Farewell, Blakeites and Mindians

Farewell, Blakeites and Mindians

Joined: September 6th, 2004, 3:46 am

April 23rd, 2011, 7:10 pm #1

I became enamored of Mindy Blake's swing back in 1972 when I was stationed in Edzell, Scotland, took up the frustrating game of golf, and read about Mindy's first book, "The Golf Swing of the Future," in a British golf magazine. I wrote him through the book's publisher and he called me a few weeks later. Actually, when the book was published in other countries, including the U.S., he was beginning to receive calls from all over the world. A lively debate began in the British magazine, "Golf World," about his technique, with argument centered around his claim that the legs could (and should) provide 100% of swing power. He called his swing, the "reflex swing" because he believed all body muscles, other than the legs, acted in reflex to leg action in the downswing, ie, the legs "dragged" the upper body (arms, shoulders, hands and club) down and through impact. He thought it to be the final piece of the golf swing mystery, the solution of which, in his view, had eluded all golf theorists over the centuries. He believed that Ben Hogan and Lee Trevino had come close to, but not fully developed, purely reflex swings. In fact, Hogan had written that the hips (not the legs) did, in fact, provide all the power for the first part of the downswing, ie, from top of swing to about waist level, at which point the shoulders, arms and hands came into play and made their contribution to swing power.

Anyway, I visited Mindy at his home (near Wentworth Club in Virginia Water, Surrey, England) three times during my military tour in Scotland. I was able to develop what seemed to be a pretty good reflex swing and had quite good success with short clubs, ie, from wedges up to seven or six iron. Longer clubs, from six or five iron up to and through the woods, I never swung truly well. Also, I occasionally experienced what I called my "fatal flaw," where my swing would break down completely and I would hit inexplicably weak, powerless shots, even with short irons. Mindy tried to help me during our visits and through a correspondence with we continued through about 1977 after I'd returned to the States. He published his second book, "Golf: The Technique Barrier," in England in 1977 and in the U.S. in 1978. He died suddenly in 1981 but I didn't know that until several years later. I had given up on golf for a few years until I happened opon a paperback copy of GTTB in the 1990s. My enthusiasm was renewed and, from then, my interest waxed and waned for more years until I met Richard Wax through the Single Axis Golf Forum. In September 2004 (can it be that long? OMG!) Bob Staib opened the Mindy Blake Golf Forum and asked me to moderate. We've been discussing and cussing Mindy's ideas ever since. My tank is empty and I feel I have nothing of value left to contribute to the forum. I wonder how many active members we still have? For those who discover Blake's books in the future and are curious to learn more, I do hope that (at least) the archives of this forum remain available to such presently unknown persons.

Along the way, our esteemed member, Tom, who suffers from cancer and other serious maladies, convinced me that Blake's swing could be nothing more than a method of "control," ie, not a sound swing method, but rather a method by which a golfer who already has an elite swing, such as Richard Wax, may control his shots, somewhat in the fashion of pros who use varied techniques to control a tendency common among elite swingers to hook the ball. Of course, Mindy himself sincerely believed that his method was much more than a "control" technique, and others, including Richard Wax, are still fully convinced that Blake had found something unique (and true) that no one else had discovered. In fact, Richard has always maintained that Mindy's downswing is simply a relaxed "turn," initiated by legs, which requires no more effort than one would expend to turn at dinner table to speak with someone sitting next to you. I never understood how such a relaxed action could possibly generate enough power to hit the ball a sufficient distance. Richard, now in his later sixties (as I recall), still says he can play golf all day because of the easy and relaxed effort with which he swings. There are others who wrote of somewhat similar techniques, such as John Redman and Joe Dante, but (like Blake) their ideas were never fully embraced by mainstream golf instruction.

To all I wish happy trails and, naturally, good golfing! Signing off, with warm regards, Jim Hamilton (Snakedoc)
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Joined: September 5th, 2004, 1:22 pm

April 24th, 2011, 3:49 pm #2

This is a sad day,indeed. For those of us in Cyberspace,"You are the man" when it comes to Mindy Blake's golf theories. You made this forum what it is today; you will be greatly missed. My hope is that you will frequent the forum,from time to time, and stay active in a reduced role. I have created a new position for you: Moderator Emeritus. You will still have the ability to moderate,when you visit.

-
Cheers,Bob

KLEX - USA
Regards,
Bob
Lexington, Ky.
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Joined: September 5th, 2004, 1:22 pm

April 25th, 2011, 10:09 am #3

I became enamored of Mindy Blake's swing back in 1972 when I was stationed in Edzell, Scotland, took up the frustrating game of golf, and read about Mindy's first book, "The Golf Swing of the Future," in a British golf magazine. I wrote him through the book's publisher and he called me a few weeks later. Actually, when the book was published in other countries, including the U.S., he was beginning to receive calls from all over the world. A lively debate began in the British magazine, "Golf World," about his technique, with argument centered around his claim that the legs could (and should) provide 100% of swing power. He called his swing, the "reflex swing" because he believed all body muscles, other than the legs, acted in reflex to leg action in the downswing, ie, the legs "dragged" the upper body (arms, shoulders, hands and club) down and through impact. He thought it to be the final piece of the golf swing mystery, the solution of which, in his view, had eluded all golf theorists over the centuries. He believed that Ben Hogan and Lee Trevino had come close to, but not fully developed, purely reflex swings. In fact, Hogan had written that the hips (not the legs) did, in fact, provide all the power for the first part of the downswing, ie, from top of swing to about waist level, at which point the shoulders, arms and hands came into play and made their contribution to swing power.

