Essbase Resource

Essbase Resource

Joined: May 30th, 2012, 8:28 pm

May 30th, 2012, 8:30 pm #1

Question for everyone: Where are all the Essbase developers? We are trying to hire a fulltime Essbase developer in the Chicago area. We are offering a competitive compensation package and are receiving little to no activity. We are using multiple recruiters and have posted the jobs on all the major job sites (i.e. Dice, Indeed, Monster, etc.).

Why are we not getting any activity?
- Is the field so hot that there just aren't enough developers to go around?
- Or is Essbase on the way out and people just aren't getting trained?
- Or is consulting so good right now and paying so well that that people are not interested in fulltime positions? I always thought developers wanted a fulltime position to avoid the travel demands that usually come with a consulting gig.

I've been in the Hyperion world for 10+ years now and I just don't know what to make of it. Also if anyone knows of good recruiters in the Chicago area that specialize in Hyperion please let me know.

Obviously this is meant to be more of a discussion but if anyone is interested in finding more about the job please let me know.

Looking forward to Kscope.

Thanks
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Joined: November 15th, 2007, 1:21 pm

May 30th, 2012, 9:36 pm #2

What you're experiencing is common.

Why? The field is hot and consulting is lucrative. Definitely not because Essbase is on the way out.

I'm not sure what your idea of competitive is, maybe it's not as competitive as you think?

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Tim Faitsch
Tim Faitsch

May 31st, 2012, 12:52 am #3

Question for everyone: Where are all the Essbase developers? We are trying to hire a fulltime Essbase developer in the Chicago area. We are offering a competitive compensation package and are receiving little to no activity. We are using multiple recruiters and have posted the jobs on all the major job sites (i.e. Dice, Indeed, Monster, etc.).

Why are we not getting any activity?
- Is the field so hot that there just aren't enough developers to go around?
- Or is Essbase on the way out and people just aren't getting trained?
- Or is consulting so good right now and paying so well that that people are not interested in fulltime positions? I always thought developers wanted a fulltime position to avoid the travel demands that usually come with a consulting gig.

I've been in the Hyperion world for 10+ years now and I just don't know what to make of it. Also if anyone knows of good recruiters in the Chicago area that specialize in Hyperion please let me know.

Obviously this is meant to be more of a discussion but if anyone is interested in finding more about the job please let me know.

Looking forward to Kscope.

Thanks
I was an Essbase team lead looking for resources as recently as last fall. It was very difficult. Finding a full time employee was impossible, finding a decent consultant my company was willing to pay for was almost as difficult. So I left that position to get back into consulting myself. The pay is better than what I would make as a lower or mid level manager. There still aren't that many good resources out there. I have some theories as to why there aren't but that conversation would be best had over beer...
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Anonymous
Anonymous

May 31st, 2012, 4:16 am #4

That's funny. I left management too and went independent. More work and less money is a difficult equation to get happy with.

Some thoughts on why there are so few good Hyperion administrators available:

1. No College Hires

I've been independent for years, and during that time I've worked with many Hyperion consulting firms. None of them have done any significant college hiring for years. When you attend Hyperion events (conferences, user groups, etc) look around. There are no young professionals. The supply of potential admins is limited by the lack of new consultants who will eventually get tired of travel.

2. Learning Curve

It takes years to become *decent* at Essbase. And then there are all of the other apps (Planning, FR, WA, FDM, SmartView, and so on). If you're just starting out, this looks like a big mountain. When many of us older people started, Essbase was a lot simpler and we climbed the peak gradually. It's intimidating to new resources.

3. Fear of Outsourcing

Most everything is getting outsourced. For years, I thought Hyperion outsourcing would take off and rates would drop. I frequently thought about backup plans for when everything went downhill. Fortunately, it's very difficult to outsource effectively and I've been proven wrong year after year. But new resources who might enter the field probably consider this.

4. Oracle Sales Force

Say what you will about Larry Ellison, but he knows how to motivate a sales force. Oracle sells the you-know-what out of this software. It doesn't hurt that what they're selling is such a great product, but that alone doesn't get me projects. The number of Hyperion clients has grown faster than the number of qualified admins.

5. Most admin jobs lack appeal (I know . . . not ALL, but most.)

Admin jobs are often demotivating. When you work as an admin, you're typically a cost centre, and most companies treat their employees that way. They want to minimize your pay, training and other benefits. In consulting, you're a profit center. When you generate revenue for a company, you're treated differently. Companies want to invest in you to maximize your revenue generating capacity. Your goals are aligned with company goals. (with the exception of travel) Many good admins are lured away by consulting.

