Cuttings Question

Joined: October 5th, 2014, 6:34 pm

September 9th, 2016, 1:59 pm #1

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
Cathy P
Downers Grove, IL
Zone 5
Bazuhi@sbcglobal.net
Visit Me At:
https://www.facebook.com/Cathy-Ps-Hummingbird-Gardens-885457968170727/
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Joined: May 21st, 2013, 12:09 am

September 9th, 2016, 11:23 pm #2

That would probably work although might want to let the roots grow more.

Why cell packs? I prefer 4 inch or 6 inch pots depending on the size of the cuttings.
Southern New Jersey
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Joined: May 18th, 2013, 9:33 pm

September 10th, 2016, 5:23 pm #3

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
I dont use cell packs myself, but if you are afraid of damaging roots you might take a pair of small scissors and cut away the pack, that is when you feel you feel you have enough roots.
Steve W.
Martinsville IN.
Zone 6
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Joined: September 10th, 2011, 4:19 pm

September 10th, 2016, 11:53 pm #4

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
Planted some Cardinal Flower the other day, with long roots out the bottom of the cells. I just tore the packs, that worked.
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Joined: August 6th, 2016, 5:49 pm

September 11th, 2016, 1:53 am #5

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
Cathy I love your questions, we seem to have similar or the same questions. I started cuttings a few weeks ago (just three of them to see if I could get it to work, it was a success so now I have more going now for about a week, I didn't know when to exactly move the, to,soil either. I gave them a tug test slightly tugged them upward and they held. Which I was excited about, however I had the same problem as you how to get them out. I grew them in a six inch plastic pot full of vermiculite with a 2 in clay pot in the center, with the bottom of the 2 inch pot plugged (I used my wife's hot glue gun). Before I put the cuttings in the vermiculite I soaked it with water in the pot.

Anyway back to the cuttings so I knew they rooted (waited a little over two weeks before I gave the tug test) but had no idea how well they were rooted and how to get them out. So I just used my finger and kind of swept up from below and to the side of the cuttings two were well rooted and the third had roots, so I moved them to potting soil and 4 inch pots. 2 of them are doing good the third lost all of its leaves(4 of them) but it's growing more now.

I will have to take photos and post them here at a later date. Been a very busy last month haven't had much time to get here and post/comment much on the forums.
Central Utah
Zone 6b
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Joined: October 5th, 2014, 6:34 pm

September 15th, 2016, 2:31 pm #6

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
Ward
I am gonna let them go a little more till I see a better
root coming out of the bottom. I just checked yesterday
and some plants have a decent root. I decided cell packs
only cause my cuttings were kinda small and I didn't want
to go thru all the work only to have it fail and my cell
packs are a little easier to manage. I will move them into
larger pots of course and hopefully they will survive the
transplant.

.
Thanks Steve
Will the roots fill the perlite like it would soil?
Form a root ball I guess is what I want to say around the
perlite?
.
David
Thanks.. I have a ton of those other cardinal flowers
and will have seeds soon you want any?
.
Dylan
That's why this site is so great, told ya you'd learn a lot.
I'm afraid to do the tug test my luck is I'll break the roots
with my amazing strength...baahaaa.
I really do not want to ruin my cell packs either I am so cheap
I may try to remove the ones that are doing really good today
and get them into soil.
.
I am going to use seed starter soil with organic stuff in it
to see how they do. I sure hope I can get these to stay alive
over the winter I always forget the watering and keeping them moist
.
WISH ME LUCK!
Cathy P
Downers Grove, IL
Zone 5
Bazuhi@sbcglobal.net
Visit Me At:
https://www.facebook.com/Cathy-Ps-Hummingbird-Gardens-885457968170727/
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Joined: September 6th, 2012, 5:01 pm

September 16th, 2016, 5:38 am #7

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
Personally I prefer to do cuttings straight into soil rather than into pearlite (or vermiculite for that matter). The only reason I would initially do pearlite is if I wanted to do a number of cuttings crowded into a flat or something like that, and then transplant the ones that make it into larger pots (as if I had a misting system to make something like this worthwhile, let alone space in a greenhouse to make room for growing out all the cuttings, lol...) For the small amount of cuttings I do, a regular potting soil with a little extra "grit" (pearlite or course sand, whichever I happen to have on hand) seems to work well enough for me.