Anyway, I visited Mindy at his home (near Wentworth Club in Virginia Water, Surrey, England) three times during my military tour in Scotland. I was able to develop what seemed to be a pretty good reflex swing and had quite good success with short clubs, ie, from wedges up to seven or six iron. Longer clubs, from six or five iron up to and through the woods, I never swung truly well. Also, I occasionally experienced what I called my "fatal flaw," where my swing would break down completely and I would hit inexplicably weak, powerless shots, even with short irons. Mindy tried to help me during our visits and through a correspondence with we continued through about 1977 after I'd returned to the States. He published his second book, "Golf: The Technique Barrier," in England in 1977 and in the U.S. in 1978. He died suddenly in 1981 but I didn't know that until several years later. I had given up on golf for a few years until I happened opon a paperback copy of GTTB in the 1990s. My enthusiasm was renewed and, from then, my interest waxed and waned for more years until I met Richard Wax through the Single Axis Golf Forum. In September 2004 (can it be that long? OMG!) Bob Staib opened the Mindy Blake Golf Forum and asked me to moderate. We've been discussing and cussing Mindy's ideas ever since. My tank is empty and I feel I have nothing of value left to contribute to the forum. I wonder how many active members we still have? For those who discover Blake's books in the future and are curious to learn more, I do hope that (at least) the archives of this forum remain available to such presently unknown persons.

Along the way, our esteemed member, Tom, who suffers from cancer and other serious maladies, convinced me that Blake's swing could be nothing more than a method of "control," ie, not a sound swing method, but rather a method by which a golfer who already has an elite swing, such as Richard Wax, may control his shots, somewhat in the fashion of pros who use varied techniques to control a tendency common among elite swingers to hook the ball. Of course, Mindy himself sincerely believed that his method was much more than a "control" technique, and others, including Richard Wax, are still fully convinced that Blake had found something unique (and true) that no one else had discovered. In fact, Richard has always maintained that Mindy's downswing is simply a relaxed "turn," initiated by legs, which requires no more effort than one would expend to turn at dinner table to speak with someone sitting next to you. I never understood how such a relaxed action could possibly generate enough power to hit the ball a sufficient distance. Richard, now in his later sixties (as I recall), still says he can play golf all day because of the easy and relaxed effort with which he swings. There are others who wrote of somewhat similar techniques, such as John Redman and Joe Dante, but (like Blake) their ideas were never fully embraced by mainstream golf instruction.

To all I wish happy trails and, naturally, good golfing! Signing off, with warm regards, Jim Hamilton (Snakedoc)


-
Cheers,Bob

KLEX - USA
Regards,
Bob
Lexington, Ky.
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Joined: April 26th, 2011, 3:03 am

April 26th, 2011, 3:07 am #4

I became enamored of Mindy Blake's swing back in 1972 when I was stationed in Edzell, Scotland, took up the frustrating game of golf, and read about Mindy's first book, "The Golf Swing of the Future," in a British golf magazine. I wrote him through the book's publisher and he called me a few weeks later. Actually, when the book was published in other countries, including the U.S., he was beginning to receive calls from all over the world. A lively debate began in the British magazine, "Golf World," about his technique, with argument centered around his claim that the legs could (and should) provide 100% of swing power. He called his swing, the "reflex swing" because he believed all body muscles, other than the legs, acted in reflex to leg action in the downswing, ie, the legs "dragged" the upper body (arms, shoulders, hands and club) down and through impact. He thought it to be the final piece of the golf swing mystery, the solution of which, in his view, had eluded all golf theorists over the centuries. He believed that Ben Hogan and Lee Trevino had come close to, but not fully developed, purely reflex swings. In fact, Hogan had written that the hips (not the legs) did, in fact, provide all the power for the first part of the downswing, ie, from top of swing to about waist level, at which point the shoulders, arms and hands came into play and made their contribution to swing power.

Anyway, I visited Mindy at his home (near Wentworth Club in Virginia Water, Surrey, England) three times during my military tour in Scotland. I was able to develop what seemed to be a pretty good reflex swing and had quite good success with short clubs, ie, from wedges up to seven or six iron. Longer clubs, from six or five iron up to and through the woods, I never swung truly well. Also, I occasionally experienced what I called my "fatal flaw," where my swing would break down completely and I would hit inexplicably weak, powerless shots, even with short irons. Mindy tried to help me during our visits and through a correspondence with we continued through about 1977 after I'd returned to the States. He published his second book, "Golf: The Technique Barrier," in England in 1977 and in the U.S. in 1978. He died suddenly in 1981 but I didn't know that until several years later. I had given up on golf for a few years until I happened opon a paperback copy of GTTB in the 1990s. My enthusiasm was renewed and, from then, my interest waxed and waned for more years until I met Richard Wax through the Single Axis Golf Forum. In September 2004 (can it be that long? OMG!) Bob Staib opened the Mindy Blake Golf Forum and asked me to moderate. We've been discussing and cussing Mindy's ideas ever since. My tank is empty and I feel I have nothing of value left to contribute to the forum. I wonder how many active members we still have? For those who discover Blake's books in the future and are curious to learn more, I do hope that (at least) the archives of this forum remain available to such presently unknown persons.

