Bottlebrush Tree 'Woodlander's Red' Callistemon

Bottlebrush Tree 'Woodlander's Red' Callistemon

Joined: January 1st, 2015, 2:29 am

June 16th, 2016, 1:25 pm #1

Has anyone given this a try? It's supposed to be a bit hardier than other Callistemon, to zone 7.
-Adrienne
(Staten Island, NY Zone ~7)
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Joined: January 1st, 2015, 2:29 am

June 17th, 2016, 1:14 pm #2

In the archives I found posts about Ron patiently growing this for years but it may have never bloomed for him.
-Adrienne
(Staten Island, NY Zone ~7)
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Joined: June 21st, 2006, 1:24 pm

June 17th, 2016, 2:50 pm #3

Has anyone given this a try? It's supposed to be a bit hardier than other Callistemon, to zone 7.
That's too bad Adrienne. Sometimes these plants need more heat and a longer growing season than we are able to provide. As much as I love a challenge, I've found it's always best to focus on what will grow and flower for us rather than what won't (and we are so much cooler than you are here in Wisconsin---we have failed so many times!)
Madison, WI
Zone 5a
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Joined: August 21st, 2012, 2:43 pm

June 17th, 2016, 4:40 pm #4

Has anyone given this a try? It's supposed to be a bit hardier than other Callistemon, to zone 7.
Kathi you make a good point. I think of it as trying to put a square peg in a round hole!

Every time I come back after spending the summer in MA, I toy with the idea of trying a plant that grows there but not recommended for zone 9. After laying so many to rest I have decided that it's no longer worth the effort. I would place the bottlebrush in that category for those in zone 7 or lower, very iffy, even for the smaller varieties, like "Woodlanders Red".



Joe M.
Lakeland, FL
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Joined: May 22nd, 2008, 11:02 am

June 18th, 2016, 5:47 pm #5

Has anyone given this a try? It's supposed to be a bit hardier than other Callistemon, to zone 7.
Adrienne,

Yes - I can confirm, "Woodlander's Hardy" Callistemon never bloomed for me! I tried it both in pots and in the ground, where it barely survived a couple winters - and then sputtered out! So I've had to accept that northern Delaware is not "Callistemon Country"... my conclusion is that "Woodlanders Hardy" might survive Zone 7 lows, but most likely as aberrations in Zone 8 climates!

BUT I've had much more success with the somewhat similar-looking Calliandras (they are hummer plants though MY hummers haven't fed from them that much). They are way easier to grow as potted plants than Callistemon - but they are NOT hardy at all in the Mid-Atlantic area, as far as I know - so assume they are potted plants for you.

This species, below, goes by several names - I recorded it in my 2008 photo album as Calliandra emarginata (perhaps after some debate on this forum) but it may also go by other names (for example, Calliandra haematocephala 'Nana'). Whatever the correct name is, this variety is supposed to be dwarf and it seems to be correct.




And this one below is Calliandra californica (a.k.a. The "Baja Fairyduster"). I believe this species likes it slightly dryer than the previous species - and it seems be slightly hardier, in terms of surviving light frosts - but still, bring it inside before frost if you can:


I believe I got both species mail-order via Almost Eden nursery. I think what I am calling Calliandra emarginata is called Calliandra haematocephala 'Nana' on the Almost Eden web site.
https://almostedenplants.com/shopping/default.asp
Wilmington, Delaware (USDA Zone 7a)
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 3:18 am

June 18th, 2016, 6:55 pm #6

Has anyone given this a try? It's supposed to be a bit hardier than other Callistemon, to zone 7.
Ron, the plant you show as Calliandra emarginata is in fact Calliandra tergemina var emarginata. I have had one for at least 20 years and it kills me to see it labelled as Calliandra emarginata. Mine stayed in a pot for maybe 4 years before being dug up by my 2 dogs [now both gone to puppy dog heaven]. Now it is in the ground, where it can get as tall as 5 feet. It is a very tough plant. However, it receives only occasional hummingbird attention.

Calliandra haematocephala is a very large plant with flowers the size of tennis balls. Joan Garvey, who used to be active on the Forum, has one. I have a large Calliandra that I thought was Calliandra haematocephala, but the leaflets on mine are different from those of Joan's plant, so I do not know what mine is. In the last 6 months, I have developed relationships with a couple of landscape contractors and with a couple of horticulturists at the New Orleans Botanical Garden. I am hoping one of them can identify my plant, which I grew from seed collected from the grounds of a lodge in Costa Rica. Both mine and Joan's receive a lot of attention when hummers are around.

Calliandra californica, Baja Fairy Duster, has been a big winner for me. It grows very slowly at first. A current seedling is only 6 inches tall after 2 years. However, given time, it can grow into a monster. I had one in a half barrel that grew into the ground and nearly undermined the foundation of the house. I moved it into another barrel and farther away from the house. It is now nearly 6 feet tall. When it is in flower and I am hosting hummingbirds, it receives constant attention.

