Cocking the wrists

Cocking the wrists

Joined: May 13th, 2007, 1:30 pm

August 13th, 2007, 7:03 pm #1

I read a tip about consciously cocking the wrists during the backswing. The wrist cocked is more towards your chin or trail shoulder on the backswing. I tried it and it seems to give me a little more oomph and better trajectory on my hits.

The article mentioned it was for more of a Two Plane type swing. However, since I have been playing a One Plane type swing for the past 6 weeks, I am wondering... am I heading for disaster? Sometimes I feel I will go hoarse by yelling all those "fores" in my round. I fight a mean duck hook at times.

Thanks
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Joined: April 10th, 2007, 11:58 pm

August 13th, 2007, 8:24 pm #2

A wristock is compatible with a two plane swing - thumbs rising. It is incompatible with a one plane swing - where the right hand FOLDS BACK. If you raise your thumbs in THAT procedure, you take the club off plane because the forearms do not 'roll.'

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Joined: November 27th, 2004, 1:41 pm

August 17th, 2007, 11:03 am #3

George,

Let me first say that your thoughts are enjoyable to read. You're obviously passionate about helping people and your ideas show a lot of thought.

This particular subject is interesting. People can answer the question in a number of ways depending on how things proceed with the takeaway. A person's perspective can be different depending on how long it takes the wrists to set and the extent to which the arms and the torso may or may not move in unison during the backswing. However, most good ballstrikers have achieved a position of radial deviation of the lead hand. To achieve the position, the trail wrist must be folded as you say. Granted at the top, one can have the lead arm anywhere from an under- to overrotated state, but where the back of the lead hand is aligned with the forearm, the trail wrist will be folded.

Perhaps your point is that the "one-plane swing" is one where the hand is not in full radial deviation, i.e., less than fully cocked, and the lead arm is kept in an underrotated state. If so, I supposed that that's one way to swing but I don't think that the good players would say that it would be their preference.

Scott
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Joined: November 27th, 2004, 1:41 pm

September 1st, 2007, 12:42 am #4

A wristock is compatible with a two plane swing - thumbs rising. It is incompatible with a one plane swing - where the right hand FOLDS BACK. If you raise your thumbs in THAT procedure, you take the club off plane because the forearms do not 'roll.'
I'm disappointed that you didn't share your opinions and respond to my post. I assumed that your preference was this "one-plane" thing stuff and I'm curious how you think that one can get a good angle of attack with clubshaft/clubface positioning, with release speed, and without compromising the plane of release when the wrist motion is bend/unbend vs. uncock/rotate. You must be a Houdini - I certainly couldn't do it.

Scott
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Joined: April 10th, 2007, 11:58 pm

September 1st, 2007, 2:12 am #5

Sorry. I haven't paid much attention here lately...missed the post with your query about the wrists.

The folding, the pivot, and the movement of the arms accomplish the 90* "wristcock" in the backswing in the mechanical model I prefer, and it is best characterized as a "no roll", but not a "no pronation" backswing, followed by a direct blow where "roll" or unroll is limited to natural supination UNTIL AFTER RELEASE AND IMPACT, during which the left wrist does unfold and dorsally flex INSTANTANEOUSLY BEFORE the "rolling" supination ALSO permits the rollover of the right hand. But after impact the clubface is not parallel to the arc: it is 45* or so until later. The thumbs RISE and the two elbows bend in unison. The through-the-ball action is "down, under, and up" before any roll occurs.

In reading the new Andrisani book about Tiger's new swing, it is identical to his description of Tiger's release, in which he takes extra trouble to point out that very hand/wrist action -where one TW actually deliberately UNFOLDS his right palm into and through impact, with NO intention to hold it or to twist/roll deliberately into the ball. The procedure as he describes it was making all kinds of bells ring in my head when I read it.

Words, as you know, do not convey 3-D pictures or freeze frames or exertions which are invisible, so there may be terms and concepts where "the message received here was not the message sent."

FWIW, the Andrisani book is pretty clear on it, and my procedure is pretty much as I read his description of Tiger's. And that goes for the hips as well - the left heel rising long before impact, the serious hip slide, etc.

If you haven't seen it, you can't beat it for the money, given the authority of the author AND of his subject...