Along the way, our esteemed member, Tom, who suffers from cancer and other serious maladies, convinced me that Blake's swing could be nothing more than a method of "control," ie, not a sound swing method, but rather a method by which a golfer who already has an elite swing, such as Richard Wax, may control his shots, somewhat in the fashion of pros who use varied techniques to control a tendency common among elite swingers to hook the ball. Of course, Mindy himself sincerely believed that his method was much more than a "control" technique, and others, including Richard Wax, are still fully convinced that Blake had found something unique (and true) that no one else had discovered. In fact, Richard has always maintained that Mindy's downswing is simply a relaxed "turn," initiated by legs, which requires no more effort than one would expend to turn at dinner table to speak with someone sitting next to you. I never understood how such a relaxed action could possibly generate enough power to hit the ball a sufficient distance. Richard, now in his later sixties (as I recall), still says he can play golf all day because of the easy and relaxed effort with which he swings. There are others who wrote of somewhat similar techniques, such as John Redman and Joe Dante, but (like Blake) their ideas were never fully embraced by mainstream golf instruction.

To all I wish happy trails and, naturally, good golfing! Signing off, with warm regards, Jim Hamilton (Snakedoc)
I'm 24 and only took up golf a year ago. I was messing with my swing at the range after watching a couple videos of Trevino and started experimenting with a very open stance, and, much to my surprise, I started hitting the ball straight (with the shorter clubs, anyway).

After some internet research, I discovered this forum, purchased Mindy's books, and have already found it to be a great resource. So thanks to Snakedoc and all who have made this such a repository of information.
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Joined: October 19th, 2007, 4:27 pm

April 26th, 2011, 2:14 pm #5

I became enamored of Mindy Blake's swing back in 1972 when I was stationed in Edzell, Scotland, took up the frustrating game of golf, and read about Mindy's first book, "The Golf Swing of the Future," in a British golf magazine. I wrote him through the book's publisher and he called me a few weeks later. Actually, when the book was published in other countries, including the U.S., he was beginning to receive calls from all over the world. A lively debate began in the British magazine, "Golf World," about his technique, with argument centered around his claim that the legs could (and should) provide 100% of swing power. He called his swing, the "reflex swing" because he believed all body muscles, other than the legs, acted in reflex to leg action in the downswing, ie, the legs "dragged" the upper body (arms, shoulders, hands and club) down and through impact. He thought it to be the final piece of the golf swing mystery, the solution of which, in his view, had eluded all golf theorists over the centuries. He believed that Ben Hogan and Lee Trevino had come close to, but not fully developed, purely reflex swings. In fact, Hogan had written that the hips (not the legs) did, in fact, provide all the power for the first part of the downswing, ie, from top of swing to about waist level, at which point the shoulders, arms and hands came into play and made their contribution to swing power.

Anyway, I visited Mindy at his home (near Wentworth Club in Virginia Water, Surrey, England) three times during my military tour in Scotland. I was able to develop what seemed to be a pretty good reflex swing and had quite good success with short clubs, ie, from wedges up to seven or six iron. Longer clubs, from six or five iron up to and through the woods, I never swung truly well. Also, I occasionally experienced what I called my "fatal flaw," where my swing would break down completely and I would hit inexplicably weak, powerless shots, even with short irons. Mindy tried to help me during our visits and through a correspondence with we continued through about 1977 after I'd returned to the States. He published his second book, "Golf: The Technique Barrier," in England in 1977 and in the U.S. in 1978. He died suddenly in 1981 but I didn't know that until several years later. I had given up on golf for a few years until I happened opon a paperback copy of GTTB in the 1990s. My enthusiasm was renewed and, from then, my interest waxed and waned for more years until I met Richard Wax through the Single Axis Golf Forum. In September 2004 (can it be that long? OMG!) Bob Staib opened the Mindy Blake Golf Forum and asked me to moderate. We've been discussing and cussing Mindy's ideas ever since. My tank is empty and I feel I have nothing of value left to contribute to the forum. I wonder how many active members we still have? For those who discover Blake's books in the future and are curious to learn more, I do hope that (at least) the archives of this forum remain available to such presently unknown persons.

Along the way, our esteemed member, Tom, who suffers from cancer and other serious maladies, convinced me that Blake's swing could be nothing more than a method of "control," ie, not a sound swing method, but rather a method by which a golfer who already has an elite swing, such as Richard Wax, may control his shots, somewhat in the fashion of pros who use varied techniques to control a tendency common among elite swingers to hook the ball. Of course, Mindy himself sincerely believed that his method was much more than a "control" technique, and others, including Richard Wax, are still fully convinced that Blake had found something unique (and true) that no one else had discovered. In fact, Richard has always maintained that Mindy's downswing is simply a relaxed "turn," initiated by legs, which requires no more effort than one would expend to turn at dinner table to speak with someone sitting next to you. I never understood how such a relaxed action could possibly generate enough power to hit the ball a sufficient distance. Richard, now in his later sixties (as I recall), still says he can play golf all day because of the easy and relaxed effort with which he swings. There are others who wrote of somewhat similar techniques, such as John Redman and Joe Dante, but (like Blake) their ideas were never fully embraced by mainstream golf instruction.

