Tony
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Dec 4 2011, 06:29 AM #73

Takashi @ Dec 4 2011, 02:03 AM wrote: uncia:

Google finds about 234,000 results for "great gross", about 1,110,000 results for "uncia".
How common is the word 'uncia'?
It's not very common at all. Other than on the internet, I don't think I've ever encountered anyone using it. I doubt more than a tiny minority realize (or care) it's the etymological origin of inch and ounce.
Numbers in my posts can be taken as dozenal, with the exception of italicized numbers which are decimal (unless otherwise specified).

Effective: 1E-08-11EX (23-08-2014)
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m1n1f1g
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Dec 4 2011, 09:10 AM #74

"uncia uncia" is the scientific name for the snow leopard, so that might add to the popularity. I have only heard of the word "uncia" on this board; it is certainly not a common word.
A few little conventions:
- Dozenal integers suffixed with prime (′). This is the uncial point.
- Decimal integers suffixed with middle dot (·). This is the decimal point.

You may see me use * prefix for messages before 11Ɛ7-03-1X, and a whole range of similar radix points. I will often use X and Ɛ for :A and :B.

Sometimes, I will imply that an integer is in dozenal, so I won't add any marks to it. You should be able to tell that "10 = 22 * 3" is in dozenal.
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dgoodmaniii
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Dec 4 2011, 01:27 PM #75

m1n1f1g @ Dec 4 2011, 09:10 AM wrote:"uncia uncia" is the scientific name for the snow leopard, so that might add to the popularity. I have only heard of the word "uncia" on this board; it is certainly not a common word.
I agree that "uncia" is quite rare, but "great gross" is rarer. I've at least used "uncia" when studying Latin; I'd never heard anyone use "great gross" until I became a dozenalist, and even dozenalists don't commonly use it.
All numbers in my posts are dozenal unless stated otherwise.
For ten, I use :A or X; for elv, I use :B or E. For the digital/fractional/radix point, I use the Humphrey point, ";".
TGM for the win!
Dozenal Adventures
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Kodegadulo
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Dec 4 2011, 04:07 PM #76

dgoodmaniii @ Dec 4 2011, 01:27 PM wrote:
m1n1f1g @ Dec 4 2011, 09:10 AM wrote:"uncia uncia" is the scientific name for the snow leopard, so that might add to the popularity. I have only heard of the word "uncia" on this board; it is certainly not a common word.
I agree that "uncia" is quite rare, but "great gross" is rarer. I've at least used "uncia" when studying Latin; I'd never heard anyone use "great gross" until I became a dozenalist, and even dozenalists don't commonly use it.
It's precisely because uncia is a Latin word, and not an English one, that it makes such a good dozenal-metric prefix, as the centerpiece of SDN. People have come to expect metric-like prefixes to be Greek or Latin based, given their experience with the SI prefixes.

But for a possible dozenal English 1000⁞, take a look at this discovery I just made. :)
As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
click on my user name and go to my "Website" link)
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Takashi
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Dec 10 2011, 02:39 AM #77

Thank you for all comments.

I want the candidate of prefix for 12-1 to meet the following conditions:

1. The initial character of the candidate is 'd'.
2. The meaning of the candidate has 12-ness.
3. The candidate is an English word derived from Latin.

uncia:
1. Initial 'u' is confused with 'µ'.
The abbreviation of 'pound' is 'lb' which is derived from Roman libra.
Generally, is the mismatch of the abbreviation and the spelling permitted?
2. OK.
3. 'uncia' seems to be a Latin word rather than an English word.

dozen:
1. OK.
2. OK.
3. 'dozen' is not a word derived from Latin.