6. Money

Back in the 90's, it was common to see big signing bonuses thrown around. Raises were large. At some point, the IT industry took a collective step back and got control of escalating IT labor costs. The problem is that the Hyperion salaries most companies are willing to pay have not reached equilibrium with the limited supply of resources. I get at least three calls a week from recruiters asking me to cut my income in half. I used to return every call I got from a recruiter, but I've come to the conclusion that it's generally not a productive use of my time. If you aren't finding quality candidates, you are simply not offering enough of something . . . and it's probably money.

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Tim Faitsch
Tim Faitsch

May 31st, 2012, 11:34 am #5

Higher billing rates also encourage even higher billing rates. New, inexperienced entrants are encouraged into the field because of the high rates, they tend to leave bad impressions on their clients who are later willing to pay even more for talent.

My favorite interview story was when the prospect got stumped by a simple question and decided it would be best to hang up on me. The next day I got the exact same resume I had the day before with only the name being changed. I was not happy with the recruiter...

It's funny that clients will pay 500k on a consultant for a year but won't pay more than 100k for the person to come on full time. It gets really complicated when developers make more than their manager...

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Anonymous
Anonymous

May 31st, 2012, 12:59 pm #6

That's funny. I left management too and went independent. More work and less money is a difficult equation to get happy with.

Some thoughts on why there are so few good Hyperion administrators available:

1. No College Hires

I've been independent for years, and during that time I've worked with many Hyperion consulting firms. None of them have done any significant college hiring for years. When you attend Hyperion events (conferences, user groups, etc) look around. There are no young professionals. The supply of potential admins is limited by the lack of new consultants who will eventually get tired of travel.

2. Learning Curve

It takes years to become *decent* at Essbase. And then there are all of the other apps (Planning, FR, WA, FDM, SmartView, and so on). If you're just starting out, this looks like a big mountain. When many of us older people started, Essbase was a lot simpler and we climbed the peak gradually. It's intimidating to new resources.

3. Fear of Outsourcing

Most everything is getting outsourced. For years, I thought Hyperion outsourcing would take off and rates would drop. I frequently thought about backup plans for when everything went downhill. Fortunately, it's very difficult to outsource effectively and I've been proven wrong year after year. But new resources who might enter the field probably consider this.

4. Oracle Sales Force

Say what you will about Larry Ellison, but he knows how to motivate a sales force. Oracle sells the you-know-what out of this software. It doesn't hurt that what they're selling is such a great product, but that alone doesn't get me projects. The number of Hyperion clients has grown faster than the number of qualified admins.

5. Most admin jobs lack appeal (I know . . . not ALL, but most.)

Admin jobs are often demotivating. When you work as an admin, you're typically a cost centre, and most companies treat their employees that way. They want to minimize your pay, training and other benefits. In consulting, you're a profit center. When you generate revenue for a company, you're treated differently. Companies want to invest in you to maximize your revenue generating capacity. Your goals are aligned with company goals. (with the exception of travel) Many good admins are lured away by consulting.

6. Money

Back in the 90's, it was common to see big signing bonuses thrown around. Raises were large. At some point, the IT industry took a collective step back and got control of escalating IT labor costs. The problem is that the Hyperion salaries most companies are willing to pay have not reached equilibrium with the limited supply of resources. I get at least three calls a week from recruiters asking me to cut my income in half. I used to return every call I got from a recruiter, but I've come to the conclusion that it's generally not a productive use of my time. If you aren't finding quality candidates, you are simply not offering enough of something . . . and it's probably money.
And then you have employers who will not pay for training or conferences or even books because they fear you will leave and go consulting, so whatever you glean from sites like this is OJT and only partial, never complete
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Joined: November 15th, 2007, 1:21 pm

May 31st, 2012, 1:19 pm #7

Higher billing rates also encourage even higher billing rates. New, inexperienced entrants are encouraged into the field because of the high rates, they tend to leave bad impressions on their clients who are later willing to pay even more for talent.

My favorite interview story was when the prospect got stumped by a simple question and decided it would be best to hang up on me. The next day I got the exact same resume I had the day before with only the name being changed. I was not happy with the recruiter...

It's funny that clients will pay 500k on a consultant for a year but won't pay more than 100k for the person to come on full time. It gets really complicated when developers make more than their manager...
As for your last sentence (complicated), you're so right. I've seen cases where the Hyperion resource(s) report to a high level director or even the CIO/VP-IT on the org chart, but work day to day with lower level IT managers.