I truly doubt that any of the Calliandra grown in a container will really become good hummingbird attraction because flowering will be relatively sparse.
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA
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Joined: May 22nd, 2008, 11:02 am

June 18th, 2016, 9:50 pm #7

Has anyone given this a try? It's supposed to be a bit hardier than other Callistemon, to zone 7.
Nancy,

Thanks for the correction on the Latin names... I remember it was confusing to get consistent names for these plants back in 2008, when I first got into growing them. But the problem is still, a lot of the nursery industry still uses old and wrong names... and even a lot of the on-line information sources use wrong names... so it's hard to be sure what you are getting. Even worse, if you buy off of eBay!

WHATEVER species I have, they grow easily (in pots) and do attract a hummer or two... so I'll keep them!

Found a few links:
http://www.photomazza.com/Calliandra-te ... emarginata
http://southeastgarden.com/calliandra.html
https://florafaunaweb.nparks.gov.sg/Spe ... px?id=2771
http://swbiodiversity.org/seinet/taxa/i ... axon=50744
Wilmington, Delaware (USDA Zone 7a)
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Joined: May 19th, 2013, 3:18 am

June 19th, 2016, 12:14 pm #8

Has anyone given this a try? It's supposed to be a bit hardier than other Callistemon, to zone 7.
Ron said:<table align="center" width="60%"><tr><td style="font-size:medium;">Quote:
Thanks for the correction on the Latin names... I remember it was confusing to get consistent names for these plants back in 2008, when I first got into growing them. But the problem is still, a lot of the nursery industry still uses old and wrong names... and even a lot of the on-line information sources use wrong names... so it's hard to be sure what you are getting.
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Nan: So true. This is an ongoing problem and it isn't limited to the Calliandra. This is the reason that I use the full scientific name of a plant when I write or speak about it. I want to ensure that if anyone wishes to grow that plant, they will be able to find the plant to which I refer. However, all too often, nurseries and horticulturists who should know better confound my efforts.
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA
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Joined: October 5th, 2005, 3:53 am

June 27th, 2016, 5:52 am #9

Has anyone given this a try? It's supposed to be a bit hardier than other Callistemon, to zone 7.
Hi Everyone! Sorry, it's been a long time since I have visited the forum. I always get such good advice here and I would like to participate more here, but I'm shy. You are such nice people and I just need to do it!

I bought this plant 3 springs ago in a 4 inch pot outside my local grocery store. The label says: Callistemon sieber/Bottle brush "Woodlander's Red" 2X3ft. Part/Full Sun, Evergreen, Red bottlebrush flwrs Jun/Jul. And that is sieber without the "I" on the end.

This is the first year that it is blooming and the hummingbirds are all over it! One perches on it most of the time. It seems to thrive on neglect! I meant to put it in a bigger pot last summer and never got around to it and this year, I decided to wait because it looked like it was getting buds and I didn't want to disturb it. I only remember to water it half the time!

The weather here is usually mild with lots of rain during the winter, but it sure hasn't been typical the last several years. The first winter, this plant survived 2 snowstorms, one with 18 inches of snow, and an ice storm. The second winter was down right crazy with temperatures for a week of barely freezing for highs with lows around zero degrees. Very, very unusual for here and my resident Anna's sure didn't appreciate that. Everyone suffered great losses in their gardens. Last winter was more typical with mild temperature and rain. Last summer we set a new record for the most days over 90 degrees. This year,we had a several day stretch of high 90's, 100's in the beginning of June followed by rain and highs only in the 50's all last week! This week is more normal with sun and mid 80's.

I will put it in a bigger pot after it is done blooming. It looks like it it going to be a weeping shrub, instead of a tree.



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Joined: January 1st, 2015, 2:29 am

June 27th, 2016, 3:09 pm #10

Has anyone given this a try? It's supposed to be a bit hardier than other Callistemon, to zone 7.
Thanks for posting that, Amy! That is interesting information. I wonder if the container environment triggers flowering. Whatever it is your plant looks great. Congrats on that!

The leaves resemble Chilopsis which I'm also experimenting with. Chilopsis "Conchas Dam Pink" performed well although it's a slow grower and I suspect that, despite advertisement claims, it is not unique to other Chilopsis. Dave's Garden also has reviews of other varieties transcending zone challenges perhaps with a little extra care. This, coupled with Chilopsis Bubba's deeper color flowers inspired me to try it as well. I will of course dutifully report my experiences next year.

-Adrienne
(Staten Island, NY Zone ~7)
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Joined: October 5th, 2005, 3:53 am

June 29th, 2016, 5:22 am #11

Has anyone given this a try? It's supposed to be a bit hardier than other Callistemon, to zone 7.
Hi Adrienne! Ha! I wonder if the neglect this plant has received in it's too small container and lack of water does have anything to do with it's flowering. I'm worried that it is it's swan song!

Several years ago, I had another bottle brush tree that only lived a few years here and did flower before it didn't make it though the winter.

I had to look up Chilopsis as I haven't heard of that one. Does it attract hummingbirds? Keep us posted on how it does.
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