Rooting cuttings

Rooting cuttings

Joined: January 26th, 2008, 10:36 pm

July 10th, 2012, 4:01 am #1

I stuck about 8 cuttings of Black and Blue Salvia in some potting soil. About half have rooted and are now producing leaves.

I gave up on rooting roses in water. It didn't work. So I tried again using soil instead and about half the cuttings have formed roots. I am still waiting to see if Don Juan rooted. The other two climbing species of roses did root as well. I'm so excited!!!

I had also stuck some Pipevine cuttings in water and they root as well. I've potted them up.

And I've got some Brug cuttings rooting in water, too!

Spent the weekend cleaning out my small container ponds. Repotted the waterlilies and divided some of them. Found out I still have mosquito fish alive. I had lost most of them during the winter because the pond surface froze over one cold night. Seems a few did survive and produced lots of babies! LOL! Cleaning those ponds is a messy job! Thank goodness I only have to do it once a year.

So it seems that some plants root fine in water, but most seem to do better in potting mix.

What do you take cuttings of to root? And how do you root them in ... in water or soil?

~Becky~

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Joined: April 22nd, 2012, 5:48 pm

July 10th, 2012, 4:26 am #2

Great!!

Apparently hydrogen peroxide is good for taking cuttings. It's my new answer for everything. But seriously it's suppose to work. I'm going to have to try it out.

I normally root cuttings in soil.

Linsey
MN
USDA hardiness zone 4b
Heat zone 5
Sunset zone 43
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Henderson ... 5821426493
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Joined: February 10th, 2012, 11:28 pm

July 10th, 2012, 9:09 am #3

I stuck about 8 cuttings of Black and Blue Salvia in some potting soil. About half have rooted and are now producing leaves.

I gave up on rooting roses in water. It didn't work. So I tried again using soil instead and about half the cuttings have formed roots. I am still waiting to see if Don Juan rooted. The other two climbing species of roses did root as well. I'm so excited!!!

I had also stuck some Pipevine cuttings in water and they root as well. I've potted them up.

And I've got some Brug cuttings rooting in water, too!

Spent the weekend cleaning out my small container ponds. Repotted the waterlilies and divided some of them. Found out I still have mosquito fish alive. I had lost most of them during the winter because the pond surface froze over one cold night. Seems a few did survive and produced lots of babies! LOL! Cleaning those ponds is a messy job! Thank goodness I only have to do it once a year.

So it seems that some plants root fine in water, but most seem to do better in potting mix.

What do you take cuttings of to root? And how do you root them in ... in water or soil?

~Becky~

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Interesting thread. I have rooted a lot of plants in water. I have found water rooted cuttings to be as healthy as "soil-based" rooted cuttings after being potted. This leads me to believe the possibility that the horror stories of inferior water roots could be "overblown". With limited trials, I have not had any success with roses in water although it is possible. Some plants seem to root better in water. Good examples are Cuphea micropetala and Odontonema strictum which root in two weeks or less. Cuphea "David Verity" takes a little while longer. I have successfully rooted cuttings of most of my plants in water at certain times of the year. Admittedly, most of those root better in a soil-based rooting medium.

My favorite soil-based rooting mediums are 50/50 perlite/peat moss and the old standby 100 percent sand which gets much too heavy to move about. Rooting cuttings is way too much fun and leads to addiction. Then there are all those hundreds of newly propagated plants which need to be used or disposed of in some useful manner. It's a vicious cycle; interest of hummingbirds leads to obsession of attracting more hummingbirds which leads to interest of gardening hummingbird plants which leads to obsession of collecting hummingbird plants which leads to interest in propagating hummingbird plants which leads to overabundance of hummingbird plants which leads to abundance of hummingbirds! Whats next?

Jim
zone 8b (used to be 8a)
south Georgia (lost somewhere in between Macon and Valdosta and still rambling on about hummingbirds)
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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

July 10th, 2012, 9:50 am #4

I stuck about 8 cuttings of Black and Blue Salvia in some potting soil. About half have rooted and are now producing leaves.

I gave up on rooting roses in water. It didn't work. So I tried again using soil instead and about half the cuttings have formed roots. I am still waiting to see if Don Juan rooted. The other two climbing species of roses did root as well. I'm so excited!!!

I had also stuck some Pipevine cuttings in water and they root as well. I've potted them up.

And I've got some Brug cuttings rooting in water, too!

Spent the weekend cleaning out my small container ponds. Repotted the waterlilies and divided some of them. Found out I still have mosquito fish alive. I had lost most of them during the winter because the pond surface froze over one cold night. Seems a few did survive and produced lots of babies! LOL! Cleaning those ponds is a messy job! Thank goodness I only have to do it once a year.

