Joined: August 21st, 2010, 5:04 pm

June 12th, 2018, 2:51 am #16

Bumping this back up wondering if Ward took the challenge?

Last year my clematis did just about the same as the previous two years. Grew up, formed buds later than it should have, started yellowing at the base and then the black spot, die off and the stem base rotted off. Even the flowers that opened did not have time to mature the seed pods. :(

This year I did not expect them to come back up but they did! As soon as I saw them I hit it with the systemic fungicide and am repeating the dose every ten days as suggested for black spot on roses. I'm also hitting them with harpin protein every three weeks. That was the former brand named Messenger. Messenger was the only thing that ever worked to open blooms on some heirloom peonies that I have. Anyone interested in harpin protein can look it up as it is too complicated for me the explain how it works, but it does work!

So far this year the clematis is way behind where it should be, but everything here is way behind since our record setting late blizzard April 15-16 this spring (spring my xxx). That blizzard wipe out large areas of grass in my yard, took out 80% of the bee balm plants and every other plant is weeks behind normal growth for this time of year.

I will say that so far (knocking as hard as I can on wood) that the clematis is looking healthier in general than any other year except for it growth rate and bud formation. The leaves are dark green/blue down to the ground level and the spacing of the lateral shoots are closer together this year, not as much stretching as you might see with a plant reaching for sun light.

I will continue the systemic fungicide and harpin protein applications, check the soil ph and hope for the best. I would really love to harvest viable seed from these. I've read it can take up to six years to propagate them from seed but would love many more of them if I can solve the black spot problem I've had.
Pete
Green Bay, WI
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Joined: May 21st, 2013, 12:09 am

June 12th, 2018, 11:53 am #17

Thanks for the reminder, I forgot about this conversation. It sounds like this may be a successful year for you. Let's hope so. Every time I go after this plant it is sold out as it currently is. I did see they have a texesis for sale and it is tempting. The question is have I spent enough this year but if I wait another year that leaves me further behind. The only clematis I grow are to cover up the aphid damaged honeysuckle during the summer as they get over the infestation. Do I bite the bullet and get the texensis?
Southern New Jersey
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Joined: August 21st, 2010, 5:04 pm

June 12th, 2018, 12:36 pm #18

WardDas wrote: Thanks for the reminder, I forgot about this conversation. It sounds like this may be a successful year for you. Let's hope so. Every time I go after this plant it is sold out as it currently is. I did see they have a texesis for sale and it is tempting. The question is have I spent enough this year but if I wait another year that leaves me further behind. The only clematis I grow are to cover up the aphid damaged honeysuckle during the summer as they get over the infestation. Do I bite the bullet and get the texensis?


If I ever get what I consider viable seed I'll gladly share with you or anyone on here that would like to give them a try. There is a huge lack of information about this specific plant, at least that I can find. If you are thinking of planting it in a garden with multiple plants this would be an interesting pairing for this clematis. Maybe not exactly the same but could be done with any flowering plant with the same growth. http://clematisinternational.com/page207.html
Pete
Green Bay, WI
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Joined: May 21st, 2013, 12:09 am

June 12th, 2018, 2:44 pm #19

I am growing Clematis texensis hybrid Duchess of Albany and just noticed another, Princess Diana, on sale for $5.00 at Select Seeds. Whether these hybrids actually attract hummingbirds is an open question, but I doubt it. It is tempting since there are two open posts in need of vines. Posts with no vines attached are somehow offensive to me.
Southern New Jersey
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Joined: August 21st, 2010, 5:04 pm

August 9th, 2018, 6:08 pm #20

I'll probably jinx myself but here goes.
The clematis has topped the eight foot high trellis and has looped around a few times so it is way over ten feet in length at this point.
The hummingbirds are feasting on it about every two to three hours. That also helps by letting me know that they are pollinating so I might get some good seed. That is if the plant doesn't break off at three to four inches from the soil again before the seed is mature.
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Pete
Green Bay, WI
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Joined: March 23rd, 2018, 2:34 am

August 9th, 2018, 9:29 pm #21

The vine is so pretty!!  I have hope of finding one next year and wonder if I grow in a large, large planter would work?  Perhaps over wintering inside would protect it a bit from awful Wisconsin weather?  maybe it would do nothing for the plant at all.  But, I do hope to find a vine next year (I like Ward have searched and find it sold out everywhere).  Did you order from a plant nursery or buy local in Wisconsin?
Marilyn
Appleton, Wisconsin
Zone 5
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Joined: August 21st, 2010, 5:04 pm

August 10th, 2018, 12:37 am #22

Hummer Hostess wrote: The vine is so pretty!!  I have hope of finding one next year and wonder if I grow in a large, large planter would work?  Perhaps over wintering inside would protect it a bit from awful Wisconsin weather?  maybe it would do nothing for the plant at all.  But, I do hope to find a vine next year (I like Ward have searched and find it sold out everywhere).  Did you order from a plant nursery or buy local in Wisconsin?
Hi, I got the plant from Sunlight Gardens.

