Nectar Notes 2

Nectar Notes 2

Joined: May 19th, 2013, 3:18 am

May 15th, 2015, 5:43 pm #1

Starting a new nectar thread because the previous one had become too long and unwieldy, plus it is nearly 5 years old. There isn't a lot new here, but each reading is another piece of information. I have changed the protocol slightly. Some Salvias produce relatively copious nectar, but other species/cultivars are pretty stingy. Therefore for most that produce 10 to 30 microliters [µL], I sample 2 flowers. For those not familiar with the percentages, they represent the approximate amount of sugar in the nectar. It should be recalled that there might be several different sugars in nectar though generally, hummingbirds will prefer those with more sucrose, that is the most common sugar available in our markets, be it manufactured from sugar cane or sugar beets. The instrument I am using is an inexpensive one that only gives readings to 32.0%. Any nectar sweeter than the ability of the refractometer to measure is denoted as being 32.0+.

Salvia eizi-matudae - 11 flower yielded about 12 µL of 31.0% nectar.

Salvia elegans - 10 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 23.0% nectar.

Salvia oxyphora - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 31.2% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Cosquin' - 2 flowers yielded about 20 µL of 30.0% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia xguaranitica 'Amistad' - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8+% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica var purpurea - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia microphylla - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 28.0% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'Hot Lips' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia adenophora - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 29.2% nectar.

Salvia 'Wendy's Wish' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 30.6+% nectar.

Salvia greggii 'Cherry Queen' - 2 flowers yielded about 15 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Except for the last entry, readings were made yesterday morning [05/14/2015]. The last was done this morning.

Another new plant Agastache 'Arizona Sandstone' - had a tiny drop of nectar, but 20 flowers yielded considerably less than the 8 µL required to give a reading.

Salvia eizi-matudae is a lovely little plant that I just acquired from Flowers by the Sea. The nectar is very sweet but it takes a lot to make a meal. I find both the scientific and common names to be difficult. Neither rolls off the tongue easily.

Several other Salvia species have flowered this spring, but those seemed to be between shows.
Last edited by humband1 on May 17th, 2015, 7:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 21st, 2006, 1:24 pm

May 15th, 2015, 6:53 pm #2

Nancy,

Thanks for this information. I am encouraged to see that 'Cherry Queen' contains such good nectar since we will have three plants in our garden this season (two purchased locally that are already blooming and one by mail order.) I wish we could get Oxyphora to work here in Wisconsin, but I've decided to bypass that one this season (it did not bloom for us at all last season and only bloomed minimally the season before.)
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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

May 15th, 2015, 7:41 pm #3

Starting a new nectar thread because the previous one had become too long and unwieldy, plus it is nearly 5 years old. There isn't a lot new here, but each reading is another piece of information. I have changed the protocol slightly. Some Salvias produce relatively copious nectar, but other species/cultivars are pretty stingy. Therefore for most that produce 10 to 30 microliters [µL], I sample 2 flowers. For those not familiar with the percentages, they represent the approximate amount of sugar in the nectar. It should be recalled that there might be several different sugars in nectar though generally, hummingbirds will prefer those with more sucrose, that is the most common sugar available in our markets, be it manufactured from sugar cane or sugar beets. The instrument I am using is an inexpensive one that only gives readings to 32.0%. Any nectar sweeter than the ability of the refractometer to measure is denoted as being 32.0+.

Salvia eizi-matudae - 11 flower yielded about 12 µL of 31.0% nectar.

Salvia elegans - 10 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 23.0% nectar.

Salvia oxyphora - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 31.2% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Cosquin' - 2 flowers yielded about 20 µL of 30.0% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia xguaranitica 'Amistad' - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8+% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica var purpurea - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia microphylla - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 28.0% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'Hot Lips' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia adenophora - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 29.2% nectar.

Salvia 'Wendy's Wish' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 30.6+% nectar.

Salvia greggii 'Cherry Queen' - 2 flowers yielded about 15 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Except for the last entry, readings were made yesterday morning [05/14/2015]. The last was done this morning.

Another new plant Agastache 'Arizona Sandstone' - had a tiny drop of nectar, but 20 flowers yielded considerably less than the 8 µL required to give a reading.

Salvia eizi-matudae is a lovely little plant that I just acquired from Flowers by the Sea. The nectar is very sweet but it takes a lot to make a meal. I find both the scientific and common names to be difficult. Neither rolls off the tongue easily.