So it seems that some plants root fine in water, but most seem to do better in potting mix.

What do you take cuttings of to root? And how do you root them in ... in water or soil?

~Becky~

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I like to root Cupheas in water. I can keep a watchful eye as the roots form and get them potted up quickly. I don't have to watch the soil moisture or worry about them drying out. Sinningias and most salvias I have better success with in soil. Cuttings of shrubs like Weigelia and Buddleia I put directly in the soil in a shady damp area.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6a
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: August 25th, 2007, 3:30 am

July 10th, 2012, 11:07 am #5

I stuck about 8 cuttings of Black and Blue Salvia in some potting soil. About half have rooted and are now producing leaves.

I gave up on rooting roses in water. It didn't work. So I tried again using soil instead and about half the cuttings have formed roots. I am still waiting to see if Don Juan rooted. The other two climbing species of roses did root as well. I'm so excited!!!

I had also stuck some Pipevine cuttings in water and they root as well. I've potted them up.

And I've got some Brug cuttings rooting in water, too!

Spent the weekend cleaning out my small container ponds. Repotted the waterlilies and divided some of them. Found out I still have mosquito fish alive. I had lost most of them during the winter because the pond surface froze over one cold night. Seems a few did survive and produced lots of babies! LOL! Cleaning those ponds is a messy job! Thank goodness I only have to do it once a year.

So it seems that some plants root fine in water, but most seem to do better in potting mix.

What do you take cuttings of to root? And how do you root them in ... in water or soil?

~Becky~

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Jim,

I heartily concur on Odontonema (Firespike) - I can't think of anything easier to root in water. When we're trying to trap a winter hummer that isn't using a feeder, we often will clip a few stalks of firespike and put them in a vase of water inside the trap; Once we're done for the day, the vase's contents often become cuttings to give to the hummer host so they can add the plant to their gardens.

Kevin Morgan
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
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Joined: June 28th, 2012, 2:34 am

July 10th, 2012, 11:37 am #6

I stuck about 8 cuttings of Black and Blue Salvia in some potting soil. About half have rooted and are now producing leaves.

I gave up on rooting roses in water. It didn't work. So I tried again using soil instead and about half the cuttings have formed roots. I am still waiting to see if Don Juan rooted. The other two climbing species of roses did root as well. I'm so excited!!!

I had also stuck some Pipevine cuttings in water and they root as well. I've potted them up.

And I've got some Brug cuttings rooting in water, too!

Spent the weekend cleaning out my small container ponds. Repotted the waterlilies and divided some of them. Found out I still have mosquito fish alive. I had lost most of them during the winter because the pond surface froze over one cold night. Seems a few did survive and produced lots of babies! LOL! Cleaning those ponds is a messy job! Thank goodness I only have to do it once a year.

So it seems that some plants root fine in water, but most seem to do better in potting mix.

What do you take cuttings of to root? And how do you root them in ... in water or soil?

~Becky~

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Porterweed roots fast and cuphea llavea(although I haven't had success with hummers, I love the plant and want to keep it around). I had no luck with black and blue but perhaps I didn't wait long enough. I have Phlox in water right now and a couple stems of coral nymph that broke off during planting but not sure if they will root.

I haven't tried to root anything in soil yet. I'm new to this and keep reading about rooting hormone which I haven't been able to find. Maybe I'll try black and blue since Becky had luck with them.

Leah
Ocala, Fl
Zone 8B
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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

July 10th, 2012, 11:45 am #7

I stuck about 8 cuttings of Black and Blue Salvia in some potting soil. About half have rooted and are now producing leaves.

I gave up on rooting roses in water. It didn't work. So I tried again using soil instead and about half the cuttings have formed roots. I am still waiting to see if Don Juan rooted. The other two climbing species of roses did root as well. I'm so excited!!!

I had also stuck some Pipevine cuttings in water and they root as well. I've potted them up.

And I've got some Brug cuttings rooting in water, too!

Spent the weekend cleaning out my small container ponds. Repotted the waterlilies and divided some of them. Found out I still have mosquito fish alive. I had lost most of them during the winter because the pond surface froze over one cold night. Seems a few did survive and produced lots of babies! LOL! Cleaning those ponds is a messy job! Thank goodness I only have to do it once a year.

So it seems that some plants root fine in water, but most seem to do better in potting mix.

What do you take cuttings of to root? And how do you root them in ... in water or soil?

~Becky~

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Click for weather forecast</span>
I have never had luck rooting Black & Blue in water. the stems always turn black. I have the best luck with black and blue directly in the ground in a shady spot of the garden that stays naturally moist even then I have to tent the cuttings to keep the humidity up around the cuttings.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6a
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: January 26th, 2008, 10:36 pm

July 11th, 2012, 2:05 am #8

I stuck about 8 cuttings of Black and Blue Salvia in some potting soil. About half have rooted and are now producing leaves.