I could not find any word which satisfies all conditions.
At the present I choose 'dozen' rather than 'uncia'.
Decimal figures are indicated by a period “.” as the radix point, and duodecimal figures are indicated by a semicolon“;” as the radix point. Both notations may use a comma “,” and “_” as the digit group separator. ‘X’ expresses ten, ‘E’ expresses eleven and ‘M’ expresses 1_0000,0000;(=12.^8). Octal figures are indicated by an at sign “@” as the radix point.
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Takashi
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Dec 10 2011, 03:15 AM #78

If the Newtonian constant of gravitation is according to [url=http://www.vmig-ip.com/Law_of_Gravitation_in_11_Dimensions.pdf]here[/url], the Planck force(F[sub]P[/sub]) and energy momentum tensor(T[sub]ik[/sub]) are as follows: where, μ is the proton and electron mass ratio 1.0626*12[sup]3[/sup]. See also [url=http://www.asahi-net.or.jp/~dd6t-sg/univunit-e/tables.pdf]here[/url] about the other constants. μ[sup]9[/sup]/α[sup]11[/sup] = 1.0011*12[sup]49[/sup] !! In the gravitic Universal Unit System, it means that is almost exactly 1/12. shows that the gravitic Universal Unit System approximates this ratio as 35.
Decimal figures are indicated by a period “.” as the radix point, and duodecimal figures are indicated by a semicolon“;” as the radix point. Both notations may use a comma “,” and “_” as the digit group separator. ‘X’ expresses ten, ‘E’ expresses eleven and ‘M’ expresses 1_0000,0000;(=12.^8). Octal figures are indicated by an at sign “@” as the radix point.
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icarus
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Dec 10 2011, 11:26 AM #79

Takashi @ Dec 10 2011, 02:39 AM wrote: 3. 'dozen' is not a word derived from Latin.

I could not find any word which satisfies all conditions.
At the present I choose 'dozen' rather than 'uncia'.
The word "dozen" comes to English from French "douzaine", which is derived from the French number "douze" = 12. This must be derived from the Latin "duodecim" = 12. So perhaps English "dozen" is indirectly Latin.
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Takashi
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Dec 10 2011, 11:46 AM #80

Thank you icarus.

After all 'dozen' is OK.
Decimal figures are indicated by a period “.” as the radix point, and duodecimal figures are indicated by a semicolon“;” as the radix point. Both notations may use a comma “,” and “_” as the digit group separator. ‘X’ expresses ten, ‘E’ expresses eleven and ‘M’ expresses 1_0000,0000;(=12.^8). Octal figures are indicated by an at sign “@” as the radix point.
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Takashi
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Dec 10 2011, 11:49 AM #81

I describe how to use symbols with the Universal Unit Systems. Whether context is decimal or duodecimal is indicated by radix point or unit kind. SI units are combined only with the decimal figures (indicated by a periodg.h as radix point), and units of the Universal Unit Systems are combined only with duodecimal figures (indicated by a semicolong;h as radix point). '.' and ',' exchange their roles each other in some countries. Therefore any digit group separator should not be used without radix point.
Decimal figures are indicated by a period “.” as the radix point, and duodecimal figures are indicated by a semicolon“;” as the radix point. Both notations may use a comma “,” and “_” as the digit group separator. ‘X’ expresses ten, ‘E’ expresses eleven and ‘M’ expresses 1_0000,0000;(=12.^8). Octal figures are indicated by an at sign “@” as the radix point.
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uaxuctum
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Dec 10 2011, 04:46 PM #82

Kodegadulo @ Nov 7 2011, 02:04 PM wrote:
Takashi @ Nov 7 2011, 12:22 PM wrote: Please click the table shown above.
When I click on it, my Webroot security software blocks it as a suspicious site. However, I just noticed the caption at the bottom of the image indicating that the "y" has a long /aɪ/ sound rather than a short /ɪ/ sound. This is odd, because if the myllion system is based on myriad /'mɪ.rɪ.əd/ the "y" in the latter has a short /ɪ/ sound.
That word myllion is a completely uninspired, laughable proposal. If it hadn't happened to have been uttered by a renowned IT scientist, I doubt anybody would have taken it seriously. Choosing a differently-spelled (*) but homophonous word in an attempt to differentiate meaning must be the pinnacle of absurdity (iff vs. if is another such absurdity). Trying to introduce a phonetic distinction after-the-fact where there was not meant to be one (and where it cannot be one in other languages without the "long I" vs. "short I" particularity of English) is a poor amendment of a poor idea.

Million is an augmentative (suffix -on(e)) derived from mille (Latin and Italian for "thousand"); i.e., it literally means "a big thousand", and this is plain obvious to speakers of Romance languages (though it seems not so much so to English-speakers like Mr. Knuth). The sane analogous derivative from myriad is something along the lines of myriadon or (simplified) myrion.