Several other Salvia species have flowered this spring, but those seemed to be between shows.
I was glad to see the high readings for Black and Blue. It will probably be the only producing guaranitica that I have this year since my Amistad cuttings from last fall didn't really flourish over the long grey skies of winter are still very small. I did get one Black and Blue early from Kermit in case my local resource didn't have any but I was able to pick up two more locally today.
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 3:18 am

May 16th, 2015, 2:45 am #4

Starting a new nectar thread because the previous one had become too long and unwieldy, plus it is nearly 5 years old. There isn't a lot new here, but each reading is another piece of information. I have changed the protocol slightly. Some Salvias produce relatively copious nectar, but other species/cultivars are pretty stingy. Therefore for most that produce 10 to 30 microliters [µL], I sample 2 flowers. For those not familiar with the percentages, they represent the approximate amount of sugar in the nectar. It should be recalled that there might be several different sugars in nectar though generally, hummingbirds will prefer those with more sucrose, that is the most common sugar available in our markets, be it manufactured from sugar cane or sugar beets. The instrument I am using is an inexpensive one that only gives readings to 32.0%. Any nectar sweeter than the ability of the refractometer to measure is denoted as being 32.0+.

Salvia eizi-matudae - 11 flower yielded about 12 µL of 31.0% nectar.

Salvia elegans - 10 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 23.0% nectar.

Salvia oxyphora - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 31.2% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Cosquin' - 2 flowers yielded about 20 µL of 30.0% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia xguaranitica 'Amistad' - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8+% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica var purpurea - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia microphylla - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 28.0% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'Hot Lips' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia adenophora - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 29.2% nectar.

Salvia 'Wendy's Wish' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 30.6+% nectar.

Salvia greggii 'Cherry Queen' - 2 flowers yielded about 15 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Except for the last entry, readings were made yesterday morning [05/14/2015]. The last was done this morning.

Another new plant Agastache 'Arizona Sandstone' - had a tiny drop of nectar, but 20 flowers yielded considerably less than the 8 µL required to give a reading.

Salvia eizi-matudae is a lovely little plant that I just acquired from Flowers by the Sea. The nectar is very sweet but it takes a lot to make a meal. I find both the scientific and common names to be difficult. Neither rolls off the tongue easily.

Several other Salvia species have flowered this spring, but those seemed to be between shows.
Kathi and Michael said:
<table align="center" width="60%"><tr><td style="font-size:medium;">Quote:
I am encouraged to see that 'Cherry Queen' contains such good nectar since we will have three plants in our garden this season (two purchased locally that are already blooming and one by mail order.)
</td></tr></table>
Nan: Mine is in a large container in front of the Sinningia sellovii. It has gotten huge, but is in full flower and I can't bring myself to cut it back. Blooming started in early March.
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Joined: May 22nd, 2008, 11:02 am

May 16th, 2015, 3:01 pm #5

Starting a new nectar thread because the previous one had become too long and unwieldy, plus it is nearly 5 years old. There isn't a lot new here, but each reading is another piece of information. I have changed the protocol slightly. Some Salvias produce relatively copious nectar, but other species/cultivars are pretty stingy. Therefore for most that produce 10 to 30 microliters [µL], I sample 2 flowers. For those not familiar with the percentages, they represent the approximate amount of sugar in the nectar. It should be recalled that there might be several different sugars in nectar though generally, hummingbirds will prefer those with more sucrose, that is the most common sugar available in our markets, be it manufactured from sugar cane or sugar beets. The instrument I am using is an inexpensive one that only gives readings to 32.0%. Any nectar sweeter than the ability of the refractometer to measure is denoted as being 32.0+.

Salvia eizi-matudae - 11 flower yielded about 12 µL of 31.0% nectar.

Salvia elegans - 10 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 23.0% nectar.

Salvia oxyphora - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 31.2% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Cosquin' - 2 flowers yielded about 20 µL of 30.0% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia xguaranitica 'Amistad' - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8+% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica var purpurea - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia microphylla - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 28.0% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'Hot Lips' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia adenophora - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 29.2% nectar.

Salvia 'Wendy's Wish' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 30.6+% nectar.

Salvia greggii 'Cherry Queen' - 2 flowers yielded about 15 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Except for the last entry, readings were made yesterday morning [05/14/2015]. The last was done this morning.

