestions. Read the article carefully. Go to the range and buy one bucket of balls. Try to follow the setup and swing stated in the magazine. And I bet by the end of the bucket, you will feel the compression and straight ball flight that so many have stated using the S&T.

How I hit with S&T.
- Line up o the ball with 65% of weight on the lead side. This will make your shoulders are almost square and align with one another. Less weight on the lead side for the wood clubs.
- on the start of the backswing, FEEL like your dipping your lead shoulder towards your lead toe, having your arms glued to your body. This will angle your backswing and automatically straighten the trail leg. This will put a little more weight on the lead side. If your weight has swayed to the trail side, STOP!, if you can and start over.
- At the top of the backswing. Step on your lead foot as though you are stepping on a bug. This causes you to uncoil and start the downswing. Hands and arms are completely out of the swing. It took me more than a couple times at the range before I felt comfortable with this idea.
- Straighen up at impact. Since your back swing FEELS like it is only a half swing and clubhead travels two thirds distance than the normal swing, the club head as less distance to travel to the target.
- Watch ball as it goes straight to the intended target. I expect this to happen at all times. If the ball slices or hooks, I know I must have done something very wrong. I can almost know immediately know what I did to hit a poor shot because you remember things such as too much weight on my trail side or shoulders were not aligned correctly. Bad shots basically comes down to aligning up sloppily and not paying attention, for me anyways.

I believe any body type can use this swing. Mr Chazman may feel perfectly comfortable at setup. But, the man plays in the low 80's so he is better palyer than me by at least 6 strokes... at this time. I do plan on playing better. NO, I expect to play better.

I have a bad back and I find it is no more taxing than the convential two plane swing. If anything, I have less backaches at the end of the game. Perhaps the reason is I don't try to swing hard with S&T.

Do I think this swing is for everyone? NO way! But, what is the harm in trying? Read testimonies in the attached link above. Read Mr. Haddix's forum. Beside being a "class" act, Denver Haddix actually uses and teaches PGA pros this swing.

Aloha

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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

June 14th, 2007, 8:49 pm #7

Thanks for the detailed description of your experience.
Think I'll print it out and take it to the range tomorrow.

-Heck, my score is similar to Ernie's. Except his score is for 18 holes while mine is for nine.-

Good one No Moe - such humor is much appreciated at
Mr Chazman's forearm- you can get away with a lot
OF shenanigans here. THANKS again for taking the time
to post your experience.

JC

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Joined: May 13th, 2007, 1:30 pm

June 14th, 2007, 9:12 pm #8

Forget to mention one point that is very, very important. Your hands on the takeaway come deep inside. Rather than straight back in conventional swing, the hands come more toward your trail front hip. Also, remember to keep your hands and arms out of the swing.

I went to the range at lunch. I was hitting every club great except the driver. Hitting? More like crushing the ball! My five iron was 190. The driver was just average. I was hitting my 5 wood well over 200 yds in the air (no roll). That is about only 30 yds shorter than my driver.

With the roll, a fairway wood would have me sitting more in the fairway plus a chance to attack the pin more. I really should think about playing smart and buy a decent three wood and tee off with it. Because with this swing, you can really hit with your irons. So what if I am 20 yds shorter than the average drive? I will be sitting in the fairway attacking the flag more.

Good luck with the swing. I am sure you will not be dissappointed.
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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

June 15th, 2007, 2:24 am #9

your experience with S&T to his attention-
It's so new he may not have tried it yet.

You mentioned that you didn't get the results
you wanted with your Driver.
A couple of others guys who have tried S&T have said
the same thing. The S&T swing seems to be steep
and narrow with not much of a flat spot-not so good for a driver
Maybe a wider stance or different ball position
would make a difference- Maybe the Driver has
been discussed on Denver's forum- have to check.

NO MOE Thanks for the additional info- will give it a
go at the range A.S.A.P.

NO MOE you are on the ball- just went to Denver's site
and see you got some suggestions from Denver.


JC
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Joined: May 13th, 2007, 1:30 pm

June 15th, 2007, 2:35 pm #10

I am going thru an experiment with the driver. Yesterday, I was at Golf Galaxy when I spied a Titleist 983k driver. As most of you know, Titleist make good drivers but there are not for average players with mid/ high handicaps... like me. I have read that 983k driver is really straight and long as long as you hit it dead center. There is not much room for error. The driver was for $50. I can return it to Golf Galaxy in 30 days and get store credit.

I bought the driver for two specific reasons. Will the S&T swing be more consistent on the swing path and allow you to hit it on the screws more often? Because I believe this driver will tell you if you mi****. And, will the smaller head work more consistently than the 460cc monsters? For the conventional swing, the ball should be hit on the start of the upswing path, more on the upper part of the head. That is what I was told and read about my Callaway 454, anyway. Since the S&T swing is slightly different than a CG swing with more of a steeper angle of attack, I thought a larger (460cc) head size may hurt more than help.

A disclaimer. I am not here to refute anyone's claims or theorys. I am here to talk about a golf swing. Perhaps this swing may help that one person who wants to enjoy the game more. As I have said before, I think this swing is not for everyone. But if you are curious, give it a try. It is very easy to learn and the only thing it could cost you is a few bucks for range balls and couple of hours.

Good luck!


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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

June 16th, 2007, 1:48 pm #11

It's easy to read an article about S&T, but
i wonder if i could pick your brain a bit
more about the sensations you experienced
with S&T- I know everyone feels things differently,
but your input would be appreciated.
( I think the above is an example of using
a lot of words without saying much.

