Compelled to post

Compelled to post

Joined: March 28th, 2006, 5:40 pm

March 28th, 2006, 6:06 pm #1


Hey Guys,

In the late 7o's I begun an obsessive journey to learn and execute a better method to swing a golf club. It wasn't long into my journey where I came across "The Golf Swing of the Future" I practiced incessantly until I became good at it. Not to many years later I bought Mindy's other book GtTB, became convinced even more he was on the right track. Long story from there but I've been through most and more of what is discussed on this forum. I stopped about 5 years to do some things but have been re-energized since finding people like me existed. Have to go now but will be in touch. This really exicites me.

Speck
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Joined: September 5th, 2004, 1:22 pm

March 28th, 2006, 6:25 pm #2

I'm going out on a limb and guessing you wouldn't agree with this article I just found about Blake's swing

http://www.golfimprovementtechniques.co ... blake.html
Regards,
Bob
Lexington, Ky.
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Joined: March 28th, 2006, 5:40 pm

March 28th, 2006, 7:05 pm #3



I've always been open to new ways of thinking, thats how I got onto my road to begin with. From what I read so far in what you sent me, the opinion seems very negative and inadequately examined. You are right, I definitely disagree with what was expressed. Over the years I experimented with various techniques and decided MB was on the right track. I also liked a lot of what Joe Norwood [Golf-O-Metrics] had to say. I used to run into some nay-sayers,would take them to the range, talk to them, demonstrate some things,and more often than not would convince them I was on to something worthwhile.
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Joined: September 6th, 2004, 3:46 am

March 28th, 2006, 8:20 pm #4


Hey Guys,

In the late 7o's I begun an obsessive journey to learn and execute a better method to swing a golf club. It wasn't long into my journey where I came across "The Golf Swing of the Future" I practiced incessantly until I became good at it. Not to many years later I bought Mindy's other book GtTB, became convinced even more he was on the right track. Long story from there but I've been through most and more of what is discussed on this forum. I stopped about 5 years to do some things but have been re-energized since finding people like me existed. Have to go now but will be in touch. This really exicites me.

Speck
Welcome to the Blake forum. We're very interested to hear of your experience with Blake. I gather you developed your reflex swing using the instruction in GSotF. When you found the second book, GtTB, did you modify your swing to incorporate the open stance, and other changes Mindy recommended? Looking forward to hearing from you. SD/Jim
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Joined: September 6th, 2004, 3:46 am

March 28th, 2006, 8:43 pm #5

I'm going out on a limb and guessing you wouldn't agree with this article I just found about Blake's swing

http://www.golfimprovementtechniques.co ... blake.html
This analysis is devastating! I sure hope I can sell my copies of GtTB before this gets spread around.

"The very open stance and strong grip make the swing awkward to perform." Hmmm. I wonder how long they tried. Fifteen minutes? Two days? A week? Well, of course, it should all have come together by then. Several forum members have reported that the open stance facilitates swing execution.

"We believe this to be a dangerous swing and one that is close to impossible to execute as per the explanations. Maximum X-Factoring and driving the legs enhances the chances of injury..." Now that one scares the daylights out of me. But wait. Those who have been at it longest, Richard, Chris and Julian, have reported no injuries of any kind as a result of swinging the Mindy way.

"...the explanation of power application does not agree with any data that we have taken or seen." Blake believed he had found a method of power application that no one else in golf had yet discovered. He believed the principle involved to be in common use in field athletics.

We are so lucky to have located this treasure. No more time wasted. Thank heavens. SD
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Joined: September 6th, 2004, 3:46 am

March 28th, 2006, 8:53 pm #6



I've always been open to new ways of thinking, thats how I got onto my road to begin with. From what I read so far in what you sent me, the opinion seems very negative and inadequately examined. You are right, I definitely disagree with what was expressed. Over the years I experimented with various techniques and decided MB was on the right track. I also liked a lot of what Joe Norwood [Golf-O-Metrics] had to say. I used to run into some nay-sayers,would take them to the range, talk to them, demonstrate some things,and more often than not would convince them I was on to something worthwhile.
Speck, John Redman wrote a book entitled "Essentials of the Golf Swing". His method has some similarities to Blake's, particularly with respect to power being generated by the lower body and being applied through a 'passive' upper body. However, he conceived of power generation by hip turn rather than by the legs. SD
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Joined: March 28th, 2006, 5:40 pm

