Need Some Advice

Anything to do with 17th century and 18th century smoothbores, pistols, and rifles.
swampfox
Woodsrunner
Woodsrunner
Joined: 24 Mar 2016, 22:02

Unread post 06 Aug 2017, 22:22 #1

When I first received my rifle after purchasing it second hand online, I noticed that there was a pin hole through the flash pan into the lock internals ( the seller did not provide a close up picture of this area of the lock) . All purchases were final, the barrel was in good condition, and the lock was crisp and sharp so I decided to keep it and have had it for the last 2 years.

Anyhow, I would love to find some means to remedy this little problem. The gun is custom, built in the 80's from all the clues I've found. The lock is from Dixie Gun Works and was the prototype lock made before they first began making their Tennessee mountain rifle, it was called the Lancaster lock. I can order a lock plate from them, but it will be a complete blank needing to be drilled and tapped.

What say you, should I find a machinist and replace the plate, or is there a adequate solution that I can fabricate?
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Le_Loup
Captain of Scouts
Captain of Scouts
Joined: 09 Nov 2010, 06:56

Unread post 10 Aug 2017, 01:21 #2

swampfox wrote: When I first received my rifle after purchasing it second hand online, I noticed that there was a pin hole through the flash pan into the lock internals ( the seller did not provide a close up picture of this area of the lock) . All purchases were final, the barrel was in good condition, and the lock was crisp and sharp so I decided to keep it and have had it for the last 2 years.

Anyhow, I would love to find some means to remedy this little problem. The gun is custom, built in the 80's from all the clues I've found. The lock is from Dixie Gun Works and was the prototype lock made before they first began making their Tennessee mountain rifle, it was called the Lancaster lock. I can order a lock plate from them, but it will be a complete blank needing to be drilled and tapped.

What say you, should I find a machinist and replace the plate, or is there a adequate solution that I can fabricate?

20170806_164109[1].jpg
Is this hole through the pan a clean hole like a drilled hole, or is it a moulding fault? These questions are always difficult to answer, because i am not there to see for myself. If it is a clean drilled hole I would get some brass rod or braising rod of the right size (you may have to file it to fit) & tap it into the hole. If it is a misshapen moulding fault then one could drill it out or at least drill part way & again use some brass or steel rod to tap in & seal the hole. If the rod was not a tight fit, you can use a center punch to peen the rod tip once in & this would spread the tip & make it tight in the hole.

Another easier solution certainly worth trying first would be to get a piece of lead & using a small ball peen hammer, tap the lead into the hole. This should seal it & the heat from a quick flash is not likely to melt the lead. What do you think? 
Keith.
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less traveled by,
and that has made all the difference.

Robert Frost.

Captain, Armidale NSW Australia chapter.
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/
http://australiansurvivalandpreppers.blogspot.com.au/
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swampfox
Woodsrunner
Woodsrunner
Joined: 24 Mar 2016, 22:02

Unread post 11 Aug 2017, 00:23 #3

A perfectly brilliant idea Keith, thank you!!!

The hole has squarish corners, but I'll manage. Great thing is I have access to scrap pieces of wire in various gauges at work.
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