To all I wish happy trails and, naturally, good golfing! Signing off, with warm regards, Jim Hamilton (Snakedoc)
Thanks Jim for your contribution to this forum. You will be missed by all of us. Thank you for the DVD, and to letting me post my differents articles and videos. If I ever stop by Texas, maybe we can meet for a game of golf !!

Best wishes to you Jim,

Claude.
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Joined: May 20th, 2005, 7:53 pm

April 26th, 2011, 4:44 pm #6

I became enamored of Mindy Blake's swing back in 1972 when I was stationed in Edzell, Scotland, took up the frustrating game of golf, and read about Mindy's first book, "The Golf Swing of the Future," in a British golf magazine. I wrote him through the book's publisher and he called me a few weeks later. Actually, when the book was published in other countries, including the U.S., he was beginning to receive calls from all over the world. A lively debate began in the British magazine, "Golf World," about his technique, with argument centered around his claim that the legs could (and should) provide 100% of swing power. He called his swing, the "reflex swing" because he believed all body muscles, other than the legs, acted in reflex to leg action in the downswing, ie, the legs "dragged" the upper body (arms, shoulders, hands and club) down and through impact. He thought it to be the final piece of the golf swing mystery, the solution of which, in his view, had eluded all golf theorists over the centuries. He believed that Ben Hogan and Lee Trevino had come close to, but not fully developed, purely reflex swings. In fact, Hogan had written that the hips (not the legs) did, in fact, provide all the power for the first part of the downswing, ie, from top of swing to about waist level, at which point the shoulders, arms and hands came into play and made their contribution to swing power.

Anyway, I visited Mindy at his home (near Wentworth Club in Virginia Water, Surrey, England) three times during my military tour in Scotland. I was able to develop what seemed to be a pretty good reflex swing and had quite good success with short clubs, ie, from wedges up to seven or six iron. Longer clubs, from six or five iron up to and through the woods, I never swung truly well. Also, I occasionally experienced what I called my "fatal flaw," where my swing would break down completely and I would hit inexplicably weak, powerless shots, even with short irons. Mindy tried to help me during our visits and through a correspondence with we continued through about 1977 after I'd returned to the States. He published his second book, "Golf: The Technique Barrier," in England in 1977 and in the U.S. in 1978. He died suddenly in 1981 but I didn't know that until several years later. I had given up on golf for a few years until I happened opon a paperback copy of GTTB in the 1990s. My enthusiasm was renewed and, from then, my interest waxed and waned for more years until I met Richard Wax through the Single Axis Golf Forum. In September 2004 (can it be that long? OMG!) Bob Staib opened the Mindy Blake Golf Forum and asked me to moderate. We've been discussing and cussing Mindy's ideas ever since. My tank is empty and I feel I have nothing of value left to contribute to the forum. I wonder how many active members we still have? For those who discover Blake's books in the future and are curious to learn more, I do hope that (at least) the archives of this forum remain available to such presently unknown persons.

Along the way, our esteemed member, Tom, who suffers from cancer and other serious maladies, convinced me that Blake's swing could be nothing more than a method of "control," ie, not a sound swing method, but rather a method by which a golfer who already has an elite swing, such as Richard Wax, may control his shots, somewhat in the fashion of pros who use varied techniques to control a tendency common among elite swingers to hook the ball. Of course, Mindy himself sincerely believed that his method was much more than a "control" technique, and others, including Richard Wax, are still fully convinced that Blake had found something unique (and true) that no one else had discovered. In fact, Richard has always maintained that Mindy's downswing is simply a relaxed "turn," initiated by legs, which requires no more effort than one would expend to turn at dinner table to speak with someone sitting next to you. I never understood how such a relaxed action could possibly generate enough power to hit the ball a sufficient distance. Richard, now in his later sixties (as I recall), still says he can play golf all day because of the easy and relaxed effort with which he swings. There are others who wrote of somewhat similar techniques, such as John Redman and Joe Dante, but (like Blake) their ideas were never fully embraced by mainstream golf instruction.

To all I wish happy trails and, naturally, good golfing! Signing off, with warm regards, Jim Hamilton (Snakedoc)
a debt of gratitude. Thanks for your years of commitment & advice and for opening a new world of golf to many of this forum's members. Please chime in when the urge hits you.........keep hitting 'em straight!
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Joined: April 26th, 2011, 3:03 am

April 27th, 2011, 2:23 am #7

I became enamored of Mindy Blake's swing back in 1972 when I was stationed in Edzell, Scotland, took up the frustrating game of golf, and read about Mindy's first book, "The Golf Swing of the Future," in a British golf magazine. I wrote him through the book's publisher and he called me a few weeks later. Actually, when the book was published in other countries, including the U.S., he was beginning to receive calls from all over the world. A lively debate began in the British magazine, "Golf World," about his technique, with argument centered around his claim that the legs could (and should) provide 100% of swing power. He called his swing, the "reflex swing" because he believed all body muscles, other than the legs, acted in reflex to leg action in the downswing, ie, the legs "dragged" the upper body (arms, shoulders, hands and club) down and through impact. He thought it to be the final piece of the golf swing mystery, the solution of which, in his view, had eluded all golf theorists over the centuries. He believed that Ben Hogan and Lee Trevino had come close to, but not fully developed, purely reflex swings. In fact, Hogan had written that the hips (not the legs) did, in fact, provide all the power for the first part of the downswing, ie, from top of swing to about waist level, at which point the shoulders, arms and hands came into play and made their contribution to swing power.