But to answer your question, especially if they are individually in cell packs, I would wait till the root system more or less fills the pot, then tip them upside down and push them out as if it were soil. Any loose pearlite will fall off at this point, mix that into your potting soil and pot them up as normal. If there is a big glump of pearlite I might try and knock a bunch of it off the roots, but other than that I would treat it the same as if it were soil. Often you will find the rootlets growing straight into the middle of the grains of pearlite, so much of them will stay put no matter what you do. This isn't a bad thing at all, just the way the roots are growing.

If you have multiple cuttings you want to tease apart in the cells, then a less robust root system will make that easier. I really don't recommend this though, since you are essentially forcing an extra step that in small scale production you don't really need. Just strike the cuttings into soil in the first place, and skip the initial transplant.


FWIW, the roots on these cuttings are much sturdier than you might think, assuming you have a good rootball to begin with. Even breaking a couple off is not likely to kill the plant, though it may slow the growth of the top down somewhat. Not a big deal if the cutting is still healthy. Either way, potting them up is stressful to the plant, so give it a plastic bag over its head for a day or two, or put it over a tray of water for the extra humidity at least, till it's leaves perk up again, which may take a day or two, and keep it out of direct sun. Fluorescent lights don't seem to be much of a problem, but even in a window direct sun can be too much for a transplant. Once the leaves are standing tall again, so to speak, the roots are active again, and you should be good to go.
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Joined: October 5th, 2014, 6:34 pm

September 16th, 2016, 12:32 pm #8

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
Brett
Thanks for the info.. I had my cuttings in my cheap little
greenhouse siting in water where it stayed warmer then outside
but not blazing.
I always forget to keep them moist so that's why I wanted to get them
going and decided to try perlite so I can just keep them in water while
I did other things and they sit in a greenhouse.
.
I did check out the roots and decided my hotlips salvia cuttings
and my cuphea x purpurea firecracker seemed to have a pretty good
root so I went ahead and decided to pot them up yesterday.
I ended up turning them upside down and tapping them so was able
to get them out of the cell packs.
.
Yep I probable made the mistake I went up in the size of cell pack
and not into a larger pot, I thought a smaller pot allowing the
roots to fill would be easier to maintain proper watering? I'm a
failure with the watering as I keep stating once they get going.
I actually put them into an organic seed starting soil and they are
still in the greenhouse sitting in water to absorb.
I think the greenhouse should keep them moist vs dry if outside but should
I leave them sitting in the water in the soil or take them ot of the water
and keep moist?
.
I will have to go out today and check to see if they wilted or how they are
doing out there after their transplant
.
Cuttings question
Cathy P
Downers Grove, IL
Zone 5
Bazuhi@sbcglobal.net
Visit Me At:
https://www.facebook.com/Cathy-Ps-Hummingbird-Gardens-885457968170727/
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Joined: September 6th, 2012, 5:01 pm

September 16th, 2016, 6:03 pm #9

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
With the exception of true wetland plants like Lobelia cardinalis, most plants don't like sitting in water either. There is a balance here- you want to keep them moist but not wet. Wet soil, where if you squeeze it in the palm of your hand water runs out, is too much for most plants to handle. There are a number of reasons for this, just realize that most plants don't want to sit long term in water. It should only take an hour or two for the soil to fully hydrate in such a small pot, any more than that is just excess. So if the pots are sitting in water longer than that, pick em up and empty the tray of water, too much water can be as bad as too little.