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Joined: November 27th, 2004, 1:41 pm

September 1st, 2007, 10:22 am #6

Thanks George. I should look for the Andrisani book. I've read of few of his and thought they were very well written.

I do know what you mean - it's very hard to convey certain things in words, especially to describe things that are subtle. I'd really appreciate your trying to give me a better understanding of a few of the things you said so that I can translate them in reference to the picture of my own swing.

1. I'm not sure what you mean by a "no roll" but not a "no pronation" backswing. I assume you're referring to the left arm? How does the arm not roll yet pronate?

2. If I understand, I think you're saying that the left wrist does not dorsally flex until after impact. This sounds quite reasonable and what I think happens in most any good swing. You sort of lost me in the Andrisani part about how Tiger deliberately unfolds his right palm as part of his release. I don't know if deliberately means that Tiger must try to unfold it because it's not going to happen by itself or if it will happen by itself and Tiger does not want to try to prevent it.

What I'm also trying to understand is how the left wrist dorsally flexes after impact with the right wrist unfolding before impact. Is there some way to grip the club that allows for this or is this one of those things that's hard to describe and which happens in 3-D? Those fantastic You-Tube videos of Tiger sure make it look like he's supinating during release. When Tiger's club finally aligns with his left arm, it's pretty darn hard for me to see what his right wrist did or did not do since, as you say, this all happens in 3-D.

Best regards,
Scott
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Joined: April 10th, 2007, 11:58 pm

September 1st, 2007, 12:09 pm #7

Scott:

There is an apparent NATURAL rolling of the arms when they move to the right. A door has its hinge at one edge, and when it opens the plane or surface of the door "opens" - i.e., its plane was facing "north" when it was shut, but it gradually opens to "east". BUT THE HINGES DO NOT GET MOVED OR TWISTED; IT IS THE STRUCTURAL NATURE of the door plane to do that. So it could be said that the opening, or turning, of the door, is a "no roll" action.

When you put your right hand out in front of you with the palm facing the target and then swing your arm to the right without twisting it, THE SHOULDER IS ITS HINGE AND THE PLANE OF YOUR PALM OPENS LIKE THE DOOR DID. So when the hand is, say, halfway back, the palm now faces the target LINE, "east," not the target, "north."

This is what I call a "no roll procedure where its supination is natural." As the club goes back its surface is at first "angled" toward the ground. Then to complete the backswing loadup, as the club continues to the top, the right hand will flex dorsally BUT IT IS NOT NECESSARY THAT THE LEFT THUMB RISE - THAT A WRISTCOCK SHOULD OCCUR - such a vertical motion of the left thumb--of BOTH thumbs--is mimimized. There may be some more cocking at the very TOP, but not necessarily. Wouldn't hoit, but it isn't deliberate and it involves using the bowed left wrist at best, or flat left wrist normally. It will never CUP that wrist, which does take the club off plane.

In the downswing the golfer FEELS THAT HIS HAND IS SQUARE TO HIS PATH. HE DOES NOT HAVE TO DROP INTO A SLOT AND THEN ROLL HIS ARMS FROM WHERE HE WILL THEN ROTATE TO CLOSE THE CLUB. His downswing is a direct blow of the right shoulder, elbow, wristbone--with a bentback right wrist. Incidentally, bending my right wrist with a palms parallel grip does NOT cock my left wrist. So the club is returning to the ball with right palm 'LOADED' big time the same as approaching a tennis ball with the right hand alone - whether with a level swing or to catch a low bouncing ball and hitting it up. The load on the club was about 45*, not 90, since that is the limit of range of motion of the wrist.

IT IS POSSIBLE, AND THIS IS WHAT ANDRISANI SAYS OF TIGER AND AUSTIN SAYS OF HIS SWING, TO UNBEND THE RIGHT WRIST INTENTIONALLY TO ADD FORCE THROUGH IMPACT. This is a point Andrisani made of Tiger with a fairly extended section about his power - imputing the extra zing he gets to that very thing. He never mentions the AJ type of rollover release. Obviously AFTER THE HANDS GET TO FOLLOWTHROUGH THEY MUST ROLL FOR ANATOMICAL REASONS, and at this time the left wrist WILL ALREADY HAVE BENT BACKWARDS - DORSALLY and the right wrist will be flat! It gets flat because the dorsal flexion that was present in the delivery has not only been ALLOWED to release: it is also INTENTIONALLY SHOVED OR SLAPPED OR EXERTED INTO THE BACK OF THE BALL. So at followthrough it is flat and the LEFT wrist is bent back some. THEN the necessary rollover occurs. Milliseconds in the sequence of things.