(As a side note, milliard is, of course, also a derivative from mille, in this case using a pejorative suffix -ard of Germanic origin, thus meaning something like "a d*mned [big] thousand". The analogous form from myriad would be myriadard or (simplified) myriard.)


(*) Differently spelled in some languages with an archaicizing, etymologizing spelling such as English. But such a fancy spelling is not readily transferrable into many others such as Spanish in which million and myllion are to be rendered exactly the same (millón) in both spelling and pronunciation.
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Kodegadulo
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Dec 10 2011, 05:08 PM #83

You might want to consider using SDN with UUS. It provides a set of dozenal metric prefixes firmly grounded on classical Greek and Latin roots and even features the Latin uncia, with its ancient meaning of "one twelfth", as a deliberate accident. ;) Although it has been presented as a substitute for Pendlebury's prefix system, for use with his TGM units, it's not at all limited to that; it is suitable for use with any metrological system.

By the way, SDN was designed to ensure all the prefixes are pronounced distinctly from each other and to be distinct from any previously-existing numeric combination forms.
As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
click on my user name and go to my "Website" link)
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Takashi
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Dec 10 2011, 11:55 PM #84

I think that the Universal Unit System is not my porposal but public proposal, and
the essential part of the system is not unit naming, number counting and prefix system but its unit quantities.

So, it is available that the Universal Unit System combines with another unit naming, number counting and prefix system,
such as SDN or Mr. Pendlebury's system.
Decimal figures are indicated by a period “.” as the radix point, and duodecimal figures are indicated by a semicolon“;” as the radix point. Both notations may use a comma “,” and “_” as the digit group separator. ‘X’ expresses ten, ‘E’ expresses eleven and ‘M’ expresses 1_0000,0000;(=12.^8). Octal figures are indicated by an at sign “@” as the radix point.
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Takashi
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Dec 10 2011, 11:57 PM #85

=Takashi @ Nov 27 2011, 06:24 AM wrote:1)
<snip>
- Relatively important concepts are discriminated from each other more finely and named more finely.
- Relatively non important concepts are discriminated from each other more coarsely and named more coarsely.

2)
In English common vocabulary, the words for positional representation of duodecimal numbering system
already exist:

dozen : 12
gross : 12^2
great gross : 12^3

and some dictionaries describe great gross as dozen gross.
<snip>
--------
The duodecimal myriad system is almost only numbering system
which is comprised of a simple rule to satisfy policies 1),
and which is connectable to system 2) at the lower limit.
How we do not change system is more important than how we change system.
- Strong limitation results unique solution
- Learn from the optimization of the present system
- Easy to be accepted

Better proposals are welcomed.
Decimal figures are indicated by a period “.” as the radix point, and duodecimal figures are indicated by a semicolon“;” as the radix point. Both notations may use a comma “,” and “_” as the digit group separator. ‘X’ expresses ten, ‘E’ expresses eleven and ‘M’ expresses 1_0000,0000;(=12.^8). Octal figures are indicated by an at sign “@” as the radix point.
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Takashi
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Dec 11 2011, 03:23 AM #86

A proposal such as follows is possible when we refer to the SDN.
(See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number_prefix . )

number counting:
124 - semillion
128 - unillion
1216 - dullion # Latin cardinal
1232 - terllion # Latin multiple
Because we have nothing to do with daily life upper 1015,
it will not be necessary to distinguish duodecimal context from decimal context after this.

prefix:
12-1 - uncia
12-2 - ducia
12-3 - tercia

There are three problems.
- 'uncia' is not popular.
- Initial letters are different from SI's.
- The correspondency between 121-123 and 12-1-12-3 fails.
Decimal figures are indicated by a period “.” as the radix point, and duodecimal figures are indicated by a semicolon“;” as the radix point. Both notations may use a comma “,” and “_” as the digit group separator. ‘X’ expresses ten, ‘E’ expresses eleven and ‘M’ expresses 1_0000,0000;(=12.^8). Octal figures are indicated by an at sign “@” as the radix point.
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Takashi
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Dec 18 2011, 06:38 AM #87