If you really want to make this easier, look into the various "self watering" systems. They can be diy self made things for pennies if not free, or there are several rather nice seed and cutting starting systems on the market with capillary mats where you fill a reservoir and the mat wicks the water up to the soil. I have an old one from Gardener's Supply Online that I've been using for almost 15 years now. It's getting beat up (I'll never know why they decided to make the silly things from styrofoam of all things), but still works great (if I can find the capilary mat, which seems to have gone missing...)

I made some from simple plastic bottles that essentially work the same. I used various sizes of plastic water and juice bottles, even tried a milk jug. They all worked. Basically, take a clean empty bottle, WITH LID. Cut the bottle in half mid way up so you have a solid bottom base, and the neck with lid separated. Take off the lid for a bit, and poke or drill a hole in the center of the lid, I used a small nail to do this, but an awl or a small drill bit will work. Next cut a piece of COTTON string a couple of inches long. For a small pot 2-3 inches is fine, for a larger pot a little bigger one may work better. I tie a knot in the string an inch from one end, then poke the string through the hole in the lid. I do it so that the knot and the short end is in the inside of the cap, and the long end hanging free to the outside. This cotton wick is how the moisture gets in to the soil.

Screw the lid back on the neck of the bottle, making sure at least an inch of string is inside with a nice tail hanging down. Fill the neck with soil covering the string inside. Make SURE the soil reaches all the way to the bottom of the neck, this won't work if there is an air bubble and the string doesn't come into contact with the soil. Chopsticks are great tools to knock soil into the base without overly compacting things. Fill the base with a couple of inches of water, ideally so that the water isn't too far up beyond the bottle cap once it's inverted inside the base. In fact, if the water doesn't touch the cap, the string will still pull the water up into the soil. That's how this system works so well.

I use simple potting soil for this, but you do need to be careful to make sure that the soil you use has enough organic matter (peat moss, shredded bark, etc) to pull the water from the cotton string. Pearlite on it's own doesn't work this way, it doesn't actively absorb enough for the wicking action needed to keep the soil moist. It does however help keep soil pore spaces open enough for oxygen to get to the roots, which is vitally important for good root development (and one of the main reasons you don't want to over-saturate the soil with water long term, which fills these spaces with water). A good soil mix generally has both in it.

Once you have the top with the neck filled with soil,go ahead and strike a cutting into it, then water as normal. Fill the base with an inch or two of water, and place the neck down into the reservoir, making sure the string dangles freely into the water. Check the base and top off with more water if it gets low, and these will keep your cuttings nice and moist without usually getting too soggy. Usually if it's getting too wet, it's because the water level in the base is up higher than where the cap sits,and the soil isn't able to drain properly.

The down side I found with these bottle pots is that 1) they tip over way too easily, 2) the water reservoir can be a pain to keep filled, and the more you have the more of a hassle it seems to be, and 3) the plants aren't always easy to get out of them, especially the smaller sized ones. But they are virtually free from stuff you likely already have around the house, and you can make them from a variety of sized bottles for different needs. I find the commercially available one I mentioned above much easier to use, and am seriously considering getting a couple of new ones.

Of course, these pots work for all kinds of plants, not just cuttings. I originally picked up the way of doing these from a website that recommended them for growing out African violets. Commercial growers sometimes use big tables fitted with a capillary mat, with regular nursery pots with a string out the bottom, sitting on the mats. Drip irrigation keeps the mat moist. For plants you don't want water anywhere near the leaves, this is a great system to use.


Hmm, if the above explanation is clear as mud, go to youtube or something and search for "water bottle self wicking pot" and you will find lots of variations on the theme.
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Joined: October 5th, 2014, 6:34 pm

September 22nd, 2016, 12:44 pm #10

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
Brett
Thanks, the cuttings I did add to soil I did removed them
from sitting in the water and will have to keep a point
in making sure they don't dry out for to long.
If I can not I'll have to look into that wicking
idea.
.
today I plan on checking on the rest of my cuttings
and getting them potted up as well and then it is a matter
of if they live all winter for me. The biggest plants I really
want to survive are the cupheas! The others I can buy at the nursery
for a good price
Cathy P
Downers Grove, IL
Zone 5
Bazuhi@sbcglobal.net
Visit Me At:
https://www.facebook.com/Cathy-Ps-Hummingbird-Gardens-885457968170727/
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Joined: May 21st, 2013, 12:09 am