Another new plant Agastache 'Arizona Sandstone' - had a tiny drop of nectar, but 20 flowers yielded considerably less than the 8 µL required to give a reading.

Salvia eizi-matudae is a lovely little plant that I just acquired from Flowers by the Sea. The nectar is very sweet but it takes a lot to make a meal. I find both the scientific and common names to be difficult. Neither rolls off the tongue easily.

Several other Salvia species have flowered this spring, but those seemed to be between shows.
Nancy,

I'm sure that you don't have a lot of spare time but any chance you could ever put all these nectar readings in a single document? I've hunted around your past e-mails - making my own list - I'll try to make a spreadsheet of it all some day... (will send you a copy if I ever do it!).

But, in any case, these nectar readings are very interesting! You can easily see why some plants are so favored and others tend to get ignored, if there are better sources around.
Last edited by RonDEZone7a on May 16th, 2015, 3:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Wilmington, Delaware (USDA Zone 7a)
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 3:18 am

May 16th, 2015, 3:50 pm #6

Starting a new nectar thread because the previous one had become too long and unwieldy, plus it is nearly 5 years old. There isn't a lot new here, but each reading is another piece of information. I have changed the protocol slightly. Some Salvias produce relatively copious nectar, but other species/cultivars are pretty stingy. Therefore for most that produce 10 to 30 microliters [µL], I sample 2 flowers. For those not familiar with the percentages, they represent the approximate amount of sugar in the nectar. It should be recalled that there might be several different sugars in nectar though generally, hummingbirds will prefer those with more sucrose, that is the most common sugar available in our markets, be it manufactured from sugar cane or sugar beets. The instrument I am using is an inexpensive one that only gives readings to 32.0%. Any nectar sweeter than the ability of the refractometer to measure is denoted as being 32.0+.

Salvia eizi-matudae - 11 flower yielded about 12 µL of 31.0% nectar.

Salvia elegans - 10 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 23.0% nectar.

Salvia oxyphora - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 31.2% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Cosquin' - 2 flowers yielded about 20 µL of 30.0% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia xguaranitica 'Amistad' - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8+% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica var purpurea - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia microphylla - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 28.0% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'Hot Lips' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia adenophora - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 29.2% nectar.

Salvia 'Wendy's Wish' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 30.6+% nectar.

Salvia greggii 'Cherry Queen' - 2 flowers yielded about 15 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Except for the last entry, readings were made yesterday morning [05/14/2015]. The last was done this morning.

Another new plant Agastache 'Arizona Sandstone' - had a tiny drop of nectar, but 20 flowers yielded considerably less than the 8 µL required to give a reading.

Salvia eizi-matudae is a lovely little plant that I just acquired from Flowers by the Sea. The nectar is very sweet but it takes a lot to make a meal. I find both the scientific and common names to be difficult. Neither rolls off the tongue easily.

Several other Salvia species have flowered this spring, but those seemed to be between shows.
Ron asked:
<table align="center" width="60%"><tr><td style="font-size:medium;">Quote:
I'm sure that you don't have a lot of spare time but any chance you could ever put all these nectar readings in a single document? I've hunted around your past e-mails - making my own list - I'll try to make a spreadsheet of it all some day... (will send you a copy if I ever do it!).
</td></tr></table>
Nan: Ask and you shall receive. SpaceMan did it for us. http://www.network54.com/Forum/439743/m ... 8so+far%29

I copied his compilation and pasted it into a Word document. From there, I can add these new readings. The only new species for the list is Salvia eizi-madudae.
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Joined: September 10th, 2011, 4:19 pm

May 16th, 2015, 3:50 pm #7

Starting a new nectar thread because the previous one had become too long and unwieldy, plus it is nearly 5 years old. There isn't a lot new here, but each reading is another piece of information. I have changed the protocol slightly. Some Salvias produce relatively copious nectar, but other species/cultivars are pretty stingy. Therefore for most that produce 10 to 30 microliters [µL], I sample 2 flowers. For those not familiar with the percentages, they represent the approximate amount of sugar in the nectar. It should be recalled that there might be several different sugars in nectar though generally, hummingbirds will prefer those with more sucrose, that is the most common sugar available in our markets, be it manufactured from sugar cane or sugar beets. The instrument I am using is an inexpensive one that only gives readings to 32.0%. Any nectar sweeter than the ability of the refractometer to measure is denoted as being 32.0+.

Salvia eizi-matudae - 11 flower yielded about 12 µL of 31.0% nectar.