After impact the two thumbs will RISE AND BE POINTED UP and the two elbows will fold in unison. It is different than wrapping the arms and club around behind the left shoulderblade. The final position is with the shaft VERTICAL to some extent, NOT with it parallel to the ground wrapped behind the neck.

It is possible to roll the hand open by a deliberate action where the INTENTION is to turn the face of the club to parallel with the target line, AND THEN TO COCK THE WRISTS. This is the classic swing - David Toms and others, where the downswing requires the club to drop back down into its slot.

The differences are subtle: there is some plane shift even in the best of the "single plane" bodies, but WHAT IS EXERTED is different, and exertions are invisible. So also is it difficult to distinguish the amount of rolling: we see results but not the actions which are so subtle and which defy interpretation otherwise. If I hold your hand once without squeezing and a second time squeezing, no one else will see the squeezing; if it is a golf club and exertions are present or not, THE CLUB knows, even though no squeezing was observed itself.

It really is not possible REALLY to learn or to teach golf without getting to WHAT IS EXERTED - beyond what is visible. Unfortunately, about 90% of the efforts of golfers and teachers is limited to the visible stuff. Plenty of it is salient, obviously; but insufficient.

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Joined: November 27th, 2004, 1:41 pm

September 2nd, 2007, 2:16 pm #8

Thanks for your explanation George. Please bear with me. I've asked someone on a "sister board" about the procedure you described. The only means I know to achieve true release speed, clubface squaring, and ideal club alignment into impact is by allowing for the lead wrist/hand to uncock and roll. I'm trying to figure out the extent to which your procedure (trail wrist palmar flexion) accomplishes this or inhibits this. If you truly can release to impact with pure palmar flexion, "no roll," and via the "hinges of a door," then I would be curious how you can 1) achieve the downward direction of the blow made possible by uncocking the left wrist "on plane," 3) prevent the left wrist from being bent at impact and giving an undesirable clubface/clubhead position.

Thanks.
Scott
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Joined: April 10th, 2007, 11:58 pm

September 2nd, 2007, 10:02 pm #9

why the left wrist has to uncock. It didn;t cock. Nor why the bendback of the left wrist need be before impact... It isn't. The delivery of the club to the ball is square with unfolding hands, not uncocking hands. - into and after impact. There is a rollover but that is after the pendulum unfolds forward. Subtle but real.

You must be bringing an image to the interpretation that is not the same as I am attempting to portray.

"The message received is not the same as the message sent." --telephone game
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Joined: November 27th, 2004, 1:41 pm

September 2nd, 2007, 11:33 pm #10

George,
I am ernestly trying to see and interpret what you have described. What I don't know is whether you actually perform what I have interpreted or if what you have described is an exaggeration.

This is what I am thinking:
If you perform a "no-roll" swing whereby the back of your left hand exactly and literally faces the arc of the swing at the release point, there is, so to speak, nothing to release. You would be "swinging a 2x4." Any unfolding would cave the left wrist by impact (assuming that your left hand was not in gross palmar flexion). A caved left wrist at impact does not lend itself to a good clubface orientation. You perform palmar flexion of the right hand when you are trying to hit a tennis ball that has already passed you.

I think that you should find that the onset of left wrist uncocking, at the release point, in the direction of the plane with the ensuing "natural" supination affords the simplest way of achieving good clubface orientation as well as release speed. Without uncocking, you would be reducing and negating available momentum transfer to the club.

The reason you see that the left wrist caves after impact in good swings is because those players have no reason to follow natural supination with "hyper-supination" after impact.

