Aquilegia canadensis 'Little Lanterns'

Aquilegia canadensis 'Little Lanterns'

Joined: March 1st, 2006, 9:38 pm

May 17th, 2017, 2:58 am #1

This is a nice compact cultivar of the eastern columbine. It grows not much more than a foot tall but is very floriferous and the flowers are a more intense red than the species. It also begins blooming about a week earlier than the species here. I started a bunch from seed I got in an exchange and planted them out in the hummingbird garden I take care of at a local park. They are in full bloom now and are putting on a nice show. They are short but would be nice in a container or, as here, on the edge of a raised bed:

Donald
Last edited by Ornithophilous on May 18th, 2017, 3:33 am, edited 1 time in total.
Donald
Red Wing MN
zone 4
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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

May 17th, 2017, 9:25 am #2

A local nursery was selling little lanterns a few years ago but haven't seen them since. It is a nice contact plant especially for those with smaller spaces. Another one that does very well for me here is the desert columbine. It blooms later in the season but it blooms longer and the flowers have more yellow than red. It is a little shorter than canadensis but bushier
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: March 1st, 2006, 9:38 pm

May 18th, 2017, 3:46 am #3

This is a nice compact cultivar of the eastern columbine. It grows not much more than a foot tall but is very floriferous and the flowers are a more intense red than the species. It also begins blooming about a week earlier than the species here. I started a bunch from seed I got in an exchange and planted them out in the hummingbird garden I take care of at a local park. They are in full bloom now and are putting on a nice show. They are short but would be nice in a container or, as here, on the edge of a raised bed:

Donald
Penny:

Nice to hear from you. By desert columbine do you mean A. desertorum? I've grown that one, too, but can never get it to persist in the garden for long. I love the pale bluish foliage and orangey flowers. I've really enjoyed A. triternata, also from the southwest. It is larger in form and doesn't have the beautiful pale blue foliage of A. desertorum, but it blooms a full month later than A. canadensis so I can get extended columbine bloom in the garden. This year I've got three Aquilegia eximia I planted last year. They survived the winter with some extra protection and I'm hoping they bloom well and later in the season. They are off to a good start vegetatively, but so far no signs of flower buds. If I can collect seed, I'm going to see if the three plants can survive unprotected next winter.

Here is another gratuitous shot of the 'Little Lanterns':


Donald
Donald
Red Wing MN
zone 4
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Joined: June 21st, 2006, 1:24 pm

May 18th, 2017, 5:11 am #4

This is a nice compact cultivar of the eastern columbine. It grows not much more than a foot tall but is very floriferous and the flowers are a more intense red than the species. It also begins blooming about a week earlier than the species here. I started a bunch from seed I got in an exchange and planted them out in the hummingbird garden I take care of at a local park. They are in full bloom now and are putting on a nice show. They are short but would be nice in a container or, as here, on the edge of a raised bed:

Donald
That is a very beautiful display Don! We struggle to keep any Columbine going in our super rich, moist soil, but a few always come back every season and grow where they want to. Amazing the one Columbine canadensis has never crossed with the few vulgaris plants we have growing, which amazes me. We have never observed any use of Columbine by the spring hummingbirds unfortunately, but I bet with a large area of red Columbine like this, they would use it---have you observed this? Also, these plants will only bloom in spring--what do you do with the area for the rest of the season? Anyhow, just gorgeous to observe.
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Joined: August 6th, 2016, 5:49 pm

May 18th, 2017, 1:55 pm #5

This is a nice compact cultivar of the eastern columbine. It grows not much more than a foot tall but is very floriferous and the flowers are a more intense red than the species. It also begins blooming about a week earlier than the species here. I started a bunch from seed I got in an exchange and planted them out in the hummingbird garden I take care of at a local park. They are in full bloom now and are putting on a nice show. They are short but would be nice in a container or, as here, on the edge of a raised bed:

Donald
Love all the blooms Donald looks great! I am growing two Serpentine Columbines as well, I ordered them over a month ago from Annie's Annuals I will be shocked if they bloom this year but they are off to a great start. I will keep everyone posted as they come along.
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Joined: June 21st, 2006, 1:24 pm

May 18th, 2017, 4:02 pm #6

This is a nice compact cultivar of the eastern columbine. It grows not much more than a foot tall but is very floriferous and the flowers are a more intense red than the species. It also begins blooming about a week earlier than the species here. I started a bunch from seed I got in an exchange and planted them out in the hummingbird garden I take care of at a local park. They are in full bloom now and are putting on a nice show. They are short but would be nice in a container or, as here, on the edge of a raised bed:

Donald
Our Serpentine Columbine from Annie's Annuals that was planted last season definitely died and is not coming back. Dylan, I will be interested to see how yours does and if hummingbirds will use it---please keep us posted.
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Joined: September 10th, 2011, 4:19 pm

May 19th, 2017, 3:30 am #7

This is a nice compact cultivar of the eastern columbine. It grows not much more than a foot tall but is very floriferous and the flowers are a more intense red than the species. It also begins blooming about a week earlier than the species here. I started a bunch from seed I got in an exchange and planted them out in the hummingbird garden I take care of at a local park. They are in full bloom now and are putting on a nice show. They are short but would be nice in a container or, as here, on the edge of a raised bed:

Donald
Donald,
That looks like a great selection. And it reminded me it was time to deadhead my A. canadensis. I removed about 300 spent blooms/pods. Lots of buds coming, but I notice many will not develop without deadheading. The columbine is getting a little use.
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Joined: September 16th, 2005, 12:08 pm

May 19th, 2017, 12:11 pm #8

This is a nice compact cultivar of the eastern columbine. It grows not much more than a foot tall but is very floriferous and the flowers are a more intense red than the species. It also begins blooming about a week earlier than the species here. I started a bunch from seed I got in an exchange and planted them out in the hummingbird garden I take care of at a local park. They are in full bloom now and are putting on a nice show. They are short but would be nice in a container or, as here, on the edge of a raised bed:

Donald
Donald
Yes I have the A. desertorum. Oddly enough it is growing in an area where the soil stays very damp most of the year except the hottest part of the summer. I was looking at the original plant yesterday and I couldn't get over how big it has gotten. I would like to get a few more stated.
Penny
Zone 6a
Western NY state
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Joined: March 1st, 2006, 9:38 pm

May 20th, 2017, 4:16 am #9

This is a nice compact cultivar of the eastern columbine. It grows not much more than a foot tall but is very floriferous and the flowers are a more intense red than the species. It also begins blooming about a week earlier than the species here. I started a bunch from seed I got in an exchange and planted them out in the hummingbird garden I take care of at a local park. They are in full bloom now and are putting on a nice show. They are short but would be nice in a container or, as here, on the edge of a raised bed:

Donald
Kathi:

I don't hold it against columbine that it only blooms during the early part of the season. I like the foliage so after it is done blooming and I've collected all the seed I want, I cut back the flowering stalks to leave the mound of foliage. If for some reason it still looks untidy, one can cut it all the way back and it will regrow a fresh mound of foliage. The foliage provides a nice green foreground for the taller hummingbird garden plants that bloom in mid to late summer such as Monarda didyma, Silene regia, Ipomopsis rubra, and Delphinium exaltatum.

One problem we have in the Upper Midwest is having blooming plants available when the hummingbirds return. Columbine is one of the few hardy species that blooms early enough for returning hummingbirds. When I am out birding in the spring in natural areas, I always look for hummingbirds where I find large patches of blooming columbine, large stands of blooming Ribes shrubs, or good patches of blooming spring woodland ephemerals such as Virginia bluebells. I think one is more likely to get visits to a particular species of plant in the garden when there is a large clump of them, so I try to plant enough of them together to draw the attention of hummingbirds and provide enough nectar to make a foraging bout worth their while and to encourage return visits.

In my old garden, I got regular early season visits to a large bank of native columbine that I planted. I haven't witnessed use of 'Little Lanterns' yet at the park garden I maintain, but this is a new plant for me and I haven't had the time to conduct a 'stake out' in the garden yet to check for use. This Sunday I hope to spend some time at the garden to see if it is getting used. We had a hailstorm earlier this week and about 4 inches of rain, and another inch or so expected tomorrow, so hopefully it will still be blooming nicely! I'll report back if I see any use.

Donald
Donald
Red Wing MN
zone 4
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Joined: June 21st, 2006, 1:24 pm

May 20th, 2017, 5:34 am #10

This is a nice compact cultivar of the eastern columbine. It grows not much more than a foot tall but is very floriferous and the flowers are a more intense red than the species. It also begins blooming about a week earlier than the species here. I started a bunch from seed I got in an exchange and planted them out in the hummingbird garden I take care of at a local park. They are in full bloom now and are putting on a nice show. They are short but would be nice in a container or, as here, on the edge of a raised bed:

Donald
Thanks Donald. It is such a beautiful display and too bad it's not available for the fall migration. That is one of the downfalls of using perennial plants. I give you much credit for designing this kind of a garden.

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