Dug up one Black & Blue and now what?

Dug up one Black & Blue and now what?

Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

November 9th, 2011, 2:28 pm #1

I just dug up and cut off the dead foilage and stems of one of my smaller black and blue plants and shook off the excess dirt. It has new starts already emerging from the crown and lots of tubers. Now what do I do with it as far as storing it for the winter here in Zone 6. This particular plant was very easy to dig up as the soil is nice loose sandy loam.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Last edited by Pennytoo on November 9th, 2011, 2:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: March 16th, 2006, 5:26 pm

November 9th, 2011, 4:10 pm #2

My best luck with Black and Blue is to put it into a pot and essentially "plant" it with soil. I covered it with burlap and put it into a cool dark place in the basement. I watered it occasionally to keep it from drying out.

I have tried to hang it in a burlap bag, but that effort failed. I would appreciate hearing from other people with other options for overwintering.



Steve Kapusta

Zone 4b Sydenham, Ontario
Hummingbird Bander - Ontario Hummingbird Project
www.ontariohummingbirds.ca
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Joined: January 27th, 2007, 6:24 am

November 9th, 2011, 4:52 pm #3

I just dug up and cut off the dead foilage and stems of one of my smaller black and blue plants and shook off the excess dirt. It has new starts already emerging from the crown and lots of tubers. Now what do I do with it as far as storing it for the winter here in Zone 6. This particular plant was very easy to dig up as the soil is nice loose sandy loam.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Penny

Im not sure if you are referring to overwintering just the plant or are you referring to the rhizomes. As far as the plant goes I believe Steve's method is as good as any. From what Ive read you do not want to close up any moisture such as a closed bag which can cause fungus or rot. As far as watering goes I read that one person would just pour a cup of water thru the roots ever so often during the winter

If you are referring to rhizomes/tubers here is a link that may guide you if you are thinking of over wintering those till spring.

http://www.ehow.com/how_5576400_store-c ... inter.html



Steve
Martinsville, In
Heat zone 6
Sunset zone 35





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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

November 9th, 2011, 6:18 pm #4

I just dug up and cut off the dead foilage and stems of one of my smaller black and blue plants and shook off the excess dirt. It has new starts already emerging from the crown and lots of tubers. Now what do I do with it as far as storing it for the winter here in Zone 6. This particular plant was very easy to dig up as the soil is nice loose sandy loam.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Steve no I just want to try overwinbtering the black & Blue tubers. I know I can overwinter the whole plant which is what I have done previously but I would like to try Don's method and see if that will work for me.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Last edited by Pennytoo on November 9th, 2011, 6:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: May 18th, 2010, 1:36 pm

November 9th, 2011, 7:33 pm #5

I just dug up and cut off the dead foilage and stems of one of my smaller black and blue plants and shook off the excess dirt. It has new starts already emerging from the crown and lots of tubers. Now what do I do with it as far as storing it for the winter here in Zone 6. This particular plant was very easy to dig up as the soil is nice loose sandy loam.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
I thought this guy's method was pretty interesting, Penny. You might want to try this:
http://www.greensparrowgardens.com/2009 ... ubers.html

Caro
SE PA, Zone 6b
Last edited by Carobuzz on November 9th, 2011, 7:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

November 9th, 2011, 8:00 pm #6

I just dug up and cut off the dead foilage and stems of one of my smaller black and blue plants and shook off the excess dirt. It has new starts already emerging from the crown and lots of tubers. Now what do I do with it as far as storing it for the winter here in Zone 6. This particular plant was very easy to dig up as the soil is nice loose sandy loam.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Thanks Caro,
I had checked out that link too. I couldn't remember exactly how Don did his. My biggest problem is that I don't have a regular basement to store plants, tubers, rhizomes etc.and my detached garage is not heated. I basically have an area that is only large enough for the furnace, sump pump and a little extra room to move around and it is located under my laundry room. Possibly once my DH gets the floor joists and new floor installed in the laundry room and the appliances back in there and the trap door down into that furnace area I might be able to get him to put my plants down there (if he gets it done before spring that is).