Scott

Scott

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Joined: November 11th, 2005, 11:32 pm

September 3rd, 2007, 12:10 am #11

Scott:

There is an apparent NATURAL rolling of the arms when they move to the right. A door has its hinge at one edge, and when it opens the plane or surface of the door "opens" - i.e., its plane was facing "north" when it was shut, but it gradually opens to "east". BUT THE HINGES DO NOT GET MOVED OR TWISTED; IT IS THE STRUCTURAL NATURE of the door plane to do that. So it could be said that the opening, or turning, of the door, is a "no roll" action.

When you put your right hand out in front of you with the palm facing the target and then swing your arm to the right without twisting it, THE SHOULDER IS ITS HINGE AND THE PLANE OF YOUR PALM OPENS LIKE THE DOOR DID. So when the hand is, say, halfway back, the palm now faces the target LINE, "east," not the target, "north."

This is what I call a "no roll procedure where its supination is natural." As the club goes back its surface is at first "angled" toward the ground. Then to complete the backswing loadup, as the club continues to the top, the right hand will flex dorsally BUT IT IS NOT NECESSARY THAT THE LEFT THUMB RISE - THAT A WRISTCOCK SHOULD OCCUR - such a vertical motion of the left thumb--of BOTH thumbs--is mimimized. There may be some more cocking at the very TOP, but not necessarily. Wouldn't hoit, but it isn't deliberate and it involves using the bowed left wrist at best, or flat left wrist normally. It will never CUP that wrist, which does take the club off plane.

In the downswing the golfer FEELS THAT HIS HAND IS SQUARE TO HIS PATH. HE DOES NOT HAVE TO DROP INTO A SLOT AND THEN ROLL HIS ARMS FROM WHERE HE WILL THEN ROTATE TO CLOSE THE CLUB. His downswing is a direct blow of the right shoulder, elbow, wristbone--with a bentback right wrist. Incidentally, bending my right wrist with a palms parallel grip does NOT cock my left wrist. So the club is returning to the ball with right palm 'LOADED' big time the same as approaching a tennis ball with the right hand alone - whether with a level swing or to catch a low bouncing ball and hitting it up. The load on the club was about 45*, not 90, since that is the limit of range of motion of the wrist.

IT IS POSSIBLE, AND THIS IS WHAT ANDRISANI SAYS OF TIGER AND AUSTIN SAYS OF HIS SWING, TO UNBEND THE RIGHT WRIST INTENTIONALLY TO ADD FORCE THROUGH IMPACT. This is a point Andrisani made of Tiger with a fairly extended section about his power - imputing the extra zing he gets to that very thing. He never mentions the AJ type of rollover release. Obviously AFTER THE HANDS GET TO FOLLOWTHROUGH THEY MUST ROLL FOR ANATOMICAL REASONS, and at this time the left wrist WILL ALREADY HAVE BENT BACKWARDS - DORSALLY and the right wrist will be flat! It gets flat because the dorsal flexion that was present in the delivery has not only been ALLOWED to release: it is also INTENTIONALLY SHOVED OR SLAPPED OR EXERTED INTO THE BACK OF THE BALL. So at followthrough it is flat and the LEFT wrist is bent back some. THEN the necessary rollover occurs. Milliseconds in the sequence of things.

After impact the two thumbs will RISE AND BE POINTED UP and the two elbows will fold in unison. It is different than wrapping the arms and club around behind the left shoulderblade. The final position is with the shaft VERTICAL to some extent, NOT with it parallel to the ground wrapped behind the neck.

It is possible to roll the hand open by a deliberate action where the INTENTION is to turn the face of the club to parallel with the target line, AND THEN TO COCK THE WRISTS. This is the classic swing - David Toms and others, where the downswing requires the club to drop back down into its slot.

The differences are subtle: there is some plane shift even in the best of the "single plane" bodies, but WHAT IS EXERTED is different, and exertions are invisible. So also is it difficult to distinguish the amount of rolling: we see results but not the actions which are so subtle and which defy interpretation otherwise. If I hold your hand once without squeezing and a second time squeezing, no one else will see the squeezing; if it is a golf club and exertions are present or not, THE CLUB knows, even though no squeezing was observed itself.

It really is not possible REALLY to learn or to teach golf without getting to WHAT IS EXERTED - beyond what is visible. Unfortunately, about 90% of the efforts of golfers and teachers is limited to the visible stuff. Plenty of it is salient, obviously; but insufficient.
George - When you use your "door hinge" analogy, where in an actual swing is the "hinge" (or "hinges")?