Anyway, I visited Mindy at his home (near Wentworth Club in Virginia Water, Surrey, England) three times during my military tour in Scotland. I was able to develop what seemed to be a pretty good reflex swing and had quite good success with short clubs, ie, from wedges up to seven or six iron. Longer clubs, from six or five iron up to and through the woods, I never swung truly well. Also, I occasionally experienced what I called my "fatal flaw," where my swing would break down completely and I would hit inexplicably weak, powerless shots, even with short irons. Mindy tried to help me during our visits and through a correspondence with we continued through about 1977 after I'd returned to the States. He published his second book, "Golf: The Technique Barrier," in England in 1977 and in the U.S. in 1978. He died suddenly in 1981 but I didn't know that until several years later. I had given up on golf for a few years until I happened opon a paperback copy of GTTB in the 1990s. My enthusiasm was renewed and, from then, my interest waxed and waned for more years until I met Richard Wax through the Single Axis Golf Forum. In September 2004 (can it be that long? OMG!) Bob Staib opened the Mindy Blake Golf Forum and asked me to moderate. We've been discussing and cussing Mindy's ideas ever since. My tank is empty and I feel I have nothing of value left to contribute to the forum. I wonder how many active members we still have? For those who discover Blake's books in the future and are curious to learn more, I do hope that (at least) the archives of this forum remain available to such presently unknown persons.

Along the way, our esteemed member, Tom, who suffers from cancer and other serious maladies, convinced me that Blake's swing could be nothing more than a method of "control," ie, not a sound swing method, but rather a method by which a golfer who already has an elite swing, such as Richard Wax, may control his shots, somewhat in the fashion of pros who use varied techniques to control a tendency common among elite swingers to hook the ball. Of course, Mindy himself sincerely believed that his method was much more than a "control" technique, and others, including Richard Wax, are still fully convinced that Blake had found something unique (and true) that no one else had discovered. In fact, Richard has always maintained that Mindy's downswing is simply a relaxed "turn," initiated by legs, which requires no more effort than one would expend to turn at dinner table to speak with someone sitting next to you. I never understood how such a relaxed action could possibly generate enough power to hit the ball a sufficient distance. Richard, now in his later sixties (as I recall), still says he can play golf all day because of the easy and relaxed effort with which he swings. There are others who wrote of somewhat similar techniques, such as John Redman and Joe Dante, but (like Blake) their ideas were never fully embraced by mainstream golf instruction.

To all I wish happy trails and, naturally, good golfing! Signing off, with warm regards, Jim Hamilton (Snakedoc)
Understanding that you are retired from your moderating duties, is it still possible to get a copy of the DVDs?

I played 9 holes today at a local par 3--the first time I had taken my new swing to the course since discovering this forum and purchasing GtTB. (I've been able to get to the range and practice at home a good bit). I shot a personal best, and on a 110 yard par 3, I actually hit the pin, which is an unfathomable level of accuracy for someone like me whose only been golfing for a few months.

Of course, the ball caromed into a sandtrap and I eventually wound up with a double bogey...but still, that sort of result has me quite excited about the reflex swing. Let me know if the DVD is still available.

Thanks,

Nick
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Richard Wax
Richard Wax

April 27th, 2011, 4:37 pm #8

I became enamored of Mindy Blake's swing back in 1972 when I was stationed in Edzell, Scotland, took up the frustrating game of golf, and read about Mindy's first book, "The Golf Swing of the Future," in a British golf magazine. I wrote him through the book's publisher and he called me a few weeks later. Actually, when the book was published in other countries, including the U.S., he was beginning to receive calls from all over the world. A lively debate began in the British magazine, "Golf World," about his technique, with argument centered around his claim that the legs could (and should) provide 100% of swing power. He called his swing, the "reflex swing" because he believed all body muscles, other than the legs, acted in reflex to leg action in the downswing, ie, the legs "dragged" the upper body (arms, shoulders, hands and club) down and through impact. He thought it to be the final piece of the golf swing mystery, the solution of which, in his view, had eluded all golf theorists over the centuries. He believed that Ben Hogan and Lee Trevino had come close to, but not fully developed, purely reflex swings. In fact, Hogan had written that the hips (not the legs) did, in fact, provide all the power for the first part of the downswing, ie, from top of swing to about waist level, at which point the shoulders, arms and hands came into play and made their contribution to swing power.

Anyway, I visited Mindy at his home (near Wentworth Club in Virginia Water, Surrey, England) three times during my military tour in Scotland. I was able to develop what seemed to be a pretty good reflex swing and had quite good success with short clubs, ie, from wedges up to seven or six iron. Longer clubs, from six or five iron up to and through the woods, I never swung truly well. Also, I occasionally experienced what I called my "fatal flaw," where my swing would break down completely and I would hit inexplicably weak, powerless shots, even with short irons. Mindy tried to help me during our visits and through a correspondence with we continued through about 1977 after I'd returned to the States. He published his second book, "Golf: The Technique Barrier," in England in 1977 and in the U.S. in 1978. He died suddenly in 1981 but I didn't know that until several years later. I had given up on golf for a few years until I happened opon a paperback copy of GTTB in the 1990s. My enthusiasm was renewed and, from then, my interest waxed and waned for more years until I met Richard Wax through the Single Axis Golf Forum. In September 2004 (can it be that long? OMG!) Bob Staib opened the Mindy Blake Golf Forum and asked me to moderate. We've been discussing and cussing Mindy's ideas ever since. My tank is empty and I feel I have nothing of value left to contribute to the forum. I wonder how many active members we still have? For those who discover Blake's books in the future and are curious to learn more, I do hope that (at least) the archives of this forum remain available to such presently unknown persons.