[quote="Kodegadulo @ Dec 10 2011, 05:08 PM"]it is suitable for use with any metrological system.[/quote] It is not suitable. For example, five hundred thousand meters and five handred kilometers are the same length. However, most people will choose the expression of five handred (500) kilometers. [quote="Takashi @ Sep 19 2011, 06:12 AM"](2) 12^4 is a upper limit as for the ratio of quantities that a human being can feel intuitionally. The human being can grasp numbers only countable in a work day or a night intuitively. (Example: step counts per day, number of sheep to count at a night) We cannot but grasp the further numbers logarithmically.[/quote] People choose a unit to become the range that they can express quantities with a recognizable number intuitively. We can express all distance on the earth with a recognizable number intuitively if we choose kilometer as a length unit. When the forms of prefixes are similar to cardinal numbers, we cannot make use of this advantage. [quote="Takashi @ Nov 27 2011, 06:24 AM"]1) - Relatively important concepts are discriminated from each other more finely and named more finely. - Relatively non important concepts are discriminated from each other more coarsely and named more coarsely.[/quote] The forms of important prefixes should be [b]totally[/b] different from cardinal numbers and each other. The current metric system uses the following terms: Terms in the upper rows are more important. In the same rows, more left-sided terms are more important. When we emphasize the words which have totally different forms each other, we can understand that the current metric system is optimized well.
Decimal figures are indicated by a period “.” as the radix point, and duodecimal figures are indicated by a semicolon“;” as the radix point. Both notations may use a comma “,” and “_” as the digit group separator. ‘X’ expresses ten, ‘E’ expresses eleven and ‘M’ expresses 1_0000,0000;(=12.^8). Octal figures are indicated by an at sign “@” as the radix point.
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Takashi
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Dec 18 2011, 08:55 AM #88

Google finds about 59,400,000 results for "myriad", about 47,300 results for "one myriad". It seems that "myriad" is not used for number counting in daily use. If this is true, we can indicate duodecimal context without omitting "one" by combining it with "myriad" (not "myriad[b]d[/b]"). There are fewer changes:
Decimal figures are indicated by a period “.” as the radix point, and duodecimal figures are indicated by a semicolon“;” as the radix point. Both notations may use a comma “,” and “_” as the digit group separator. ‘X’ expresses ten, ‘E’ expresses eleven and ‘M’ expresses 1_0000,0000;(=12.^8). Octal figures are indicated by an at sign “@” as the radix point.
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m1n1f1g
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Dec 18 2011, 11:00 AM #89

Takashi @ Dec 18 2011, 07:38 AM wrote:
Kodegadulo @ Dec 10 2011, 05:08 PM wrote:it is suitable for use with any metrological system.
It is not suitable.

For example, five hundred thousand meters and five handred kilometers are the same length.
However, most people will choose the expression of five handred 500 kilometers.
That's a different discussion, I would post it on something SDN-related. The SDN, as well as the myriad system, are as suitable for UUS as they are for TGM. If you believe that the SDN is unsuitable for the UUS, it is also unsuitable for TGM. Your criticism reflects this. I would write a counter-argument, but this is not the place for it.
A few little conventions:
- Dozenal integers suffixed with prime (&#8242;). This is the uncial point.
- Decimal integers suffixed with middle dot (·). This is the decimal point.

You may see me use * prefix for messages before 11&#400;7-03-1X, and a whole range of similar radix points. I will often use X and &#400; for :A and :B.

Sometimes, I will imply that an integer is in dozenal, so I won't add any marks to it. You should be able to tell that "10 = 22 * 3" is in dozenal.
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Takashi
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Dec 18 2011, 12:23 PM #90

m1n1f1g @ Dec 18 2011, 11:00 AM wrote:If you believe that the SDN is unsuitable for the UUS, it is also unsuitable for TGM. Your criticism reflects this. I would write a counter-argument, but this is not the place for it.
Yes. I think the SDN and the TGM prefix system are not suitable for the TGM unit system.
Please link the place if you write a counter-argument.
Decimal figures are indicated by a period “.” as the radix point, and duodecimal figures are indicated by a semicolon“;” as the radix point. Both notations may use a comma “,” and “_” as the digit group separator. ‘X’ expresses ten, ‘E’ expresses eleven and ‘M’ expresses 1_0000,0000;(=12.^8). Octal figures are indicated by an at sign “@” as the radix point.
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m1n1f1g
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Dec 18 2011, 05:00 PM #91

Probably, this is the best post on the topic, especially that last, wide table. In short, only a few cardinal numbers need to be the same as the prefixes, and the choice is based on digit grouping. Using a similar example to you, 500&#8242; 3mh (written in a UUS-meets-TGM style) would be said as "five gross harmonic triquametres". 5000&#8242; 3mh, on the other hand, would probably spill over to be "five harmonic hexuametres". Surely that's still satisfactory. Besides, it gives the sense of a "higher magnitude".