Thanks,
Tom
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Joined: April 10th, 2007, 11:58 pm

September 3rd, 2007, 12:23 am #12

George,
I am ernestly trying to see and interpret what you have described. What I don't know is whether you actually perform what I have interpreted or if what you have described is an exaggeration.

This is what I am thinking:
If you perform a "no-roll" swing whereby the back of your left hand exactly and literally faces the arc of the swing at the release point, there is, so to speak, nothing to release. You would be "swinging a 2x4." Any unfolding would cave the left wrist by impact (assuming that your left hand was not in gross palmar flexion). A caved left wrist at impact does not lend itself to a good clubface orientation. You perform palmar flexion of the right hand when you are trying to hit a tennis ball that has already passed you.

I think that you should find that the onset of left wrist uncocking, at the release point, in the direction of the plane with the ensuing "natural" supination affords the simplest way of achieving good clubface orientation as well as release speed. Without uncocking, you would be reducing and negating available momentum transfer to the club.

The reason you see that the left wrist caves after impact in good swings is because those players have no reason to follow natural supination with "hyper-supination" after impact.

Scott

Scott
Any vertical movement of the left thumb in the TOP of the backswing (wristcock, strictly speaking) is allowed to uncock on the way down pretty early, as compared to the model I believe you are thinking.

But the FOLDED BACK RIGHT HAND = dorsally flexed, REMAINS in that position until a hair before impact--as will a bit of left hand palm flex. The folded positions do not remain folded back completely until the ball is gone: the two hands/wrists are UNFOLDING DURING impact -- the left hand unfolds backwards (dorsally flexes) simultaneously with the right hand flattening. The rollover is later.

It is noteworthy that Austin, Andrisani, and the followers of this concept - many following Austin and many others simply either from instinct of descendents of instruction of the same ilk - agree on this hand action.

Austin got accused of "casting" because of his uncocking so early in the DS. But that is because viewers, and students of the game not intimately taught the subtleties, did not realize the OTHER exertions that are so important AND THAT ANDRISANI TOOK THE TROUBLE TO IDENTIFY AND EMPHASIZE. I.e., the deliberate use of the muscles of the right forearm unfolding the right hand ALONG WITH their own natural release caused by the momentum OF the throw. Just like a fastball pitcher - flicking the wrist WITH DELIBERATE FORCE at the last instant = the tip of a whip assisted by a "snap."

He, Andrisani, and of course Austin, are very clear in the point I make: that the right wrist is unfolding during the last instant prior to impact, reaching a position with the wrist STILL BENT BUT BENT LESS than flattened. The direction of the release is NOT a twisting motion or rolling clubface counterclockwise beyond that necessarily due to the arms moving counterclockwise with respect to the shoulders. The clubFACE releases square to its arc and the golfer's description of his action is "an uppercut punch," "down, under, and up," and sometimes in exaggerations used by SOME who do that to try to get a pupil to get it, a 'cut shot' - which implies a deliberately applied FOREARM clockwise snap, which is NOT what is really done. The exaggeration is to shatter the previous bias and introduce a new feeling; I don't teach that way but I often DO teach by exaggeration when it is not to introduce a DIFFERENT element, where I only want to make clear what the REAL element is supposed to be.

There is an anatomically induced rollover AFTER THE BENDBACK of the left hand - dorsal flexion not as severe you phrase it, -- but the back of the right hand DOES ALIGN WITH THE RIGHT FOREARM and that PUTS the left hand into SOME dorsally flexed orientation. Both hands are never flat to their forearms at the same time.

Take a look at the top of Hogan's followthrough with the club across his back. See the extreme dorsally flexed left wrist. This will occur in this swing.
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Joined: April 10th, 2007, 11:58 pm

September 3rd, 2007, 12:33 am #13

George - When you use your "door hinge" analogy, where in an actual swing is the "hinge" (or "hinges")?