Salvia elegans - 10 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 23.0% nectar.

Salvia oxyphora - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 31.2% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Cosquin' - 2 flowers yielded about 20 µL of 30.0% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia xguaranitica 'Amistad' - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8+% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica var purpurea - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia microphylla - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 28.0% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'Hot Lips' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia adenophora - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 29.2% nectar.

Salvia 'Wendy's Wish' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 30.6+% nectar.

Salvia greggii 'Cherry Queen' - 2 flowers yielded about 15 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Except for the last entry, readings were made yesterday morning [05/14/2015]. The last was done this morning.

Another new plant Agastache 'Arizona Sandstone' - had a tiny drop of nectar, but 20 flowers yielded considerably less than the 8 µL required to give a reading.

Salvia eizi-matudae is a lovely little plant that I just acquired from Flowers by the Sea. The nectar is very sweet but it takes a lot to make a meal. I find both the scientific and common names to be difficult. Neither rolls off the tongue easily.

Several other Salvia species have flowered this spring, but those seemed to be between shows.
Thanks Nancy,
Valuable info as always.
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Joined: May 22nd, 2008, 11:02 am

May 16th, 2015, 3:59 pm #8

Starting a new nectar thread because the previous one had become too long and unwieldy, plus it is nearly 5 years old. There isn't a lot new here, but each reading is another piece of information. I have changed the protocol slightly. Some Salvias produce relatively copious nectar, but other species/cultivars are pretty stingy. Therefore for most that produce 10 to 30 microliters [µL], I sample 2 flowers. For those not familiar with the percentages, they represent the approximate amount of sugar in the nectar. It should be recalled that there might be several different sugars in nectar though generally, hummingbirds will prefer those with more sucrose, that is the most common sugar available in our markets, be it manufactured from sugar cane or sugar beets. The instrument I am using is an inexpensive one that only gives readings to 32.0%. Any nectar sweeter than the ability of the refractometer to measure is denoted as being 32.0+.

Salvia eizi-matudae - 11 flower yielded about 12 µL of 31.0% nectar.

Salvia elegans - 10 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 23.0% nectar.

Salvia oxyphora - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 31.2% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Cosquin' - 2 flowers yielded about 20 µL of 30.0% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia xguaranitica 'Amistad' - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8+% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica var purpurea - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia microphylla - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 28.0% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'Hot Lips' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia adenophora - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 29.2% nectar.

Salvia 'Wendy's Wish' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 30.6+% nectar.

Salvia greggii 'Cherry Queen' - 2 flowers yielded about 15 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Except for the last entry, readings were made yesterday morning [05/14/2015]. The last was done this morning.

Another new plant Agastache 'Arizona Sandstone' - had a tiny drop of nectar, but 20 flowers yielded considerably less than the 8 µL required to give a reading.

Salvia eizi-matudae is a lovely little plant that I just acquired from Flowers by the Sea. The nectar is very sweet but it takes a lot to make a meal. I find both the scientific and common names to be difficult. Neither rolls off the tongue easily.

Several other Salvia species have flowered this spring, but those seemed to be between shows.
Thanks Nancy. Let us know when the new entries are added. Maybe put an "as of" date on the bottom of the list, so you can re-issue it periodically?

And when you get a chance, please test and add to the list:

Cuphea "Vermillionaire"
Salvia greggii "Furmans Red"
Salvia greggii "Ultraviolet"
Wilmington, Delaware (USDA Zone 7a)
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 3:18 am

May 16th, 2015, 4:43 pm #9

Starting a new nectar thread because the previous one had become too long and unwieldy, plus it is nearly 5 years old. There isn't a lot new here, but each reading is another piece of information. I have changed the protocol slightly. Some Salvias produce relatively copious nectar, but other species/cultivars are pretty stingy. Therefore for most that produce 10 to 30 microliters [µL], I sample 2 flowers. For those not familiar with the percentages, they represent the approximate amount of sugar in the nectar. It should be recalled that there might be several different sugars in nectar though generally, hummingbirds will prefer those with more sucrose, that is the most common sugar available in our markets, be it manufactured from sugar cane or sugar beets. The instrument I am using is an inexpensive one that only gives readings to 32.0%. Any nectar sweeter than the ability of the refractometer to measure is denoted as being 32.0+.

Salvia eizi-matudae - 11 flower yielded about 12 µL of 31.0% nectar.