Well, it looks like I've written the argument here!
A few little conventions:
- Dozenal integers suffixed with prime (&#8242;). This is the uncial point.
- Decimal integers suffixed with middle dot (·). This is the decimal point.

You may see me use * prefix for messages before 11&#400;7-03-1X, and a whole range of similar radix points. I will often use X and &#400; for :A and :B.

Sometimes, I will imply that an integer is in dozenal, so I won't add any marks to it. You should be able to tell that "10 = 22 * 3" is in dozenal.
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dgoodmaniii
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Dec 18 2011, 07:48 PM #92

Takashi @ Dec 18 2011, 08:55 AM wrote: Google finds about 59,400,000 results for "myriad", about 47,300 results for "one myriad".
It seems that "myriad" is not used for number counting in daily use.
In my experience, people don't think of a "myriad" as meaning a particular number. It's a bit like "zillion" in that it's used to mean "I'm not really sure precisely how many, but it's a whole lot." I think it would be quite difficult to get people accustomed to using "myriad" to mean a particular number instead of "tons and tons."
All numbers in my posts are dozenal unless stated otherwise.
For ten, I use :A or X; for elv, I use :B or E. For the digital/fractional/radix point, I use the Humphrey point, ";".
TGM for the win!
Dozenal Adventures
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Kodegadulo
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Dec 18 2011, 07:58 PM #93

[quote="Takashi @ Dec 18 2011, 06:38 AM"]The forms of important prefixes should be [b]totally[/b] different from cardinal numbers and each other.[/quote] This may be a rule you have specified for your UUS system, and it may be [i]convenient[/i] if this condition were met within a given native language, but I dispute that this is any sort of universal requirement that [i]must[/i] apply to [i]all[/i] usages of metric-style systems in [i]all[/i] human languages. [quote]The current metric system uses the following terms: Terms in the upper rows are more important. In the same rows, more left-sided terms are more important. When we emphasize the words which have totally different forms each other, we can understand that the current metric system is optimized well.[/quote] You incorrectly describe [b]micro[/b] and [b]nano[/b] as being of Latin origin. They actually come from Greek. The Greek word [i]μικρός[/i] ([i]micrós[/i]) means "small"; [i]νάνος[/i] ([i]nános[/i]) means "dwarf". More importantly, and with all due respect, this whole table exhibits a curious and unnecessary Anglo-centrism. This is odd coming from someone whose first language is not English. I can cite at least one language, in current use, in which the SI/metric prefixes (or rather, their translations) [i]violate[/i] this rule of yours. That language is, in fact, Modern Greek: Except for minor differences in declension, native Greek and Greek metric use [i]precisely the same words[/i]. So what makes this rule so important?
As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
click on my user name and go to my "Website" link)
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dgoodmaniii
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Dec 18 2011, 07:58 PM #94

m1n1f1g @ Dec 18 2011, 05:00 PM wrote: Well, it looks like I've written the argument here!
Despite all the hoopla with people saying, "Metric is easier; just move the decimal point!", I don't think most people really understand exponents. That's why we see things like "0.053 kilometers" on science shows; because they were using kilometers before so they use them again, even though "53 meters" is a much easier thing to say there, and doesn't confuse the issue at all. (I've noticed this happen even when they're not trying to compare scales with something in kilometers, when it's even less justifiable.) That's also why certain SI prefixes, like "hecta" and "deka," or even "deci," are practically never used, even though sometimes they're almost certainly the best choice (human height, for example, should be given in decimeters; but for some reason it's always given in centimeters): because while people understand it when they sit down and think about it, they don't really intuitively grasp the concept of exponentiation, or how to manipulate exponents.

