Got a new plant - Japanese Honeysuckle

Got a new plant - Japanese Honeysuckle

Joined: September 6th, 2009, 12:00 am

August 28th, 2012, 8:08 pm #1

Needed to replace my Major wheeler that got burned up last summer. Got this at Lowes for half price - 8 bucks. I know it's late in the season but figured if I get a head start maybe it will bloom next spring.








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Heat Zone- Hot
Northeast Missouri
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Joined: October 18th, 2005, 8:20 pm

August 28th, 2012, 8:16 pm #2

It probably won't bloom for you in the fall. It blooms for a month or so late spring thru early to mid summer and may spit out a few more late blooms. Make sure you keep it well trained because it will root along the stem anywhere and is known for its aggressiveness. Sorry to be somewhat negative but you need to know what it can do. It smells great, hummingbirds like it and songbirds are fond of its berries - another way it gets all over the landscape.
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Joined: January 27th, 2007, 6:24 am

August 29th, 2012, 2:00 am #3

Needed to replace my Major wheeler that got burned up last summer. Got this at Lowes for half price - 8 bucks. I know it's late in the season but figured if I get a head start maybe it will bloom next spring.








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It is one aggressive vine I just hope you never want to remove it. My mother had one and when she passed my sister and I decided to remove it and that was one major job , we kept finding roots coming up from it. On the good side it does have a nice aroma that mom always loved.

Steve
Martinsville, In
Heat zone 6
Sunset zone 35





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Joined: September 6th, 2009, 12:00 am

August 29th, 2012, 2:42 am #4

It's gonna stay in a pot so dont see any chance of it getting away from me. I love the smell of honeysuckle.

Maybe I'll take a sprig and plant it over at Dad's when he aint looking. He'd go ballistic.



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Heat Zone- Hot
Northeast Missouri
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Joined: October 9th, 2007, 10:21 pm

August 31st, 2012, 12:47 am #5

does the tag really say japanese honeysuckle??? here in NJ i have fought this plant taking over my side yard, my holly bushes ... everywhere ... i did not want it ... yes it is awesome smelling in early spring ... BUT INVASIVE!!!!! It loves to entangles the same areas in my yard as the virgina creeper and poison ivy ... so do beware ...

i haven't spotted it ever at Lowes .. but then i am in NJ ...

if you want honeysuckle you need to stick to coral honeysuckle (unless you have a spot where you want nothing but this plant and have places for it to climb).. and i have definitely found this (coral honeysuckle).. on occasions .. at Lowes ... It is a native honeysuckles .. .blooms wonderfully in April .. but will continue til frost .. if watered occasionally .. sometimes the aphids will "bug" it .. but a bottle of water with a few drops of ivory soap usually cures it ...

don't get me wrong .. as a child .. i used to love picking the flowers off of japanese honeysuckle and licking it ... and smelling it ... yummmmmm ...

the hummingbirds absolutely adore the coral honeysuckle .... it doesn't quite have the exotic fragrance nor is it quite as intoxicating as japanese honeysuckle .. BUT it absolutely will behave ... AND is much prettier than the japanese honeysuckle ... And much longer lasting !!

Vicki
Edgewater Park, NJ
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Joined: August 31st, 2011, 12:37 pm

August 31st, 2012, 12:51 am #6

Japanese Honysuckle is an absolute plague in Missouri and extremely difficult to control.

Peter
Valle De Cauca
Colombia

https://sites.google.com/site/colombian ... ure-images

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Joined: September 6th, 2009, 12:00 am

August 31st, 2012, 1:18 am #7

Well, I guess I better burn it at the stake!.

I got this because I wanted a vine to replace my Major wheeler. Didnt have any at Lowes but had these for 50 percent off = sold!

As I said It's in a pot so it aint getting away from me. Mom lives in the sticks in Missouri and she said there isnt any around their place, Lake of the Ozarks. Wiki dont lie -



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lonicera_japonica


here is the Tag -

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Heat Zone- Hot
Northeast Missouri
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Joined: August 25th, 2007, 3:30 am

August 31st, 2012, 8:31 am #8

It's possible - just possible - that this particular variety of Japanese Honeysuckle may be less invasive than others. You never know. If you keep it in a pot, it won't get away from you, but it also may not perform particularly well - this is a species that generally likes to send out runners and establish a major root system. A big pot - ie half a large wine barrel - might do the trick.

Growing up in the country, we had this plant growing along a few sections of chain-link fence. It easily took over, bending the fence where needed to accommodate its growth. Just be forewarned.