I gave up on rooting roses in water. It didn't work. So I tried again using soil instead and about half the cuttings have formed roots. I am still waiting to see if Don Juan rooted. The other two climbing species of roses did root as well. I'm so excited!!!

I had also stuck some Pipevine cuttings in water and they root as well. I've potted them up.

And I've got some Brug cuttings rooting in water, too!

Spent the weekend cleaning out my small container ponds. Repotted the waterlilies and divided some of them. Found out I still have mosquito fish alive. I had lost most of them during the winter because the pond surface froze over one cold night. Seems a few did survive and produced lots of babies! LOL! Cleaning those ponds is a messy job! Thank goodness I only have to do it once a year.

So it seems that some plants root fine in water, but most seem to do better in potting mix.

What do you take cuttings of to root? And how do you root them in ... in water or soil?

~Becky~

<span style="width:164px;text-align:center;font-family:sans-serif;font-size:12px;">
Click for weather forecast</span>
That's really exciting how many of you have had success with plants I hadn't thought of. Thanks for the heads up on those!

Kevin - I agree with you ... Firespike is the easiest I've ever rooted in water. Brugmansia comes next.

Leah - You got Porterweed to root in water? That's really interesting! I've not tried Porterweed yet. Hmmmm ...

The rooting compound that I use is called Rootone by Green Charm. I've had the bottle for years. One bottle will last a long, long time because it doesn't take much per stem cutting.
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Joined: January 27th, 2007, 6:24 am

July 13th, 2012, 3:27 pm #9

I stuck about 8 cuttings of Black and Blue Salvia in some potting soil. About half have rooted and are now producing leaves.

I gave up on rooting roses in water. It didn't work. So I tried again using soil instead and about half the cuttings have formed roots. I am still waiting to see if Don Juan rooted. The other two climbing species of roses did root as well. I'm so excited!!!

I had also stuck some Pipevine cuttings in water and they root as well. I've potted them up.

And I've got some Brug cuttings rooting in water, too!

Spent the weekend cleaning out my small container ponds. Repotted the waterlilies and divided some of them. Found out I still have mosquito fish alive. I had lost most of them during the winter because the pond surface froze over one cold night. Seems a few did survive and produced lots of babies! LOL! Cleaning those ponds is a messy job! Thank goodness I only have to do it once a year.

So it seems that some plants root fine in water, but most seem to do better in potting mix.

What do you take cuttings of to root? And how do you root them in ... in water or soil?

~Becky~

<span style="width:164px;text-align:center;font-family:sans-serif;font-size:12px;">
Click for weather forecast</span>
Ive always had trouble rooting black and blue from cuttings and not much luck from seed either. But recently thanks to Donald and his method of rooting from tubers Ive had a high rate of success with that method.

But for all rooting in general Ive had my best luck rooting in a soiless mix . Cuphea david verity will root the quickest and will root in nearly anything I find. Sometimes I just use moist perlite to root those.

Steve
Martinsville, In
Heat zone 6
Sunset zone 35





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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

July 13th, 2012, 3:45 pm #10

I stuck about 8 cuttings of Black and Blue Salvia in some potting soil. About half have rooted and are now producing leaves.

I gave up on rooting roses in water. It didn't work. So I tried again using soil instead and about half the cuttings have formed roots. I am still waiting to see if Don Juan rooted. The other two climbing species of roses did root as well. I'm so excited!!!

I had also stuck some Pipevine cuttings in water and they root as well. I've potted them up.

And I've got some Brug cuttings rooting in water, too!

Spent the weekend cleaning out my small container ponds. Repotted the waterlilies and divided some of them. Found out I still have mosquito fish alive. I had lost most of them during the winter because the pond surface froze over one cold night. Seems a few did survive and produced lots of babies! LOL! Cleaning those ponds is a messy job! Thank goodness I only have to do it once a year.

So it seems that some plants root fine in water, but most seem to do better in potting mix.

What do you take cuttings of to root? And how do you root them in ... in water or soil?

~Becky~

<span style="width:164px;text-align:center;font-family:sans-serif;font-size:12px;">
Click for weather forecast</span>
Yesterday I broke the tallest stem that was starting to develop a bud on one of my Penny's Smile Salvias. It was so hot outside that I just ran in and stuck it in a glass of water. Still haven't decided how I will do this one but will probably pot it up in some soiless mix and see how it goes. Within the past two weeks I also rooted a wild Think in Water as well as a Mesa Scarlet. Wild Thing rooted quicker...about 4 or 5 days.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6a
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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