Alcohol?

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Alcohol?

damjan
Pilgrim (M)
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Joined: 24 Sep 2013, 21:09

26 Jan 2014, 05:22 #1

I was wondering... What did people in 18th century drink? Of course, except soft drinks :mrgreen:

I most movies you can see sailors drinking rum but is that rum somewhat different that todays rum? Maby made a little bit differently (disstillation, ingidients...)? Where then as many types of it like today?
And whiskys (malts especially)... In the begining of 18th century there was something about taxes in England that forsed everybody that produced whisky there to either go underground or stop producing it at all. Only a handfull of people produced it legaly. Only later in 19th century did whisky became more popular in Europe.

So, what did people drink then? Beer mostly like today (I guess) but I think it was also a little bit different. What did poor farmers drink, what middling sort and what did rich people drink?
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see through the master,
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RedWolf
Woodsrunner
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Joined: 25 Jul 2013, 06:54

26 Jan 2014, 07:09 #2

Grog. 1/4 rum in water, to kill the parasites. Sailors drank it up until the 1980's.
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Le_Loup
Captain of Scouts
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Joined: 09 Nov 2010, 06:56

26 Jan 2014, 07:48 #3

Beer was popular both in England & the New World. Water as is was not safe to drink, so even children drank beer. Workers drank small beer when working because it was not as strong. Rum was very popular. Whilst it was at times watered down (especially in the 19th century when traded at fur trade Rendezvous), in general it was I think much the same as we have today.
Gin was a poor people's drink as it was so cheap. Traders could guarantee to get you drunk for just a penny if I remember correctly. Gin drinking was a big problem, & English artist William Hogarth painted life as it was at the time.
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Gin Lane by Hogarth.
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Another one by Hogarth in which punch appears to be the drink.
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Another one where punch appears to be the drink, this one in Germany, late 18th century.
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less traveled by,
and that has made all the difference.

Robert Frost.

Captain, Armidale NSW Australia chapter.
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/
http://australiansurvivalandpreppers.blogspot.com.au/
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RedWolf
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Joined: 25 Jul 2013, 06:54

26 Jan 2014, 15:54 #4

I believe it was the Mayflower that put in to shore weeks before reaching where her contract stated because the Pilgrims needed to brew more beer. By the by, for clarification, it is my understanding that small beer is what we would today call a "nonalcoholic" beer?

I believe that my beloved stouts where in vogue during the time period. Guinness Brewery of St. James Gate Dublin was founded in 1759, and all they make is a lovely(in draft) black stout.
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Wayfinder
Journeyman Woodsrunner
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Joined: 15 Sep 2013, 19:54

27 Jan 2014, 03:22 #5

Don't forget about Irish corn whiskey "Moonshine"
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RedWolf
Woodsrunner
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Joined: 25 Jul 2013, 06:54

27 Jan 2014, 03:56 #6

Aye, the "mountain dew". Whiskey, which is based upon a lack of safe storage for crops, so you ferment(let rot), then basically stew(VERY basically) to turn it into a usable substance. Technically, alcohol is the jerky of the plant world, an very overlooked fact in the modern age of "pop a top" and blowing off steam.

I know that until something like the 1950's in most places, by my understanding, wine was by far the most common any time drink. In the Caribbean, at places like Port Royal(?) where they are finally excavating Pirate ruins, it's clay pipe fragments and very specifically wine bottles they are finding in the majority. Wine has the shelf life for travel, the low or easily water down alcohol percentage, and frankly doesn't taste as much like crap after you have been drinking the same basic brew for months on end.

I also know that America has her ciders. I cannot say when it truly began, probably closer to the end of our period than the beginning, but it is there.

Brandys, which are distilled wines to further aid in there traveling abilities. Or wine grapes, something along those lines. From when France used to import wines to the Dutch(?), and there were complaints about how the wine traveled. After the invention of brandy, they quit asking for wine! That is that story, as I understand its modern origins. A search of Brandy popped this up

http://myplace.frontier.com/~mshapiro_42/cspirits.html

I will second the gin epidemic. Distilled from juniper berries, has a weird citrus/turpentine flavor that clashes hard with my taste buds.

It will be too soon for bourbon, which is Kentucky/Tennessee whiskey. That comes after Culloden, I would say. Whiskey and buckskins were so prized that they served as currency on the frontier in there basic form. There is a reason Americans call money a "buck".