March 29th, 2006, 3:18 pm #7

Welcome to the Blake forum. We're very interested to hear of your experience with Blake. I gather you developed your reflex swing using the instruction in GSotF. When you found the second book, GtTB, did you modify your swing to incorporate the open stance, and other changes Mindy recommended? Looking forward to hearing from you. SD/Jim
Actually I have spent significantly more time using techniques as described in GtTB. Before I discovered the second book I had already been experimenting with the open stance.[at the time I opened up but still lined the clubhead 1-2 inches inside the line] To answer the critics, I have discovered the aspects of MB's method are actually less inclined to cause injury. The method is also easier to consistently execute vs. the twisting turning wind up method. Its more of a stretch,[hips,shoulders] going back, stretch when legs drive which reflexively produce the dragging through the ball. I would suspect the experimenters for the 100 word article used a conventional shoulder turn to come up with the contorted conclusion. Understanding and feeling the shoulder turn is hard to learn when your muscle memory wants it the coventional way.
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Joined: September 6th, 2004, 3:46 am

March 30th, 2006, 2:29 am #8

Speck,
1. How difficult was becoming skilled at the basic 'dragging' or reflex action?
2. Was there any particular aspect or element of the swing that presented special difficulty for you?
3. Do you use Blake's grip change and, if so, do you find it to be an easy, natural action?
4. Do you find well bent over posture necessary to properly 'connect' the lower and upper body?
5. In a full swing, what is the level of effort you perceive in your downswing? Would you describe it as (a) a rapid thrusting of the legs toward the target; (b) a firm, slow drive of the legs/knees toward the target; (c) a 'turn' of the legs/hips back to their address position, or (d) something else?
6. Could you give us an idea of your average distances?

Thanks, Jim
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Joined: March 28th, 2006, 5:40 pm

March 30th, 2006, 1:21 pm #9



Hello Jim,

In the mid to late 90's I took about 9 hours of film which I have not yet examined. Should be interesting. I taught myself using visualization and feel. I did get some feedback from friends who commented about the beauty of my hand action through the ball. They didn't know what I was working on but these comments told me I was getting to the hand action I was looking for. This is to question 1.
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David Speckman
David Speckman

March 30th, 2006, 6:19 pm #10

Speck,
1. How difficult was becoming skilled at the basic 'dragging' or reflex action?
2. Was there any particular aspect or element of the swing that presented special difficulty for you?
3. Do you use Blake's grip change and, if so, do you find it to be an easy, natural action?
4. Do you find well bent over posture necessary to properly 'connect' the lower and upper body?
5. In a full swing, what is the level of effort you perceive in your downswing? Would you describe it as (a) a rapid thrusting of the legs toward the target; (b) a firm, slow drive of the legs/knees toward the target; (c) a 'turn' of the legs/hips back to their address position, or (d) something else?
6. Could you give us an idea of your average distances?

Thanks, Jim
One thing I've always struggled with was the pace going back and coming down. I go to fast. I intend to make a focussed effort to find my ideal rhythm when I return to the range next week. I also constantly struggled with what is the appropriate tension and ideal positions of the right and left arms and shoulders.
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Joined: March 28th, 2006, 5:40 pm

March 30th, 2006, 7:51 pm #11

Speck,
1. How difficult was becoming skilled at the basic 'dragging' or reflex action?
2. Was there any particular aspect or element of the swing that presented special difficulty for you?
3. Do you use Blake's grip change and, if so, do you find it to be an easy, natural action?
4. Do you find well bent over posture necessary to properly 'connect' the lower and upper body?
5. In a full swing, what is the level of effort you perceive in your downswing? Would you describe it as (a) a rapid thrusting of the legs toward the target; (b) a firm, slow drive of the legs/knees toward the target; (c) a 'turn' of the legs/hips back to their address position, or (d) something else?
6. Could you give us an idea of your average distances?