All this said, while this is maybe good for us, it's not necessarily good for the tools in general. Many potential Hyperion customers consider technical resource availability and rates when choosing tools.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

May 31st, 2012, 1:48 pm #8

I absolutely agree with your last point and this needs to be addressed for Hyperion to compete with the competition. We need to start training the younger generation to keep admin/jr. developer costs down. If corporations have no one to support the tools then they're going to choose a different tool.

Most likely our only option is to hire someone with potential and then send them to training. Hopefully other corporations are doing.
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Sean V
Sean V

May 31st, 2012, 2:36 pm #9

Hire someone with Potential. Train them. Then loose them to others with deeper pockets.

Cynical, yes.
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Joined: November 16th, 2003, 11:27 pm

May 31st, 2012, 9:55 pm #10

Question for everyone: Where are all the Essbase developers? We are trying to hire a fulltime Essbase developer in the Chicago area. We are offering a competitive compensation package and are receiving little to no activity. We are using multiple recruiters and have posted the jobs on all the major job sites (i.e. Dice, Indeed, Monster, etc.).

Why are we not getting any activity?
- Is the field so hot that there just aren't enough developers to go around?
- Or is Essbase on the way out and people just aren't getting trained?
- Or is consulting so good right now and paying so well that that people are not interested in fulltime positions? I always thought developers wanted a fulltime position to avoid the travel demands that usually come with a consulting gig.

I've been in the Hyperion world for 10+ years now and I just don't know what to make of it. Also if anyone knows of good recruiters in the Chicago area that specialize in Hyperion please let me know.

Obviously this is meant to be more of a discussion but if anyone is interested in finding more about the job please let me know.

Looking forward to Kscope.

Thanks
If you wouldn't mind, it may help the conversation if you tell us what the "competitive compensation package" is.

When I first got out of school I went to work in a car dealership and the first thing I learned when dealing with a customer who was looking to buy a car was to beware of when someone said they wanted it "fully loaded". As it turns out the term "fully loaded" means different things to different people. To some people a fully loaded vehicle had A/C and power windows, to others they expected leather, premium sound system, moon roof, nav, etc.

A competitive compensation package is a very subjective thing and too often what the employer feels is competitive is usually on the low end of average. The low end of average is good for someone who is currently unemployed, but for someone who is working, and most good Essbase people are working, you have to ask the question of why would someone leave where they are for a comparable compensation package. Unless the person is very unhappy, in which case they are the ones actively looking, it is going to take more than a comparable package to motivate someone uproot their professional life and make a move. Changing jobs is a big deal and for most people even an increase of a few percent is not going to motivate them to take the chance on moving. This is even more relevant given the current economic situation where people have to ask themselves "what if I make a move and the company then decides to lay me off because I am the new guy?". So now this person has to factor into their decision to make a move the risk involved. "What if the new boss doesn't like me?", "I've already proven myself in my current company, do I really want to go somewhere new and have to prove myself again?" Certainly there can be a challenging element to the new position that makes it worthwhile, but ultimately anyone with a good job today is taking a risk making a move and frankly if the compensation bump is not sufficient, many will not entertain the thought.

For most of us who have been around a while we have learned that the grass isn't really greener from one place to the next, every once in a while something special comes along, but in general, most places are the same, with some good points and some not so good points. So besides having a competitive compensation package you have to ask yourself if your company really provides something of value that will attract people. How are the benefits, what is the support for career growth, what kind of ongoing training are you going to provide, what commitment to the technology stack are you presenting to applicants? All of these things have to be factored in.

Lastly on the compensation, it doesn't help when employers post that they are offering a competitive compensation package. That is an overused term that no one pays attention to. Please know I am not calling you out on this, all employers do it. The reasoning behind it baffles me (I have been a hiring manager in a few companies, and it always seems to be the same underlying reasoning that no one wants to say) but basically there is this haggling mentality out there that you can't put your best offer forward. Some of the reasoning is around the "what if I could have gotten them cheaper?". Then there is the fear the person will want more than the offered salary. There is the concern if you post too low no one will respond and if you post too high, everyone will respond including those not qualified. At the end of the day, wouldn't it be better if we just called it as it is? Put your best offer out there, if it is truly competitive and enticing, your phone will ring off the hook and you can find the best applicant. If no one calls then you know you are not offering enough to lore someone away.

Again, this is not meant for you directly, but for all employers, we should just put it out there and then run with it, when someone asks for more, you tell them that is your best offer, if it was enough to get them to send in their resume then they are likely willing to accept it. I think we could all do a lot better if we skip the negotiation dance and just put it all out there.

Anyway that is just my opinion on the subject. I also agree with what others have stated about not enough fresh talent coming into the market.
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