Seed starting 2013

Seed starting 2013

Joined: October 18th, 2005, 8:20 pm

February 2nd, 2013, 11:04 am #1

We've been doing a seed starting log for the past few years. I find it valuable as a reminder of the progress make during the propagation season. It helps to avoid mistakes like planting zinnias and coccinea too early and to properly time grow-outs. Too often we've seen new excited gardeners start plants too early and find themselves wondering what to do with their overgrown seedlings in March.

Generally the easiest way to handle a seed starting log here is to use the edit button and update one page as the season progresses. Later, lets say next winter, it is much easier to reference all the information from one place, one page. The important dates I use are: date of sowing, germination, first true leaves, date of transplant, finisted date.

It also is worth mentioning on the page what the seed starting conditions are. Are plants being grown under lights, is there bottom heat and so forth.

Not as many of us are participating in these logs, cuttings and seed start, as there were a few years ago. Oh well, even if few others don't see the value of it I do.
Last edited by WardDa on February 2nd, 2013, 11:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 18th, 2005, 8:20 pm

February 2nd, 2013, 11:29 am #2

This year I am trying something a little different. For the past 30 years I have sow all my seeds under lights with bottom heat in the basement - a rather cool place. This winter I brought up a set of shoplights and hung them from kitchen cabinets over a spare counter. A friend sent me a few seeds of rare types of guaranitica and I want them to have ideal conditions to sprout since there is no room for error. Sitting on the counter are two standard cell pack trays and on one side a heat mat is sandwiched between two trays. It is very warm and cozy.

Generally I only start a few plant types this early. Usually the types are Agastache, Salvia microphylla and similar plants that take a long time to reach planting stage. This year it is mostly the guaranitica. These plants need to be out of the way, down under lights in the basement, when the main seed starting time begins in March. Filling every indoor growing space and having the plants tumble out the door at exactly planting time is always a challenge.

Salvia guaranitica Santa Maria - sown Jan 27, failed
Salvia guaranitica Catamarca - sown Jan 27, failed
Salvia rhindsina - sown Jan 27, failed
Salvia azura (10 year old seed) - sown Jan 27,failed

I am not sure whether there was any viable seed in the above mix.

Pepper Jalapeno - year old seed sown 3/2, germination 3/9 - seperated into cells 3/29 - 16 plants
Pepper Aji Cristal - sown 3/16
Pepper Ancho - sown 3/16
Tomato Dester - sown 3/16, seperated into cells 3/29
Tomato OTV - sown 3/16, seperated into cells 3/29
Tomato Federle - sown 3/16, seperated into cells 3/29
Tomato Italian Heirloom - sown 3/16, seperated into cell 3/29
Agastache foeniculum - sown 3/16, just setting first true leaves 3/29, 108 into cells 4/7
Salvia subrotunda Alba - sown 3/29, germination 4/7
Salvia Yvonne's - sown 3/29, germination 4/5
Gailardia - sown 3/39, germination 4/4
Calendula - sown 3/29, germination 4/5
Last edited by WardDa on April 7th, 2013, 10:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

February 2nd, 2013, 3:21 pm #3

We've been doing a seed starting log for the past few years. I find it valuable as a reminder of the progress make during the propagation season. It helps to avoid mistakes like planting zinnias and coccinea too early and to properly time grow-outs. Too often we've seen new excited gardeners start plants too early and find themselves wondering what to do with their overgrown seedlings in March.

Generally the easiest way to handle a seed starting log here is to use the edit button and update one page as the season progresses. Later, lets say next winter, it is much easier to reference all the information from one place, one page. The important dates I use are: date of sowing, germination, first true leaves, date of transplant, finisted date.

It also is worth mentioning on the page what the seed starting conditions are. Are plants being grown under lights, is there bottom heat and so forth.

Not as many of us are participating in these logs, cuttings and seed start, as there were a few years ago. Oh well, even if few others don't see the value of it I do.
Well I haven't even thought about starting seeds yet which is ok since most of what I have will be easy to start salvias. It is hard to think about seed starting just yet as I look out the window at the 6+ inches of fresh snow and it is still coming down YUK!