Thanks,
Tom
When I stand with my right hand out in front of me as though to shake your hand, but then swing my arm to my right so my hand "opens like a door," the hinge of that ARM motion is the right shoulder. When I swing my club back and my LEFT arm folds against my left pec, the hinge for THAT is the LEFT shoulder. So each hand must "open" when the arms move to the right of center in a backswing.

You can ADD rotation of the arms to what will occur without adding to the door opening. Or you can NOT add.

I do not add. At the very TOP of a backswing there is some additional wristCOCK, but there is no bending BACK of the left hand - it is either flat or bowed. The right wrist of course remains fully dorsally flexed.

The cocking that occurs is uncocked early into the downswing. But the unfolding is not. It could be said that it takes three 30* folds to make a 90* backswing angle between club and left arm: 30 in the grip itself (you don't extend the club straight out from the arm - the way you hold the club across the hand requires some angle remain even when the wrist is fully uncocked: for the moment let's use 30, just for simplification). 30* is due to FOLDING of the right hand, and 30* is due to the cocking at the top IF there is any. There is not as much as is normally thought, however. If I try to COCK my left hand thumb up, I do not have a range or more than perhaps 15* to do that...

Hope this helps.
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Joined: November 27th, 2004, 1:41 pm

September 3rd, 2007, 2:59 pm #14

Any vertical movement of the left thumb in the TOP of the backswing (wristcock, strictly speaking) is allowed to uncock on the way down pretty early, as compared to the model I believe you are thinking.

But the FOLDED BACK RIGHT HAND = dorsally flexed, REMAINS in that position until a hair before impact--as will a bit of left hand palm flex. The folded positions do not remain folded back completely until the ball is gone: the two hands/wrists are UNFOLDING DURING impact -- the left hand unfolds backwards (dorsally flexes) simultaneously with the right hand flattening. The rollover is later.

It is noteworthy that Austin, Andrisani, and the followers of this concept - many following Austin and many others simply either from instinct of descendents of instruction of the same ilk - agree on this hand action.

Austin got accused of "casting" because of his uncocking so early in the DS. But that is because viewers, and students of the game not intimately taught the subtleties, did not realize the OTHER exertions that are so important AND THAT ANDRISANI TOOK THE TROUBLE TO IDENTIFY AND EMPHASIZE. I.e., the deliberate use of the muscles of the right forearm unfolding the right hand ALONG WITH their own natural release caused by the momentum OF the throw. Just like a fastball pitcher - flicking the wrist WITH DELIBERATE FORCE at the last instant = the tip of a whip assisted by a "snap."

He, Andrisani, and of course Austin, are very clear in the point I make: that the right wrist is unfolding during the last instant prior to impact, reaching a position with the wrist STILL BENT BUT BENT LESS than flattened. The direction of the release is NOT a twisting motion or rolling clubface counterclockwise beyond that necessarily due to the arms moving counterclockwise with respect to the shoulders. The clubFACE releases square to its arc and the golfer's description of his action is "an uppercut punch," "down, under, and up," and sometimes in exaggerations used by SOME who do that to try to get a pupil to get it, a 'cut shot' - which implies a deliberately applied FOREARM clockwise snap, which is NOT what is really done. The exaggeration is to shatter the previous bias and introduce a new feeling; I don't teach that way but I often DO teach by exaggeration when it is not to introduce a DIFFERENT element, where I only want to make clear what the REAL element is supposed to be.

There is an anatomically induced rollover AFTER THE BENDBACK of the left hand - dorsal flexion not as severe you phrase it, -- but the back of the right hand DOES ALIGN WITH THE RIGHT FOREARM and that PUTS the left hand into SOME dorsally flexed orientation. Both hands are never flat to their forearms at the same time.

Take a look at the top of Hogan's followthrough with the club across his back. See the extreme dorsally flexed left wrist. This will occur in this swing.
George,
I performed a few sanity checks myself and then with a swing vision view of Tiger.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wxn0sIkJH8

First, I don't think that the left arm can get to a normal position at the top without rotating. There are just varying degrees that one can rotate that arm. It's easier to see if you focus on the left arm rather than the position of the palm of the right hand. The rotation of the arm can be very deceiving and can depend on how the takeaway is synchronized. What I am saying here is that your "no-roll" feeling may well get you to the same position at the top as someone else who may feel he rolls to the top.