Along the way, our esteemed member, Tom, who suffers from cancer and other serious maladies, convinced me that Blake's swing could be nothing more than a method of "control," ie, not a sound swing method, but rather a method by which a golfer who already has an elite swing, such as Richard Wax, may control his shots, somewhat in the fashion of pros who use varied techniques to control a tendency common among elite swingers to hook the ball. Of course, Mindy himself sincerely believed that his method was much more than a "control" technique, and others, including Richard Wax, are still fully convinced that Blake had found something unique (and true) that no one else had discovered. In fact, Richard has always maintained that Mindy's downswing is simply a relaxed "turn," initiated by legs, which requires no more effort than one would expend to turn at dinner table to speak with someone sitting next to you. I never understood how such a relaxed action could possibly generate enough power to hit the ball a sufficient distance. Richard, now in his later sixties (as I recall), still says he can play golf all day because of the easy and relaxed effort with which he swings. There are others who wrote of somewhat similar techniques, such as John Redman and Joe Dante, but (like Blake) their ideas were never fully embraced by mainstream golf instruction.

To all I wish happy trails and, naturally, good golfing! Signing off, with warm regards, Jim Hamilton (Snakedoc)
"Thanks" is insufficient appreciation for your unique efforts over the years, Jim. I'm sure Mindy would have been overjoyed by the determination which you have shown to promote his methods.

It was a great pleasure to meet up those years ago in Florida. I haven't doubted the Mindy Method once since I made the switch in ...1968/9. My score of 70 gross around the testing course north of Paris at Morfontaine with three birdies and an eagle some four years ago are a testament to the fact that Mindy's method works. I was playing against a golf rater from LA who marked our cards and signed off. He had been told by fellow members of his home club not to play me for money as my short game was somewhat nifty!

I've had a year off golf due to a nasty bike accident in Sicily but am gently returning to the game during a press visit to Morocco in May.

I'm confident that because the method does not call for clubhead speed I'll soon be back playing to my 5 handicap.

My plans are to focus on the hosting of the first St Andrews World Golf Festival which we will organize next April 2012 with many aspects of the game and its traditions as well as its future being the themes of the Festival. I will hope that one aspect of our work will be comparative swings and of course you can count on me to promote the wise teachings of the great Mindy.

As I have said on previous postings, Mindy's golf method is far more than how to hit a golf ball efficiently. His demonstration of the leverage which can be applied is enormously useful in business life, how to generate real "power" from the large muscles and dragging through the "ball" with no stress is an aspect which I have applied to my initiative and in particular my long-term focus on St Andrews.

So, Jim, please stay in touch as I have great respect and friendship for you as you know.

With my warmest personal greetings

Richard
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Joined: August 2nd, 2004, 11:57 pm

April 29th, 2011, 3:51 am #9

I became enamored of Mindy Blake's swing back in 1972 when I was stationed in Edzell, Scotland, took up the frustrating game of golf, and read about Mindy's first book, "The Golf Swing of the Future," in a British golf magazine. I wrote him through the book's publisher and he called me a few weeks later. Actually, when the book was published in other countries, including the U.S., he was beginning to receive calls from all over the world. A lively debate began in the British magazine, "Golf World," about his technique, with argument centered around his claim that the legs could (and should) provide 100% of swing power. He called his swing, the "reflex swing" because he believed all body muscles, other than the legs, acted in reflex to leg action in the downswing, ie, the legs "dragged" the upper body (arms, shoulders, hands and club) down and through impact. He thought it to be the final piece of the golf swing mystery, the solution of which, in his view, had eluded all golf theorists over the centuries. He believed that Ben Hogan and Lee Trevino had come close to, but not fully developed, purely reflex swings. In fact, Hogan had written that the hips (not the legs) did, in fact, provide all the power for the first part of the downswing, ie, from top of swing to about waist level, at which point the shoulders, arms and hands came into play and made their contribution to swing power.

Anyway, I visited Mindy at his home (near Wentworth Club in Virginia Water, Surrey, England) three times during my military tour in Scotland. I was able to develop what seemed to be a pretty good reflex swing and had quite good success with short clubs, ie, from wedges up to seven or six iron. Longer clubs, from six or five iron up to and through the woods, I never swung truly well. Also, I occasionally experienced what I called my "fatal flaw," where my swing would break down completely and I would hit inexplicably weak, powerless shots, even with short irons. Mindy tried to help me during our visits and through a correspondence with we continued through about 1977 after I'd returned to the States. He published his second book, "Golf: The Technique Barrier," in England in 1977 and in the U.S. in 1978. He died suddenly in 1981 but I didn't know that until several years later. I had given up on golf for a few years until I happened opon a paperback copy of GTTB in the 1990s. My enthusiasm was renewed and, from then, my interest waxed and waned for more years until I met Richard Wax through the Single Axis Golf Forum. In September 2004 (can it be that long? OMG!) Bob Staib opened the Mindy Blake Golf Forum and asked me to moderate. We've been discussing and cussing Mindy's ideas ever since. My tank is empty and I feel I have nothing of value left to contribute to the forum. I wonder how many active members we still have? For those who discover Blake's books in the future and are curious to learn more, I do hope that (at least) the archives of this forum remain available to such presently unknown persons.