Kevin Morgan
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

August 31st, 2012, 11:48 am #9

growing up in north Louisiana and east Texas, the only honeysuckle we ever saw was the Japanese honeysuckle. It would grow along all the fence lines and as previously noted the smell in spring was intoxicating. As a kid we always waited for the blooms to open so we could suck out the nectar. My granny had one growing along the back fence of her small backyard garden. In your situation being on the road quite a bit this one might be more forgiving for you but the down side is that it only has a short bloom period compared to the native Coral honeysuckle. I also think you will need a much bigger pot for it though.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6a
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: May 13th, 2007, 1:20 am

August 31st, 2012, 12:36 pm #10

My neighbor has Japanese Honeysuckle that keeps coming into my yard. It's behind her fence where she doesn't see the mess it's made. She gets it creeping into her yard, and I have it pouring into mine. I've paid to have it all removed, and the man who did it swore it would never come back. I knew better but thought it at least wouldn't be as bad. A year later it was bad, and the next year it was coming into my yard again. It's really a struggle to keep it clear of my yard.

Just wanted to stress again to not let it out of your pot.

Carol R
East Tennessee
USDA Hardiness Zone 7a
Heat Zone 7


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Joined: September 6th, 2009, 11:45 pm

August 31st, 2012, 1:50 pm #11

Hi Mike,

Taken right from the link you provided is that it is considered a noxious weed in Texas and it is hard to control due too fruit seeds. Not sure that pot is going to be enough.

I have some growing along the back of my yard. It is pretty wild there to begin with so I don't really care. As others stated, it does not flower as long as the Major Wheeler, you will probably have a bear vine 95% of the time. With the risk and the short flowering season perhaps you should call some local nurseries to see what they might have.

I am surprised that Lowes would be selling this in Texas since it is considered a weed there.

"In the United States Japanese Honeysuckle is classified as a noxious weed in Texas[4], Illinois, and Virginia, and is banned in New Hampshire.[5] It grows extremely rapidly in parts of America such as southwestern Ohio and is virtually impossible to control in naturalized woodland edge zones due to its rapid spread via tiny fruit seeds"

http://www.texasinvasives.org/plant_dat ... ymbol=LOJA some more info from Texas.

Central NJ
USDA Zone 6
:C)
Central NJ
usda zone 6b
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Joined: September 6th, 2009, 12:00 am

August 31st, 2012, 9:04 pm #12

Well ill see what it looks like in a month when i get back. Ive got some big pots i can put it in. We had this on the back fence when i was a kid and dad would not rest till it was gone. Took him years
Northeast Missouri
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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

August 31st, 2012, 10:19 pm #13

and after your dad battled it for years you STILL bought it LOL! Reminiscent of your childhood...I can relate.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6a
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: September 6th, 2009, 12:00 am

September 1st, 2012, 2:39 am #14

A weed is just a plant that is in the wrong place at the wrong time.



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Heat Zone- Hot
Northeast Missouri
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Joined: September 6th, 2012, 5:01 pm

September 10th, 2012, 1:05 am #15

resurrecting an old post, lol... sorry.

Just wanted to add my two cents to the discussion on the invasive potential of this horrible vine. Here in the northwest, this is also considered a noxious weed. Both it an L. periclymenum, the Dutch honeysuckle, are both extremely invasive. They spread by seed into wooded parks from garden plants in the surrounding neighborhoods, and are difficult to erradicate just by pulling. I've seen vines climb 4 feet into the canopy of conifers here, and our trees are not evolved to handle that kind of vine load. Often they end up pulling the trees down as the plants get bigger and heavier.

Worse than that, they hybridize with the native Lonicera hispidula. At this point L. hispidula seems to be holding its own, but this could eventually genetically "swamp" the native vines, since L. japonica is so much more aggressive. I've watched that happening over the years with the native bitter cherry (Prunus emarginata) which hybridizes with all those wonderful ornamental and fruiting cherries everyone thinks are such hot stuff. I think they are weeds...

I cringe when I hear people saying they plant things like this (or holly, cotoneaster, etc) because the birds like it. Yes, they do. But that is part of the problem where invasives are concerned. Fruits are designed by the plants for the birds or something else to pick up the seeds and carry them off to some where else. Basically, when you plant an exotic berry and watch the birds eat it, you are effectively sending that bird off to plant weeds in your neighbors' gardens, or worse the natural areas around you.

Personally I don't think its worth it, but if you do keep it please trim off the berries.


Brett Johnson
Washington 98040
USDA zone 8b

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