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: May 30th, 2007, 3:21 pm

November 9th, 2011, 11:07 pm #7

I just dug up and cut off the dead foilage and stems of one of my smaller black and blue plants and shook off the excess dirt. It has new starts already emerging from the crown and lots of tubers. Now what do I do with it as far as storing it for the winter here in Zone 6. This particular plant was very easy to dig up as the soil is nice loose sandy loam.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Someone posted a trick a long time ago for storing elephant ear bulbs. They dug them up, and then buried them deeper in the ground in a container, then dug them up again in the spring to plant. I think it's similar to how old-timers stored root vegetables like turnips if they didn't have a cellar. It seems like that might work with B&B tubers if the moisture level was right, maybe packed in barely moist peat. Just something to try if you have enough to experiment with.

I have a big basement but it doesn't stay cool enough in the winter and my garage has windows on the east and west so it gets too warm on sunny days and gets below freezing sometimes. I would love to have an old fashioned root cellar and would dig one myself if it wasn't so horribly rocky here ... and if I was 20 years younger. lol
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Joined: January 27th, 2007, 6:24 am

November 9th, 2011, 11:19 pm #8

I just dug up and cut off the dead foilage and stems of one of my smaller black and blue plants and shook off the excess dirt. It has new starts already emerging from the crown and lots of tubers. Now what do I do with it as far as storing it for the winter here in Zone 6. This particular plant was very easy to dig up as the soil is nice loose sandy loam.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Birdnerd

I know what you are saying about rocky. Its been a rough road[pun] trying to dig up or try to plant something in this yard. Even a simple tree is a major effort with all the rock here.

Penny-- I only know what Don said about planting the tubers in potting soil, cutting the tubers in 2 inch sections with 2nodes if possible, using peat pots in a flat. I dont remember what was said about storing the tubers till spring.

Steve
Martinsville, In
Heat zone 6
Sunset zone 35





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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

November 9th, 2011, 11:22 pm #9

I just dug up and cut off the dead foilage and stems of one of my smaller black and blue plants and shook off the excess dirt. It has new starts already emerging from the crown and lots of tubers. Now what do I do with it as far as storing it for the winter here in Zone 6. This particular plant was very easy to dig up as the soil is nice loose sandy loam.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Christie
From the construction, I have a feeling that the area under my laudry room was originally a root cellar as our house was built in the 1800's and it originally sat on 50 acres of farmland which was sold off in small parcels over the years. At some point I think back in the 50's the fireplaces were remove and a furnace added and that seemed to be the most logical place to put it. I don't know if it would stay cool enough down there or not as I have only been down there once in the 13 yrs. we have lived here but it is worth a try.

Our soil holds too much moisture in the winter from all the snow to put pots in the ground that need really good drainage. I have overwintered cannas in a closet under the stairs as that closet stays cool so that is a possiblility.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: May 30th, 2007, 3:21 pm

November 10th, 2011, 9:08 pm #10

I just dug up and cut off the dead foilage and stems of one of my smaller black and blue plants and shook off the excess dirt. It has new starts already emerging from the crown and lots of tubers. Now what do I do with it as far as storing it for the winter here in Zone 6. This particular plant was very easy to dig up as the soil is nice loose sandy loam.

Penny
NY
USDA hardiness zone 6
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
Doesn't the furnace itself keep the cellar too warm?
We don't get as much snow as you but I think the ground still stays too moist here in the winter. I have a lot of trouble with any plants that need to stay dryish in the winter like agastache.
Maybe you could bury tubers in a waterproof container.
I wonder if anyone has tried keeping them in a refrigerator. Too cold?

I've been trying to decide whether to leave my Black and Blues alone or dig them up. I left them last year and most of them made it. I put a couple pots in my garage for insurance and those didn't. I might have let them get too dry.


Christie
Missouri
zone 6
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