September 22nd, 2016, 2:19 pm #11

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
If you don't have one and plan to be doing a lot of rooting and seed starting in the future you should do yourself a favor and pick up a heat mat. It will vastly improve both reliability and predictability of your rooting and germinating efforts.
Southern New Jersey
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Joined: May 18th, 2013, 9:33 pm

September 29th, 2016, 3:51 pm #12

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
Yes a heat mat can be a big help especially if you are doing a lot of cuttings/seedling. I have had mine for many years and use when Im doing a flat like in march. I was surprised recently seeing a heat mat for sale in walmart not having seen one there before.

Cathy-- My feelings on using either perlite or course vermiculite is that it allows more air to circulate and easier movements for roots. Using either of those you may want to re-moisten if needed especially when doing single containers. Not so much when doing a flat. Also as Ward related to it would be best to let them root for a while to get a decent root mass before moving them to a soil mix. Lots of people like to root them in water, but I tend to steer away from that as the roots will then have to adjust from water to soil and sometimes there are problems.

I have just recently took a few cuttings of david verity, amistad, and oxyphora since we've been having these colder temps recent. I just have those cuttings sitting in a north window. I already had cuphea schumannii cuttings going for a while. The wendys wish I got from ebay is doing nicely and later intend to take cuttings from it.
Steve W.
Martinsville IN.
Zone 6
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Joined: October 5th, 2014, 6:34 pm

October 24th, 2016, 1:48 am #13

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
Thanks guys and yes I currently own several heat mats..
They did get some nice roots and those have been planted into
pots, The Ensign is the only one I left since the roots were small
.
I have lost a few after the transplant but now I noticed I saw a few white fly in
my crawl space. Everything has been treated prior to going down there so if
I get white fly it a be a case of shutting off all the lights and letting it go,
I may just say forget it. I don't want to deal with the insects problem I had last
year. That will include all the plants I have down there... sadly to many to replace
next year as well..I have 15 dragon wing begonias just to give you an idea.
Sorry I am frustrated..
Cathy P
Downers Grove, IL
Zone 5
Bazuhi@sbcglobal.net
Visit Me At:
https://www.facebook.com/Cathy-Ps-Hummingbird-Gardens-885457968170727/
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Joined: January 10th, 2016, 12:32 am

October 25th, 2016, 12:35 am #14

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
Hi Cathy
So if you have the dragon wings still in the pot and don't want to just give up on them, leave them in the pot until the tops die off then dig up the tubers they formed this summer. You will be amazed by how big they are. The tubers need to be trated like a canna lilly, so let them dry, and remove the dead tops, wrap in newspaper and place in a dark cool place..Check to see if they are drying out over the winter and mist if necessary...
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Joined: October 5th, 2014, 6:34 pm

October 30th, 2016, 1:22 am #15

Okay I know there are old post out there
but do not feel like looking for them and I
know I never saw this question asked.
Sooooo dork here in dorkville has cuttings
I started in cell packs in perlite and have them
sitting in water. I did find that some have
actually taken because I see tiny roots coming out
of the bottom of the cell pack on some.
.
When do I move them to soil, the roots I see are
very fine so far.
.
My big question how do I get them out of the
cell pack without tearing any roots? Could I
dunk the cell pack into water and will it float
out of the cell pack?
Llena
Oh I cut my dragon wings down and bring them in and they grow all winter
in the same pots till spring where just before they go outside they get another trim.
I do the same with my geraniums..
The are such easy plants
Cathy P
Downers Grove, IL
Zone 5
Bazuhi@sbcglobal.net
Visit Me At:
https://www.facebook.com/Cathy-Ps-Hummingbird-Gardens-885457968170727/
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