Mr. Chazman your enthusiasm may have worked

Mr. Chazman your enthusiasm may have worked

Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

April 12th, 2007, 4:06 pm #1

After listening to the great man rantin and ravin
about A.J.,I thought i would check it out.
After all even you can't be right all the time

Went to the range yesterday,and tried A.J.'S
method- at first i hit big hooks-not pull hooks,
so at least I'm coming from the inside.

I can see what you mean about it being a
timing nightmare, so tried to find a key point
in the swing to start the roll.
I came up with the lead heel- as i replanted it
on the down swing that drooped my arms and hands
into the hitting zone, and at that point i
started the roll. Hit hooks that were consistent.
So i weakened my grip slightly- hit draws- a little
weaker- hit mostly straight shots-as A.J. says-
this is not about perfection- but it seems to
me if you can swing your arms and hands through
at the same speed shot after shot and start the
roll when the lead heal is replanted,it would cause
accurate shots most of the time.The hardest part may
be getting the grip right for the type of shot to
be played.

What say you?
I also noticed that i hit the ball better if i
keep a little more weight on my trail side on the
down swing-not so much leg drive.

I'LL have to go to the range some more to see if it
holds up.If it does I'm sure you will be
delighted if your passion has led yet another to
the A.J. way.

JC
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Joined: March 17th, 2007, 8:45 pm

April 12th, 2007, 6:23 pm #2

That is instruction for hopeless hacks trying to cure a slice.

The hands will naturally roll over if the grip is right, and you let them freely swing.

A.J.s stuff is basicly mumbo jumbo, but he sure has made a million or two selling this snake oil.
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Joined: April 10th, 2007, 11:58 pm

April 13th, 2007, 11:38 am #3

a technique in which the hip pivot drives the swing. It takes the club off the plane of the shoulders, moving it to the arms. It becomes a "slapping," a "wave your arms at the ball" with a right forearm plane that is disconnected from its core.

When someone is attempting to "fix a slice" with his intentional forearm roll exertion, he is adding a fault to a fault, and the problem becomes permanent when he comes to believe he cured his slice that way. What he has done is to leave the core reason for the slice in place and added a compensatory and impossible-to-be-consistent effort to overcome the consequence of the original error.

THE GRIP IS SIMPLY TOO WEAK if one needs to consciously rotate the arms. Beginners need sometimes to do it in a DRILL in order to learn that it is OK to roll, but once they have such permission, any necessary roll IS AUTOMATIC AND NATURAL AND NEEDS NO ASSISTANCE.

One of the best ways to screw up your swing is to deliberately roll your arms open into the backswing, placing the shaft below plane. There is no recovery from that, and the shanks and fats and stuff that occurs as a consequence makes the golfer feel like he is a klutz. He is not a klutz: he is doing something that destroys the plane and ease of his swing.

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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

April 13th, 2007, 1:07 pm #4

Mr. Hibbard i have two of your books and they
are excellent- though a bit pricey
Do you think a golfer should aggressively swing
his arms from the top of the swing or should
they just fall with the lower body powering them-
a John Redman type swing?
Have to work on my reading comprehension
should know the answer from your books,
but can you explain anyway?

Mr. Chazman, pehaps you should post Mr Hibbard's
earlier post about A.J. to you on the Bonar forum


thanks, JC

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George Hibbard
George Hibbard

April 13th, 2007, 2:05 pm #5

the PIVOT drives the arms down, not independent arm motion: and the pivot is a gentle leftward slide of the hips that begins the whole thing. You don't "drop the arms" because they are engaged in connecting the pivot to the hands: and they do start with maximum relaxation possible.

think of snapping a bull whip: do you realize that if you move SLOWLY AT THE BEGINNING OF YOUR STROKE THAT YOU CAN SNAP IT FASTER AT THE END?

Lag is happening: and the relaxation provides the ground/basis for the TREMENDOUSLY EXUBERANT EXPLOSION (not a result of force or tension!) that smashes the clubface into the ball way down there later.

"Save it!" But don't deliberately swing slowly at the transition: start down LATER than earlier. When someone says "I swung too fast" I correct him: no you swung too early. But save the "snap" for the instant of truth.

(I considered long and hard about the pricing of my books and DVDs, and concluded that 50 years of experience that gave rise to the ideas and a book that has 100 lessons worth of information is worth more than the cost of one single round of golf at twilight rates on a quality golf course. Many books are priced less out of expectation of what people will pay. I expect more....)



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Joined: March 17th, 2007, 8:45 pm

April 13th, 2007, 5:48 pm #6

Mr. Hibbard i have two of your books and they
are excellent- though a bit pricey
Do you think a golfer should aggressively swing
his arms from the top of the swing or should
they just fall with the lower body powering them-
a John Redman type swing?
Have to work on my reading comprehension
should know the answer from your books,
but can you explain anyway?

Mr. Chazman, pehaps you should post Mr Hibbard's
earlier post about A.J. to you on the Bonar forum


thanks, JC
They all pray at the Snake Oil alter over there.
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Joined: March 17th, 2007, 8:45 pm

April 13th, 2007, 5:53 pm #7

the PIVOT drives the arms down, not independent arm motion: and the pivot is a gentle leftward slide of the hips that begins the whole thing. You don't "drop the arms" because they are engaged in connecting the pivot to the hands: and they do start with maximum relaxation possible.

think of snapping a bull whip: do you realize that if you move SLOWLY AT THE BEGINNING OF YOUR STROKE THAT YOU CAN SNAP IT FASTER AT THE END?