Along the way, our esteemed member, Tom, who suffers from cancer and other serious maladies, convinced me that Blake's swing could be nothing more than a method of "control," ie, not a sound swing method, but rather a method by which a golfer who already has an elite swing, such as Richard Wax, may control his shots, somewhat in the fashion of pros who use varied techniques to control a tendency common among elite swingers to hook the ball. Of course, Mindy himself sincerely believed that his method was much more than a "control" technique, and others, including Richard Wax, are still fully convinced that Blake had found something unique (and true) that no one else had discovered. In fact, Richard has always maintained that Mindy's downswing is simply a relaxed "turn," initiated by legs, which requires no more effort than one would expend to turn at dinner table to speak with someone sitting next to you. I never understood how such a relaxed action could possibly generate enough power to hit the ball a sufficient distance. Richard, now in his later sixties (as I recall), still says he can play golf all day because of the easy and relaxed effort with which he swings. There are others who wrote of somewhat similar techniques, such as John Redman and Joe Dante, but (like Blake) their ideas were never fully embraced by mainstream golf instruction.

To all I wish happy trails and, naturally, good golfing! Signing off, with warm regards, Jim Hamilton (Snakedoc)
Jim, if there were a Mindy Hall of Fame you would have
to be a charter member. Your efforts here are greatly
appreciated by all of us who have attempted to learn
the Blake method. We were not all successful but there is
something about the Mindy method that keeps nagging at
the back of one's mind calling for another visit and
another try. Watching the graceful swing of Richard Wax
is a powerful inspiration and the footage recently posted
of Mindy echoes that grace and ease. There is something
there most definitely. I hope that your forum will live on
and that it will be visited by someone gifted in a way that
allows them to unlock the mysteries that remain within
Mindy's swing. And there are mysteries there.

Thanks, Jim. Best wishes.
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Joined: September 10th, 2004, 4:03 pm

April 29th, 2011, 12:35 pm #10

I became enamored of Mindy Blake's swing back in 1972 when I was stationed in Edzell, Scotland, took up the frustrating game of golf, and read about Mindy's first book, "The Golf Swing of the Future," in a British golf magazine. I wrote him through the book's publisher and he called me a few weeks later. Actually, when the book was published in other countries, including the U.S., he was beginning to receive calls from all over the world. A lively debate began in the British magazine, "Golf World," about his technique, with argument centered around his claim that the legs could (and should) provide 100% of swing power. He called his swing, the "reflex swing" because he believed all body muscles, other than the legs, acted in reflex to leg action in the downswing, ie, the legs "dragged" the upper body (arms, shoulders, hands and club) down and through impact. He thought it to be the final piece of the golf swing mystery, the solution of which, in his view, had eluded all golf theorists over the centuries. He believed that Ben Hogan and Lee Trevino had come close to, but not fully developed, purely reflex swings. In fact, Hogan had written that the hips (not the legs) did, in fact, provide all the power for the first part of the downswing, ie, from top of swing to about waist level, at which point the shoulders, arms and hands came into play and made their contribution to swing power.

Anyway, I visited Mindy at his home (near Wentworth Club in Virginia Water, Surrey, England) three times during my military tour in Scotland. I was able to develop what seemed to be a pretty good reflex swing and had quite good success with short clubs, ie, from wedges up to seven or six iron. Longer clubs, from six or five iron up to and through the woods, I never swung truly well. Also, I occasionally experienced what I called my "fatal flaw," where my swing would break down completely and I would hit inexplicably weak, powerless shots, even with short irons. Mindy tried to help me during our visits and through a correspondence with we continued through about 1977 after I'd returned to the States. He published his second book, "Golf: The Technique Barrier," in England in 1977 and in the U.S. in 1978. He died suddenly in 1981 but I didn't know that until several years later. I had given up on golf for a few years until I happened opon a paperback copy of GTTB in the 1990s. My enthusiasm was renewed and, from then, my interest waxed and waned for more years until I met Richard Wax through the Single Axis Golf Forum. In September 2004 (can it be that long? OMG!) Bob Staib opened the Mindy Blake Golf Forum and asked me to moderate. We've been discussing and cussing Mindy's ideas ever since. My tank is empty and I feel I have nothing of value left to contribute to the forum. I wonder how many active members we still have? For those who discover Blake's books in the future and are curious to learn more, I do hope that (at least) the archives of this forum remain available to such presently unknown persons.

Along the way, our esteemed member, Tom, who suffers from cancer and other serious maladies, convinced me that Blake's swing could be nothing more than a method of "control," ie, not a sound swing method, but rather a method by which a golfer who already has an elite swing, such as Richard Wax, may control his shots, somewhat in the fashion of pros who use varied techniques to control a tendency common among elite swingers to hook the ball. Of course, Mindy himself sincerely believed that his method was much more than a "control" technique, and others, including Richard Wax, are still fully convinced that Blake had found something unique (and true) that no one else had discovered. In fact, Richard has always maintained that Mindy's downswing is simply a relaxed "turn," initiated by legs, which requires no more effort than one would expend to turn at dinner table to speak with someone sitting next to you. I never understood how such a relaxed action could possibly generate enough power to hit the ball a sufficient distance. Richard, now in his later sixties (as I recall), still says he can play golf all day because of the easy and relaxed effort with which he swings. There are others who wrote of somewhat similar techniques, such as John Redman and Joe Dante, but (like Blake) their ideas were never fully embraced by mainstream golf instruction.