Salvia elegans - 10 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 23.0% nectar.

Salvia oxyphora - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 31.2% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Cosquin' - 2 flowers yielded about 20 µL of 30.0% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia xguaranitica 'Amistad' - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8+% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica var purpurea - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia microphylla - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 28.0% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'Hot Lips' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia adenophora - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 29.2% nectar.

Salvia 'Wendy's Wish' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 30.6+% nectar.

Salvia greggii 'Cherry Queen' - 2 flowers yielded about 15 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Except for the last entry, readings were made yesterday morning [05/14/2015]. The last was done this morning.

Another new plant Agastache 'Arizona Sandstone' - had a tiny drop of nectar, but 20 flowers yielded considerably less than the 8 µL required to give a reading.

Salvia eizi-matudae is a lovely little plant that I just acquired from Flowers by the Sea. The nectar is very sweet but it takes a lot to make a meal. I find both the scientific and common names to be difficult. Neither rolls off the tongue easily.

Several other Salvia species have flowered this spring, but those seemed to be between shows.
Ron added:
<table align="center" width="60%"><tr><td style="font-size:medium;">Quote:
And when you get a chance, please test and add to the list:

Cuphea "Vermillionaire"
Salvia greggii "Furmans Red"
Salvia greggii "Ultraviolet"
</td></tr></table>
Nan: Maybe easier said than done. So far, I have not been able to get my hands on Cuphea 'Vermillionaire'. The only place that knew what it was said they had sold out. They were supposed to call when new stock came in, but . . . no luck. Although they are 75 miles away, I was planning to call and maybe run up to Baton Rouge. However, last evening I was chatting on the phone with a friend in eastern Pennsylvania and she said there was a new Cuphea being sold all over her area - and it was 'Vermillionaire'. Of course, I recited my tale of woe and she promised to send me a couple this coming week. I will test nectar as soon as I have them established. I don't have many Salvia greggii. Actually, 'Cherry Queen' is the only one. I'd like to try 'Ultraviolet' someday.
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Joined: January 1st, 2015, 2:29 am

May 17th, 2015, 1:18 am #10

Starting a new nectar thread because the previous one had become too long and unwieldy, plus it is nearly 5 years old. There isn't a lot new here, but each reading is another piece of information. I have changed the protocol slightly. Some Salvias produce relatively copious nectar, but other species/cultivars are pretty stingy. Therefore for most that produce 10 to 30 microliters [µL], I sample 2 flowers. For those not familiar with the percentages, they represent the approximate amount of sugar in the nectar. It should be recalled that there might be several different sugars in nectar though generally, hummingbirds will prefer those with more sucrose, that is the most common sugar available in our markets, be it manufactured from sugar cane or sugar beets. The instrument I am using is an inexpensive one that only gives readings to 32.0%. Any nectar sweeter than the ability of the refractometer to measure is denoted as being 32.0+.

Salvia eizi-matudae - 11 flower yielded about 12 µL of 31.0% nectar.

Salvia elegans - 10 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 23.0% nectar.

Salvia oxyphora - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 31.2% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Cosquin' - 2 flowers yielded about 20 µL of 30.0% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica 'Black and Blue' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia xguaranitica 'Amistad' - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8+% nectar.

Salvia guaranitica var purpurea - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 26.8% nectar.

Salvia microphylla - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 28.0% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'Hot Lips' - 2 flowers yielded about 30 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia microphylla 'San Carlos Festival' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Salvia adenophora - 2 flowers yielded about 25 µL of 29.2% nectar.

Salvia 'Wendy's Wish' - 2 flowers yielded about 35 µL of 30.6+% nectar.

Salvia greggii 'Cherry Queen' - 2 flowers yielded about 15 µL of 32.0+% nectar.

Except for the last entry, readings were made yesterday morning [05/14/2015]. The last was done this morning.

Another new plant Agastache 'Arizona Sandstone' - had a tiny drop of nectar, but 20 flowers yielded considerably less than the 8 µL required to give a reading.

Salvia eizi-matudae is a lovely little plant that I just acquired from Flowers by the Sea. The nectar is very sweet but it takes a lot to make a meal. I find both the scientific and common names to be difficult. Neither rolls off the tongue easily.

Several other Salvia species have flowered this spring, but those seemed to be between shows.
This is so cool. Thanks for sharing this very useful information to all of us.
-Adrienne
(Staten Island, NY Zone ~7)
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