Thanks, Jim
Yes,I use and am very comfortable with the grip switch. I'm not even concious of it. It was one of the first things i mastered I do remember it took me awhile to get comfortable with. I even use it when I occasionally mess around with a more conventional swing. I agreed with MB in that the arms and hands tend to work against each other with a conventional grip.
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Joined: September 6th, 2004, 3:46 am

March 31st, 2006, 4:38 am #12


Hello Jim,

In the mid to late 90's I took about 9 hours of film which I have not yet examined. Should be interesting. I taught myself using visualization and feel. I did get some feedback from friends who commented about the beauty of my hand action through the ball. They didn't know what I was working on but these comments told me I was getting to the hand action I was looking for. This is to question 1.
Blake discussed his theory with John Jacobs and Ken Adwick in a Golf World (British magazine) article in the February 1975 issue entitled 'The Golf Swing of the Future: A scientist discusses his theory'. About hand action Mindy said, "The other way [to hit the ball] is to take the club to the top of the backswing and then, using the power of the legs, gradually wind UP on the downswing so that everything is absolutely tight when you hit. During that final bit, just as you keep up the pressure through the ball, the hands 'explode'--it's really a reflex action..." I found the word 'explode' intriguing since that's an image he didn't invoke in either book and some golf writers think of release as like an explosion of the hands. Jim
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Joined: September 6th, 2004, 3:46 am

March 31st, 2006, 4:43 am #13

Speck,
1. How difficult was becoming skilled at the basic 'dragging' or reflex action?
2. Was there any particular aspect or element of the swing that presented special difficulty for you?
3. Do you use Blake's grip change and, if so, do you find it to be an easy, natural action?
4. Do you find well bent over posture necessary to properly 'connect' the lower and upper body?
5. In a full swing, what is the level of effort you perceive in your downswing? Would you describe it as (a) a rapid thrusting of the legs toward the target; (b) a firm, slow drive of the legs/knees toward the target; (c) a 'turn' of the legs/hips back to their address position, or (d) something else?
6. Could you give us an idea of your average distances?

Thanks, Jim
7. Do you shift hips forward (toward the target) during your backswing? SD
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Joined: March 28th, 2006, 5:40 pm

March 31st, 2006, 3:16 pm #14

Speck,
1. How difficult was becoming skilled at the basic 'dragging' or reflex action?
2. Was there any particular aspect or element of the swing that presented special difficulty for you?
3. Do you use Blake's grip change and, if so, do you find it to be an easy, natural action?
4. Do you find well bent over posture necessary to properly 'connect' the lower and upper body?
5. In a full swing, what is the level of effort you perceive in your downswing? Would you describe it as (a) a rapid thrusting of the legs toward the target; (b) a firm, slow drive of the legs/knees toward the target; (c) a 'turn' of the legs/hips back to their address position, or (d) something else?
6. Could you give us an idea of your average distances?

Thanks, Jim
I've experimented with several postures. The feeling I got bending at the waist[well bent over] had good results. The other one I tried often was what I thought was more athletic. I widened my stance, flexed at the knees and assumed a position somewhat like a defensive stance in basketball. I must admit I'm not sure where I stand on the address postion. Another thing I intend to thoroughly examine when I resume my journey next week.
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Joined: March 28th, 2006, 5:40 pm

March 31st, 2006, 3:43 pm #15

Blake discussed his theory with John Jacobs and Ken Adwick in a Golf World (British magazine) article in the February 1975 issue entitled 'The Golf Swing of the Future: A scientist discusses his theory'. About hand action Mindy said, "The other way [to hit the ball] is to take the club to the top of the backswing and then, using the power of the legs, gradually wind UP on the downswing so that everything is absolutely tight when you hit. During that final bit, just as you keep up the pressure through the ball, the hands 'explode'--it's really a reflex action..." I found the word 'explode' intriguing since that's an image he didn't invoke in either book and some golf writers think of release as like an explosion of the hands. Jim
I once read where Jack Nicklaus described one of the best shots he ever hit [some famous iron shot] as being struck with soft hands. Joe Norwood [GOM] talked about releasing legs, hips at the right time. [if I remember right he didn't like the teaching of some excessive drive of the legs and hips until later in the downswing] I think the term explosion is very appropriate in describing the release point in any athletic action.
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