To all I wish happy trails and, naturally, good golfing! Signing off, with warm regards, Jim Hamilton (Snakedoc)
Jim,

May I just add my thanks to those expressed by your other admirers. You have done a magnificent job over the years. Mindy would have been proud of you !!

I am so glad that we were able to meet up in Dallas on that one occasion.

I may have posted a few strange ideas on the MB Forum but I still follow Mindy's approach and feel absolutely certain that some of his theories will form the basis of the golf swing of the future.

Have a happy retirement.

Best wishes, Chris Walker

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Joined: June 23rd, 2005, 6:49 pm

April 29th, 2011, 8:06 pm #11

I became enamored of Mindy Blake's swing back in 1972 when I was stationed in Edzell, Scotland, took up the frustrating game of golf, and read about Mindy's first book, "The Golf Swing of the Future," in a British golf magazine. I wrote him through the book's publisher and he called me a few weeks later. Actually, when the book was published in other countries, including the U.S., he was beginning to receive calls from all over the world. A lively debate began in the British magazine, "Golf World," about his technique, with argument centered around his claim that the legs could (and should) provide 100% of swing power. He called his swing, the "reflex swing" because he believed all body muscles, other than the legs, acted in reflex to leg action in the downswing, ie, the legs "dragged" the upper body (arms, shoulders, hands and club) down and through impact. He thought it to be the final piece of the golf swing mystery, the solution of which, in his view, had eluded all golf theorists over the centuries. He believed that Ben Hogan and Lee Trevino had come close to, but not fully developed, purely reflex swings. In fact, Hogan had written that the hips (not the legs) did, in fact, provide all the power for the first part of the downswing, ie, from top of swing to about waist level, at which point the shoulders, arms and hands came into play and made their contribution to swing power.

Anyway, I visited Mindy at his home (near Wentworth Club in Virginia Water, Surrey, England) three times during my military tour in Scotland. I was able to develop what seemed to be a pretty good reflex swing and had quite good success with short clubs, ie, from wedges up to seven or six iron. Longer clubs, from six or five iron up to and through the woods, I never swung truly well. Also, I occasionally experienced what I called my "fatal flaw," where my swing would break down completely and I would hit inexplicably weak, powerless shots, even with short irons. Mindy tried to help me during our visits and through a correspondence with we continued through about 1977 after I'd returned to the States. He published his second book, "Golf: The Technique Barrier," in England in 1977 and in the U.S. in 1978. He died suddenly in 1981 but I didn't know that until several years later. I had given up on golf for a few years until I happened opon a paperback copy of GTTB in the 1990s. My enthusiasm was renewed and, from then, my interest waxed and waned for more years until I met Richard Wax through the Single Axis Golf Forum. In September 2004 (can it be that long? OMG!) Bob Staib opened the Mindy Blake Golf Forum and asked me to moderate. We've been discussing and cussing Mindy's ideas ever since. My tank is empty and I feel I have nothing of value left to contribute to the forum. I wonder how many active members we still have? For those who discover Blake's books in the future and are curious to learn more, I do hope that (at least) the archives of this forum remain available to such presently unknown persons.

Along the way, our esteemed member, Tom, who suffers from cancer and other serious maladies, convinced me that Blake's swing could be nothing more than a method of "control," ie, not a sound swing method, but rather a method by which a golfer who already has an elite swing, such as Richard Wax, may control his shots, somewhat in the fashion of pros who use varied techniques to control a tendency common among elite swingers to hook the ball. Of course, Mindy himself sincerely believed that his method was much more than a "control" technique, and others, including Richard Wax, are still fully convinced that Blake had found something unique (and true) that no one else had discovered. In fact, Richard has always maintained that Mindy's downswing is simply a relaxed "turn," initiated by legs, which requires no more effort than one would expend to turn at dinner table to speak with someone sitting next to you. I never understood how such a relaxed action could possibly generate enough power to hit the ball a sufficient distance. Richard, now in his later sixties (as I recall), still says he can play golf all day because of the easy and relaxed effort with which he swings. There are others who wrote of somewhat similar techniques, such as John Redman and Joe Dante, but (like Blake) their ideas were never fully embraced by mainstream golf instruction.

To all I wish happy trails and, naturally, good golfing! Signing off, with warm regards, Jim Hamilton (Snakedoc)
Well, everything has to come to its end, and I do realize that the last few years might not have been as interesting as the first ones.

Jim, thank you for sparking my interest into this intruiging piece of human invention called The Reflex Swing, and also for always being so perspicacious and persevering in your interpretation of Mindy's swing.

The irony is that I after having given my wife the promise that 2010 would be my last year of reflex golfing, it turned out that in the last week in late October I stumbled on some revelations. So to today, after, four years in the doldrums, with your good insights, Claude's exercises, Chris's sound advice I'm now playing some fantastic golf!

Jim, thanks for not thinking I was on my own!

Ingvar Bejvel
Stenungsund
Sweden
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