As for losing the left wrist cock early that you likely established at the top, you may feel that you do it, I hope you don't do it, and you shouldn't do it. The reason is that the right hand palmar flexion that you think occurs during release is not exactly palmar flexion; it's ulnar deviation with a bent wrist. That ulnar deviation matches the ulnar deviation, or uncocking, of the left wrist, at least with a normal grip. The hands still roll through release; uncocking without roll doesn't jibe. If you didn't have left wristcock for release, you wouldn't be able to hit the ball.

The "down, under, and up" or what you call the "uppercut" is what you get when you get the left shoulder up through release in order to have 1) shaft lean that is not excessive and 2) the fast release of the bent right arm.

I would doubt that Tiger (or anyone for that matter) tries to flex his right wrist just before impact since it's not pure palmar flexion; it just looks like it is from a face on view during uncocking and roll as the right hand becomes reoriented. Plus, I cannot imagine that he could flex it faster than it otherwise could release. It's better to call the right wrist action a "flexor burst."

If you want to get away from a deliberate right wrist maneuver, get the left shoulder up at deliver and let the left wrist accept and yield to the speed and force of the clubhead and releasing right arm.

Scott

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Joined: November 27th, 2004, 1:41 pm

September 3rd, 2007, 8:21 pm #15

Any vertical movement of the left thumb in the TOP of the backswing (wristcock, strictly speaking) is allowed to uncock on the way down pretty early, as compared to the model I believe you are thinking.

But the FOLDED BACK RIGHT HAND = dorsally flexed, REMAINS in that position until a hair before impact--as will a bit of left hand palm flex. The folded positions do not remain folded back completely until the ball is gone: the two hands/wrists are UNFOLDING DURING impact -- the left hand unfolds backwards (dorsally flexes) simultaneously with the right hand flattening. The rollover is later.

It is noteworthy that Austin, Andrisani, and the followers of this concept - many following Austin and many others simply either from instinct of descendents of instruction of the same ilk - agree on this hand action.

Austin got accused of "casting" because of his uncocking so early in the DS. But that is because viewers, and students of the game not intimately taught the subtleties, did not realize the OTHER exertions that are so important AND THAT ANDRISANI TOOK THE TROUBLE TO IDENTIFY AND EMPHASIZE. I.e., the deliberate use of the muscles of the right forearm unfolding the right hand ALONG WITH their own natural release caused by the momentum OF the throw. Just like a fastball pitcher - flicking the wrist WITH DELIBERATE FORCE at the last instant = the tip of a whip assisted by a "snap."

He, Andrisani, and of course Austin, are very clear in the point I make: that the right wrist is unfolding during the last instant prior to impact, reaching a position with the wrist STILL BENT BUT BENT LESS than flattened. The direction of the release is NOT a twisting motion or rolling clubface counterclockwise beyond that necessarily due to the arms moving counterclockwise with respect to the shoulders. The clubFACE releases square to its arc and the golfer's description of his action is "an uppercut punch," "down, under, and up," and sometimes in exaggerations used by SOME who do that to try to get a pupil to get it, a 'cut shot' - which implies a deliberately applied FOREARM clockwise snap, which is NOT what is really done. The exaggeration is to shatter the previous bias and introduce a new feeling; I don't teach that way but I often DO teach by exaggeration when it is not to introduce a DIFFERENT element, where I only want to make clear what the REAL element is supposed to be.

There is an anatomically induced rollover AFTER THE BENDBACK of the left hand - dorsal flexion not as severe you phrase it, -- but the back of the right hand DOES ALIGN WITH THE RIGHT FOREARM and that PUTS the left hand into SOME dorsally flexed orientation. Both hands are never flat to their forearms at the same time.

Take a look at the top of Hogan's followthrough with the club across his back. See the extreme dorsally flexed left wrist. This will occur in this swing.
George,
After you have had a chance to weed through my babble, bottom line is that if you hit the ball well no matter what you do or think you do, you've succeeded.

But for heaven's sake, make sure your right hand feels "steep" enough with its bend (shaft angled more vertically) at the delivery point so your uncocking (unbending) not only levels off the clubhead but keeps it going downward after impact. The unbending should be sufficiently before impact.

Scott
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