Lag is happening: and the relaxation provides the ground/basis for the TREMENDOUSLY EXUBERANT EXPLOSION (not a result of force or tension!) that smashes the clubface into the ball way down there later.

"Save it!" But don't deliberately swing slowly at the transition: start down LATER than earlier. When someone says "I swung too fast" I correct him: no you swung too early. But save the "snap" for the instant of truth.

(I considered long and hard about the pricing of my books and DVDs, and concluded that 50 years of experience that gave rise to the ideas and a book that has 100 lessons worth of information is worth more than the cost of one single round of golf at twilight rates on a quality golf course. Many books are priced less out of expectation of what people will pay. I expect more....)


There is more golf instruction on your FREE 10 minute video on your website, then there is in the entire 3 DVD set of A.J. Bonars "The Truth About Golf" video.
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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

April 13th, 2007, 6:44 pm #8

the PIVOT drives the arms down, not independent arm motion: and the pivot is a gentle leftward slide of the hips that begins the whole thing. You don't "drop the arms" because they are engaged in connecting the pivot to the hands: and they do start with maximum relaxation possible.

think of snapping a bull whip: do you realize that if you move SLOWLY AT THE BEGINNING OF YOUR STROKE THAT YOU CAN SNAP IT FASTER AT THE END?

Lag is happening: and the relaxation provides the ground/basis for the TREMENDOUSLY EXUBERANT EXPLOSION (not a result of force or tension!) that smashes the clubface into the ball way down there later.

"Save it!" But don't deliberately swing slowly at the transition: start down LATER than earlier. When someone says "I swung too fast" I correct him: no you swung too early. But save the "snap" for the instant of truth.

(I considered long and hard about the pricing of my books and DVDs, and concluded that 50 years of experience that gave rise to the ideas and a book that has 100 lessons worth of information is worth more than the cost of one single round of golf at twilight rates on a quality golf course. Many books are priced less out of expectation of what people will pay. I expect more....)


(I considered long and hard about the pricing of my books and DVDs, and concluded that 50 years of experience that gave rise to the ideas and a book that has 100 lessons worth of information is worth more than the cost of one single round of golf at twilight rates on a quality golf course. Many books are priced less out of expectation of what people will pay. I expect more....)

I apologize for my remark about your books- but i
did use a happy face. With the latest info
you have given me i will read your books again-
maybe it will sink in better this time.

One more thing if i may- you stated that-
think of snapping a bull whip: do you realize that if you move SLOWLY AT THE BEGINNING OF YOUR STROKE THAT YOU CAN SNAP IT FASTER AT THE END?

How do you snap it at the end- do you make any
effort with your arms and hands or does it just happen?
Thanks Mr Hibbard you may have saved me from being
BONARIZED

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Joined: April 10th, 2007, 11:58 pm

April 13th, 2007, 8:07 pm #9

is involuntary in that it occurs not because of applied exertion on the SHAFT, but because of the natural accumulation of lag and the inevitability of the head of the club TO release.

NOT to apply force against the SHAFT, but only into the FULCRUM, increases lag to the point where "it explodes." At that moment the golfer must not "allow" the force in the fulcrum to die: on the contrary: picture this: you have a long stick in your hand and you hit a solid post with it halfway up the stick. The OTHER END flies forward at the instant of collision with considerable force. The stick snaps in two. The end of it BULLETS forward.

It was what happened to Tiger's clubhead when he hit the tree after his 6 iron shot on 16 in the Masters final round - the head probably went faster than it would have been moving if the swing had proceeded normally instead of when the clubshaft hit the tree.

If not in reality, it seems it might have!



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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

April 13th, 2007, 8:50 pm #10

hands driving down into the ball powered by the
trail-right shoulder and arm or a pull down with the
lead-left arm and hand or is it something else?
Sorry about all these questions i should know the
answer too- It seems to sink in better on a
forum like this opposed to reading a book.

THANK YOU Mr.Chazman for bringing Mr. Hubbard on
board- There may be hope for my swing after all

JC
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Joined: October 29th, 2006, 3:58 pm

April 13th, 2007, 9:10 pm #11

In one of your earlier posts- one that i read twice
before and didn't see it! Maybe i have A.D.D.

JC
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Joined: April 10th, 2007, 11:58 pm

April 14th, 2007, 12:25 am #12

hands driving down into the ball powered by the
trail-right shoulder and arm or a pull down with the
lead-left arm and hand or is it something else?
Sorry about all these questions i should know the
answer too- It seems to sink in better on a
forum like this opposed to reading a book.

THANK YOU Mr.Chazman for bringing Mr. Hubbard on
board- There may be hope for my swing after all

JC
JC: the TWO hands bring the club down: the left hand is pulled by the left arm which is pulled by the left shoulder which is moved by the pivot which is moved by the legs.

The RIGHT arm is also driven but it ADDS to the force into the fulcrum by a deliberate and forceful piston-push of the base of my right wristbone onto the top of my left thumb where those two parts are in contact with each other.

That push is of course delayed until the hands are about waist high.

And it is as massive as possible ("I wish I had two right ARMS!")
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