For those newbies that aren't quite sure how to keep a running tab, this is how I do mine:

Jan. 1:
Salvia coccinea Lady in red - germinated 4 days
(then I come back to my same post and edit it to add to this same post every time I sow more seeds)

January 15:
Salvia coccinea Coral Nymph- under lights -germinated 7 days
Cuphea schumannii - in south window -germinated 2 weeks
salvia Black and Blue - in filtered light germinated 2 weeks

Feb. 15
Agastache rupestris - in south window
Lobelia cardinalis - in filtered light
Lobelia syphylitica - in filtered light
Silene virginia - in filtered light

This is just an example. By going back into your own original post it keeps the number of posts down in the original thread and easier for individuals to see their own seed progress without having to scan several posts.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6a
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: January 27th, 2007, 6:24 am

February 2nd, 2013, 3:30 pm #4

We've been doing a seed starting log for the past few years. I find it valuable as a reminder of the progress make during the propagation season. It helps to avoid mistakes like planting zinnias and coccinea too early and to properly time grow-outs. Too often we've seen new excited gardeners start plants too early and find themselves wondering what to do with their overgrown seedlings in March.

Generally the easiest way to handle a seed starting log here is to use the edit button and update one page as the season progresses. Later, lets say next winter, it is much easier to reference all the information from one place, one page. The important dates I use are: date of sowing, germination, first true leaves, date of transplant, finisted date.

It also is worth mentioning on the page what the seed starting conditions are. Are plants being grown under lights, is there bottom heat and so forth.

Not as many of us are participating in these logs, cuttings and seed start, as there were a few years ago. Oh well, even if few others don't see the value of it I do.
As a rule I dont start any seed before March 1 but there is an exception this year. I have standing cypress from last season the orange variety but I wanted the red so a generous member supplied me with seed in hopes of these being red.

Ipomopsis Rubra--- Started Jan 23rd-- seed sprouted quickly within a couple of days
details------------under shoplights no bottom heat, 2" from light

Last edited by Stevenindy on February 2nd, 2013, 3:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 18th, 2010, 1:36 pm

February 2nd, 2013, 9:17 pm #5

We've been doing a seed starting log for the past few years. I find it valuable as a reminder of the progress make during the propagation season. It helps to avoid mistakes like planting zinnias and coccinea too early and to properly time grow-outs. Too often we've seen new excited gardeners start plants too early and find themselves wondering what to do with their overgrown seedlings in March.

Generally the easiest way to handle a seed starting log here is to use the edit button and update one page as the season progresses. Later, lets say next winter, it is much easier to reference all the information from one place, one page. The important dates I use are: date of sowing, germination, first true leaves, date of transplant, finisted date.

It also is worth mentioning on the page what the seed starting conditions are. Are plants being grown under lights, is there bottom heat and so forth.

Not as many of us are participating in these logs, cuttings and seed start, as there were a few years ago. Oh well, even if few others don't see the value of it I do.
Thanks for getting the ball rolling, Ward! I was just thinking about seed starting. I certainly appreciated yours (and everyone's) advice last year when I started and learned a lot!!! I had hoped to do some cuttings this past fall, but all of them had perished (essentially I started them too late). I don't have an ambitious array of seeds planned for this year like last, but I will be doing some salvias (and much later zinnias!), and will try again with hibiscus.

One of the techniques that worked really well for me was the baggy method! I have to go back and review my personal logs and saved links now. Another thing that worked really well for me was the use of the Jiffy pellets. I marked the outside of them with sharpies and kept them growing in a nice plant tray. Those were cool because I had bought a bunch of the "window" seed starting kits. You could fill up each tray with a particular kind of seed and move them or adjust the humidity when they achieved their true leaves.

It was great to have plants in my garden and patio that I started from seed! What a feeling of accomplishment it gives you! Especially to see the plant grow big and healthy and have hummers feeding from it!



Caro
SE PA, Zone 6b
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Joined: April 17th, 2011, 3:58 pm

February 4th, 2013, 11:58 am #6

We've been doing a seed starting log for the past few years. I find it valuable as a reminder of the progress make during the propagation season. It helps to avoid mistakes like planting zinnias and coccinea too early and to properly time grow-outs. Too often we've seen new excited gardeners start plants too early and find themselves wondering what to do with their overgrown seedlings in March.

Generally the easiest way to handle a seed starting log here is to use the edit button and update one page as the season progresses. Later, lets say next winter, it is much easier to reference all the information from one place, one page. The important dates I use are: date of sowing, germination, first true leaves, date of transplant, finisted date.

It also is worth mentioning on the page what the seed starting conditions are. Are plants being grown under lights, is there bottom heat and so forth.

Not as many of us are participating in these logs, cuttings and seed start, as there were a few years ago. Oh well, even if few others don't see the value of it I do.
I started some salvia. Coral nympth, upright peru, chiffon, jeweled pink and lavender.
I tried cuphea but have had no luck so far. Seeds from two different sources. Nothing as germinated.....Have no idea what I am doing wrong.
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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

February 4th, 2013, 3:06 pm #7

We've been doing a seed starting log for the past few years. I find it valuable as a reminder of the progress make during the propagation season. It helps to avoid mistakes like planting zinnias and coccinea too early and to properly time grow-outs. Too often we've seen new excited gardeners start plants too early and find themselves wondering what to do with their overgrown seedlings in March.