The swing feels so different from anything
i have tried before.

1. On the back swing do you feel like you are
making a reverse pivot?

2.Does your lead knee point straight out
from you instead of pointing towards the
ball at the top of your swing?

3. Does your back- trail leg feel like
your knee locks- Do you feel like you
stiffen it that much?

4. Do you feel any weight transfer to your
trail side at all?

5. on the down swing they say to stand up
through the ball- Does it hurt your back?

When i first tried S&T, I felt like a beginning
golfer- like I was doing every thing wrong.

JC


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Joined: May 13th, 2007, 1:30 pm

June 16th, 2007, 3:34 pm #12

Saw this while drinking the morning coffee. I will try to answer your questions, hoping I don’t muddy the meaning.

Back swing. I picked up my pitching wedge. By setting up and swinging the club, I feel as though I have 60-65% weight on the lead foot at setup. On the backswing, weight is added to the lead foot to about 80-85%. The trail leg straightens but does not lock the knee. I would never consciously “lock” my knee in this swing or any other athletic move. I learned that early in life when I was in the military at basic training. I use to see guys pass out all the time during formation because they were “locking” their knees during attention.

Lead knee. The lead knee points inward, not straight out. How far inward will depend how steep is your lead shoulder is in the backswing. Since I tend to over exaggerate positions and moves when learning a new method, I try to limit all moves and just relax with my S&T swing. The lead shoulder will be lower than the trail in the back swing.

Weight transfer. Any weight transfer to the trail side is a clear indication that something is very wrong with your S&T swing. If your arms or hands creep into the swing, it could lead to very poor shots. People experiences on the link below agree with these two statements.

http://www.geoffshackelford.com/homepag ... -tilt.html

back pain. My first try with S&T worried me because I felt a back twinge after the range. I actually quit experimenting with S&T after playing one time with it and went back to swinging conventional because of the pain. After reading comments from the link above, I saw where a medical doctor posted his thought on back pain and golf. I went back to S&T and notice some of the pain was due to muscles never been used in the swing before. By relaxing with this swing, I now find out that it is actually less taxing on my back. Standing up at impact should not be exaggerated. Rather, it should feel more natural.

Feeling like a beginner. I think that a one plane type swinger would adjust more easily than a two plane swinger. Because I feel that S&T is a modified version of a one plane swing. You just don’t shift your weight to the trail side. I was a two plane swinger and it also felt odd to me. After awhile, I now feel very comfortable and natural with it.

Arms and hands. On the backswing, the hands should never go any higher (roughly) than your ear for an eight iron hit. If it does, it is probably because you are detaching your arms from your body, like a two plane swing.

On the back swing, when my lead shoulder touches my chin, that is far enough. I don’t need any more twisting action to get power out of the swing. One time, I was viewing a video of A. Baddeley swinging and it looked choppy to me. I told Mr Haddix that it look like Aaron Baddeley is hardly swinging. He reassured me that he is one of the longer iron hitters and his distance is plenty. A.Baddeley is currently tied for third in the US Open. When did he get game? When he starting swinging S&T!

Perhaps it may take more than one trip to the range to determine if the swing is right for you. If you still are unsure, you can always try it again at a latter time.

Good luck!
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Joined: May 11th, 2004, 2:15 am

June 16th, 2007, 4:33 pm #13

Yes, Mr Haddix's forum is a great place to get advice about S&T from a pro. He is very gracious. For the folks don't know who Denver Haddix is, he is a golf pro in Montana that works with PGA golfer(s) and was in the running to qualify for this years U.S Open; by playing S&T!

When I was referring there are no experts, I meant local, meaning your golf pro at your favorite course. Unless, things have quickly changed, I am assuming the swing is too new to be adopted by instructors.

Curious, "As you know" Gerry? Why was your posted edited?
.
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Joined: September 5th, 2004, 1:22 pm

June 17th, 2007, 3:22 pm #14

And,it's nice to be able to edit your own message after you discover a "missteak."

ieSpell for Internet Explorer;it's a FREE add-on:

http://www.download.com/3000-2378-10208 ... tag=button
Regards,
Bob
Lexington, Ky.
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Joined: September 5th, 2004, 1:22 pm

June 17th, 2007, 3:31 pm #15

Most of us have been there. We jump from one method (Simple Swing, Natural Golf, LPG...) to another, searching for that elusive golf swing. I am one of the worse offenders that I know or heard of. Each method had its positive aspects but did not meet our expectations. We needed a swing that was repeatable and can be used for all clubs, putter excluded. I am here to proclaim my final proclamation about a swing method. Stack and Tilt (S&T) is the real deal.

Not only is S&T EXTREMELY easy, but you also got the feeling that the ball was well struck. "Compressing the ball" is how someone defined it. It took me one trip to the range to get the setup and swing in the correct fashion. (So Simple...) After that, I was crushing the ball with every club in my bag, excluding the driver. For me, the driver is taking a little bit more effort to correctly swing the S&T. Remember, this swing is learned from reading the June's Golf Digest article. So, some of the practice required at the driving range is trial and error. There are no experts, DVD's or other medium that will answer your questions to help with the swing.

Below is a link to a forum that describes people's experiences with S&T. If you are having trouble with your swing, give S&T a try. It may be what you have been searching for. And if not, it only costs you a bucket of balls.

http://www.geoffshackelford.com/homepag ... -tilt.html

Aloha
Tim
His coach is Andy Plummer:

<embed src="http://www.golfdigest.com/video/stackandtilt_finch.wmv" autostart="true">
Regards,
Bob
Lexington, Ky.
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