It is important to note that the current modern drive is for beers with a high percentage of hops and alcohol content coming out in the finished product. At the time, beers were of a darker, deeper flavor on the whole, to better suit the diet and simple lone drinking. The alcohol content was lower, as it was replacing water in many instances(no one understood filtering or boiling, except for brewers), and led to the still modern custom of European "conversation" beers is what we call them over here in the U.S., since it takes a larger number to get you drunk, and you are more likely to hold a conversation with those around you when drinking them.

You know, I hardly drink anymore, but these write ups make me look like a rather informed drunk! Haha. That's my two cents for now.
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RedWolf
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Joined: 25 Jul 2013, 06:54

27 Jan 2014, 04:14 #7

On the subject of rum, there are two major type of rum, maybe three, depending upon how you split it.

Light rum is what most people are used to seeing nowadays. Think Bacardi or Captain Morgan, that is the only common ones I can think of around here. Light rum is clear to light caramel in color, and is intended for mixing cocktails. Probably not all that period, but there is always some lee way.

Dark rums are very common traditionally. They are brown to almost black, often containing a higher alcohol content than the light rum, and are intended to be drank as is.

Then there are spiced rums. Most rums are spiced, which is rum that has had spices added to the alcohol at some point, usually during the aging process in the barrel. It's honestly the flavor and characteristic that most people think of when they think of rum. Then there are non spiced rums. Generally less common, they have more in common with moonshine than rum, and their use is dependent upon the drinker, honestly.
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Bedford
Settler (M)
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Joined: 03 May 2013, 02:11

28 Jan 2014, 00:25 #8

All this talk of booze has made me thirsty. Time for a wee bit o' scotch. Cheers!
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Girty
Journeyman Woodsrunner
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Joined: 11 Nov 2010, 09:54

02 Feb 2014, 10:02 #9

Small beer was a watered down version of full strength beer. Very low alcohol.
Decent full strength beer was a luxury.
Beers like Porter may have started off as a mixture of other beers (probably stale).
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Gonzales
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Joined: 28 Mar 2012, 15:49

02 Feb 2014, 17:59 #10

Cider was very popular with a quick search showing hard cider production in N.E. by the 1620's at least.

And you have to imagine that setting up a brewery was the first thing on any German immigrants thoughts upon arrival in the new world, God bless them.
"Yes, I probably will but such is Life's rich pagent."
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weaver47
Weaver
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Joined: 04 Jul 2012, 04:00

10 Feb 2014, 02:58 #11

Sorry to be off-topic, but isn't the "lady" on the floor in the foreground sporting a natty pair of knickers? I was under the impression that they went commando. ;)
I'm wondering if nettle beer or fruit wines were consumed. There was a thriving trade between England and France in wines and port and sherry I think.
You have to be warped to weave!
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RedWolf
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Joined: 25 Jul 2013, 06:54

10 Feb 2014, 03:31 #12

I would be under the impression that they were. I certainly would not look sidewise at someone for doing it.

I am reconsidering trying my hand at making stout.
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Le_Loup
Captain of Scouts
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Joined: 09 Nov 2010, 06:56

10 Feb 2014, 08:39 #13

weaver47 wrote:Sorry to be off-topic, but isn't the "lady" on the floor in the foreground sporting a natty pair of knickers? I was under the impression that they went commando. ;)
I'm wondering if nettle beer or fruit wines were consumed. There was a thriving trade between England and France in wines and port and sherry I think.
Yes, late 18th century, so I guess by this time they were wearing knickers.
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less traveled by,
and that has made all the difference.

Robert Frost.

Captain, Armidale NSW Australia chapter.
http://woodsrunnersdiary.blogspot.com.au/
http://australiansurvivalandpreppers.blogspot.com.au/
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHEOMS ... _as=public
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Yeoman
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Joined: 08 Sep 2012, 09:19

03 Mar 2014, 21:36 #14

There is an old trick used in Scotland when making whiskey, you distill it by boiling in a large pan with a bowl of cold water on top and another bowl floating on the surface of the brew. If the excise men come, chuck a baby in the bowl of water and claim it's bath time.

I thought small beer tended to be around 2%?
Ever yours,

Yeoman
"Forrard!"
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RedWolf
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Joined: 25 Jul 2013, 06:54

04 Mar 2014, 00:21 #15

HA!
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