Generally the easiest way to handle a seed starting log here is to use the edit button and update one page as the season progresses. Later, lets say next winter, it is much easier to reference all the information from one place, one page. The important dates I use are: date of sowing, germination, first true leaves, date of transplant, finisted date.

It also is worth mentioning on the page what the seed starting conditions are. Are plants being grown under lights, is there bottom heat and so forth.

Not as many of us are participating in these logs, cuttings and seed start, as there were a few years ago. Oh well, even if few others don't see the value of it I do.
Kerry,
Sometimes Cupheas can take a while. For me germination can be inconsistant so don't give up just yet.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6a
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: May 18th, 2010, 1:36 pm

February 5th, 2013, 4:03 am #8

We've been doing a seed starting log for the past few years. I find it valuable as a reminder of the progress make during the propagation season. It helps to avoid mistakes like planting zinnias and coccinea too early and to properly time grow-outs. Too often we've seen new excited gardeners start plants too early and find themselves wondering what to do with their overgrown seedlings in March.

Generally the easiest way to handle a seed starting log here is to use the edit button and update one page as the season progresses. Later, lets say next winter, it is much easier to reference all the information from one place, one page. The important dates I use are: date of sowing, germination, first true leaves, date of transplant, finisted date.

It also is worth mentioning on the page what the seed starting conditions are. Are plants being grown under lights, is there bottom heat and so forth.

Not as many of us are participating in these logs, cuttings and seed start, as there were a few years ago. Oh well, even if few others don't see the value of it I do.
Kerry - do your seeds have a heat source whether it be from a seed starting mat, a light source or the top of your fridge (though I caution you to remove from the top of the fridge as soon as the seeds sprout!)?

Last year after much trial and error, I had great success with the "baggie method". While I haven't started my seeds for this year yet, that is what I plan to do this time. It was just so fast and easy...http://www.bbbseed.com/_blog/The_Dirt/p ... ie_Method/

Caro
SE PA, Zone 6b
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Joined: October 18th, 2005, 8:20 pm

February 5th, 2013, 2:46 pm #9

We've been doing a seed starting log for the past few years. I find it valuable as a reminder of the progress make during the propagation season. It helps to avoid mistakes like planting zinnias and coccinea too early and to properly time grow-outs. Too often we've seen new excited gardeners start plants too early and find themselves wondering what to do with their overgrown seedlings in March.

Generally the easiest way to handle a seed starting log here is to use the edit button and update one page as the season progresses. Later, lets say next winter, it is much easier to reference all the information from one place, one page. The important dates I use are: date of sowing, germination, first true leaves, date of transplant, finisted date.

It also is worth mentioning on the page what the seed starting conditions are. Are plants being grown under lights, is there bottom heat and so forth.

Not as many of us are participating in these logs, cuttings and seed start, as there were a few years ago. Oh well, even if few others don't see the value of it I do.
Unless you are in the deep deep south I would hold off planting Salvia coccinea Coral Nymph for another couple of months. They grow very fast.
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Joined: July 18th, 2009, 3:58 am

February 5th, 2013, 3:40 pm #10

We've been doing a seed starting log for the past few years. I find it valuable as a reminder of the progress make during the propagation season. It helps to avoid mistakes like planting zinnias and coccinea too early and to properly time grow-outs. Too often we've seen new excited gardeners start plants too early and find themselves wondering what to do with their overgrown seedlings in March.

Generally the easiest way to handle a seed starting log here is to use the edit button and update one page as the season progresses. Later, lets say next winter, it is much easier to reference all the information from one place, one page. The important dates I use are: date of sowing, germination, first true leaves, date of transplant, finisted date.

It also is worth mentioning on the page what the seed starting conditions are. Are plants being grown under lights, is there bottom heat and so forth.

Not as many of us are participating in these logs, cuttings and seed start, as there were a few years ago. Oh well, even if few others don't see the value of it I do.
This year I'm not sowing any seeds until April 1st. Last year the coccineas and subrotunda grew so fast under my shoplight they were ready for planting too early. The subrotundas, especially, became rootbound in the yogurt cups and began deteriorating.

Dan
Zone 5
East-central Iowa

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Last edited by hawkeye_wx on February 5th, 2013, 6:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Dan
East-central Iowa
Zone 5a
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