Joined: May 21st, 2013, 12:09 am

April 4th, 2018, 12:37 pm #21

Since it is so easy to upload photos no matter the poor quality here is the vegetable garden a few day ago and in a greener time. We are way behind because of the latish cold weather. I think of Maypop's greens, mine are only now germinating
08102016 helen at the OTV Tomato row.jpg
Neighbor in front of tomatoes
Neighbor in front of tomatoes
veggi garden May 1.jpg
April 1
April 1
Southern New Jersey
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Joined: September 6th, 2009, 11:45 pm

April 4th, 2018, 1:17 pm #22

Okay...











WoW..   ...







Now I know that your plants are on some sort of steroids, and mine are normal!! What are those horses eating??!!?
Central NJ
usda zone 6b
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Joined: May 21st, 2013, 12:09 am

April 4th, 2018, 3:20 pm #23

Here is another perspective on Leonotis. Can't remember who emailed this one.
home garden 2016 tall side.jpg
more tall
more tall
Southern New Jersey
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Joined: May 21st, 2013, 12:09 am

April 6th, 2018, 12:35 pm #24

Ken has been helping me cut back the median garden at Palmyra Cove for a number of years now saving hours of labor with his generator and electric hedge trimmer. This has me wondering when and if the salvia we cut will return after the horrible wet cold winter we've had. Call this set of photos taken in May 2016 the Won't Look Like This photos. Many of the greggii-microphylla will return (at least it is hoped) but they won't be greeting returning hummingbirds with a nice meal.
may2016unknownmicrophylla.jpg
unknown microphylla cultivar
unknown microphylla cultivar
may2016ongviewone.jpg
long view
long view
may2016mostultraviolet.jpg
ultra violet
ultra violet
Southern New Jersey
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Joined: January 1st, 2015, 2:29 am

April 15th, 2018, 5:54 pm #25

Your property looks like heaven, Ward! Hopefully you'll share more pictures of it now. Curious, did the Chilopsis happen to survive?
-Adrienne
(Staten Island, NY Zone ~7)
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Joined: May 21st, 2013, 12:09 am

April 15th, 2018, 10:42 pm #26

Maypop those last photos are of part of the park gardens. And thanks for the kind words.

Once the rain hit there was no more working outside so all the Zinnia were sown in seedling pots and put on a heat mat. Saturday morning all the extra Tropical Milkweed was sown and this morning a flat of small Agastache seedlings went in. The rain should set them in since they are all a mile from water. Verbena peruviana rooted cutting also went in in a xeric bed at the front of the nature center. The park is a tough place, characterized by deer and drought. A gardener has to live with lots of failures.

Oh yes finally the lettuce and mizuna went in - a late spring. Those of us in the north know we only get one shot at this per year. Time starts pressing.
Southern New Jersey
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Joined: May 21st, 2013, 12:09 am

April 16th, 2018, 12:19 pm #27

I forgot to answer your Chilopsis quesion. We tried it a couple of times and it didn't make it. A bunch of other Southwestern plants have at least for a few years. But that is pretty obvious from the photos.

On Saturday there were more Cabbage White Butterflies and angle-winges, presumably Commas were dashing around in the heat. I couldn't get a good enough look at the latter to be sure of the punctuation, they might have been Questionmarks.
Southern New Jersey
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Joined: January 1st, 2015, 2:29 am

April 19th, 2018, 3:40 pm #28

That's too bad about the Chilopsis. I was hoping at least one of the two Conchas Dam Pink we donated would have made it. I'm guessing it's a water issue rather than a cold one.
-Adrienne
(Staten Island, NY Zone ~7)
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Joined: May 21st, 2013, 12:09 am

April 19th, 2018, 7:23 pm #29

Yes, I suspect you are correct. Last year I went in another direction and purchased a Chaste Tree from a local nursery. They are more common in the south but will survive locally. Their lupine-like blue flowers are attractive to insects and hummers will use them. It is hard to know whether it survived but it probably did.

Lettuce other greens and onion bed which will be interplanted with Salvia Embers Wish and white zinnia to replace the greens as the season progresses. Not that you can see any of the plants. I am trying to work out good successions from kitchen garden plants to nectar plants and how to grow some in concert. The hay in this picture was used to cover the young lettuce when it looked like we would have a freeze. In another few weeks the whole garden will be mulched with straw. Not a very exciting photo.
lettuce onion 4 18 18.JPG
April 18th
April 18th
Southern New Jersey
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