I don't think it would do well in a large container. What I have found out about it is that the roots can extend up to four feet underground. That would have to be a very large, deep container. Not sure about how far horizontally they extend.

Rich soil, well drained, ph a little on the acidic side. As far as wintering goes, I haven't done anything to protect it and it seems fine, popping up early in the spring. The one that died off was actually protected more as it was right next to the house. It didn't die from exposure, it was the fungus that I've been fighting with.

One article I read actually recommended to re-pot into a large pot the first year and let it get a good root system going. Then plant in the ground the next spring. Clematis usually don't do much the first couple of years so that might not be a bad idea.

If I get any viable seeds I would be willing to share some with you, or anyone else that would like to try them. From what I found is that this clematis seed should be stratified, in the fridge for thirty days, out for a couple of weeks, back in the fridge for thirty days. This needs to be done at least four times. Then you need to use the baggy method with a damp paper towel to get them to sprout. Average time is 180 days for them to sprout and up to three years.
Pete
Green Bay, WI
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Joined: March 23rd, 2018, 2:34 am

August 10th, 2018, 9:25 pm #23

I love the look of the vine Clematis Glaucophylla, (white leaf leather flower).  But, there is a similar vine, Clematis texensis (scarlet leather flower).  Has anyone had more success with the scarlet leather flower?  In researching both vines, seems like people have a more difficult time growing the white leaf variety although both seem to require lots of care.  Both say they are good to zone 5....kind of taking a chance for us Pete but you have had success.  Ward, Brushwood Nursery may have the vines next year, they offer lots and lots of different kinds of clematis, gallon size but not cheap.  I still plan to put one in.  The scarlet variety seems to do well in partial shade (although I have a full sun area too I could plant one in).  Seems like in my research people had a bit easier time with the scarlet vine.  But do they attract hummingbirds, that I am still interested in hearing about.  Anyone who reads this, have you ever tried Clematis texensis and can you share results?  Thanks Pete for your very kind offer of seeds should you have success with your vine. 
Marilyn
Appleton, Wisconsin
Zone 5
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Joined: March 1st, 2006, 9:38 pm

August 11th, 2018, 12:34 am #24

I've only tried Clematis texensis in my zone 4 Red Wing MN garden.  It lasted a few years, making it through 2 or 3 winters without extra protection.  One year it did nicely and grew to about 4 ft and bloomed nicely.  Hummingbirds used the flowers.  I didn't have the ideal site for it, though, and it got crowded out by more vigorous plants in my garden.  I've always intended to give it another try but haven't yet.

By the way, I've tried germinating both C. texensis and glaucophylla seed for a few years, and have yet to have any success.  I've wintersowed them to give them the stratification they need, but nada.  Perhaps I should have kept sown seed for more than one year, in case a second winter would have done the trick.
Donald
Red Wing MN
zone 4
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Joined: March 23rd, 2018, 2:34 am

August 11th, 2018, 3:18 am #25

Thanks Donald for sharing your results and telling me more about how Clematis texensis grew in your garden.  Glad to hear you did see hummingbird use.  Both varieties seem to be difficult to grow (at least for us in the north areas).  It is a pretty vine though and I plan to give one variety a try next year as now they seem to be sold out at the plant nurseries I have found.
Marilyn
Appleton, Wisconsin
Zone 5
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Joined: August 21st, 2010, 5:04 pm

August 11th, 2018, 3:24 am #26

Marilyn, the clematis I have they say that it does best with morning sun but could use more in northern areas. Well, mine only gets filtered sun in the morning and then full sun from around 1:30pm - 6:00pm, and that depends of course on the time of year. I really think that part of the problem I'm having is sun scald on the lower leaves. While the fungus problem starts at the bottom leaves I'm thinking that the further into the summer that it's not so much the fungus as sun scald. I thought it might be a magnesium deficiency or PH out of range but I have adjusted for both. The only thing left is to much hot sun in the afternoon.

Donald, I don't want to know names of private individuals but did you get the seeds from individuals or from a seed company/sharing site? I only ask because they are tricky to get from the plant at the exact right time. I've got paper bags with seeds, some might be okay, others I know I need to toss out.

Also, I'm running into a couple of clematis experts (I guess) that are saying that the stratification to the point of freezing isn't needed for these clematis. Just enough cooling to put the seed to sleep and let it dry properly. I guess it makes some sense as the types of clematis we are talking about are not native to areas that get the weather in the winter that we get.  
Pete
Green Bay, WI
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