Having a consistent set of exponential prefixes, like SDN or Pendlebury, will make it much easier for people to internalize exponentiation. Having done this, fiddling with exponents won't be the exclusive domain of geeks and mathematicians (am I redundant?) anymore; it will be something that people do as it's convenient. This is another benefit that SDN would produce.
All numbers in my posts are dozenal unless stated otherwise.
For ten, I use :A or X; for elv, I use :B or E. For the digital/fractional/radix point, I use the Humphrey point, ";".
TGM for the win!
Dozenal Adventures
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Kodegadulo
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Dec 19 2011, 08:53 PM #95

Takashi @ Dec 10 2011, 02:39 AM wrote:I want the candidate of prefix for 12-1 to meet the following conditions:

1. The initial character of the candidate is 'd'.
2. The meaning of the candidate has 12-ness.
3. The candidate is an English word derived from Latin.
The only condition that I see as necessary is 2. I see no rational purpose in conditions 1 and 3.

Condition 1 is a crippling restriction that eliminates 25· out of 26· letters in the English language. Why do you require that? Wouldn't it be better to use any letter other than "d" so that the dozenal-metric prefix for 12·-1 is distinguished from 10·-1 (deci-)? Wouldn't that avoid confusion?

Condition 3 seems like an oxymoron to me: Isn't the whole point that converting to the dozenal system requires us to invent new words that do not already exist in English? Doesn't the "myriad/myllion" system invent an entire bestiary of new words that did not already exist in English?
I could not find any word which satisfies all conditions.
Of course not! Why would you expect to?

Since we need to enhance English anyway, what is wrong with borrowing words such as "uncia" from Latin? Why do you require an "English word derived from Latin"? That description implies that sometime in the past a Latin word was incorporated into English and became accepted as an English word. But again, the whole point is we don't already have enough such words to express dozenal numbers. So why do you think it unsuitable to use exactly the same mechanism today, to do a fresh borrowing from Latin and accept a new word into English?

And why only Latin? Wouldn't Greek borrowings be acceptable as well?
uncia:
1. Initial 'u' is confused with 'µ'.
So what? It is not necessary to use "u" as a metric-like prefix abbreviation for "uncia-". Pendlebury's system of numeric subscripts/superscripts is adequate: harmonic unciameter = 1mh. unciaGrafut = 1Gf.

Besides, nobody should be using "u" as an abbreviation for "micro-" anyway. With today's fonts, it should be easy enough to write an actual Greek mu "µ" -- as you yourself did! -- or use the alternative "mc" (e.g. microgram = mcg).
At the present I choose 'dozen' rather than 'uncia'.
But "dozen" does not mean 12·-1, it means 12·1. I suppose you must mean "one dozenth". But how would we use that as a metric-like prefix? Would 1mh be a "harmonic dozenth-meter"?
As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
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dgoodmaniii
Dozens Demigod
dgoodmaniii
Dozens Demigod
Joined: May 21 2009, 01:45 PM

Dec 19 2011, 09:58 PM #96

Kodegadulo @ Dec 19 2011, 08:53 PM wrote:1. Initial 'u' is confused with 'µ'.
So what? It is not necessary to use "u" as a metric-like prefix abbreviation for "uncia-". Pendlebury's system of numeric subscripts/superscripts is adequate: harmonic unciameter = 1mh. unciaGrafut = 1Gf.
I agree with most of your posting, but I did pause a bit at this. Using "u" for "µ" is a pretty common practice whenever we're limited by seven-bit characters, which is actually still surprisingly often. I know tgmconv using "u" as the abbreviation for "micro-," and I think it's a legitimate way to keep it monoliteral (one-lettered; that's a word I just made up, out of mixed Latin-Greek borrowings!) while still differentiated from "milli."

I don't think that creates any confusion, though; the "u" would only mean "micro" when attached to metric units, not when attached to the units of a dozenal system, where "micro" (decimal 10-6) is meaningful but frightfully inconvenient. So while I agree with you that the confusion between "u" and "µ" should not be a concern, I disagree that "u" isn't a perfectly fine substitute for "µ" when the occasion calls for it.

That is, though, the problem with alphabetic prefixes for what's essentially a numeric issue, as you also pointed out: it's introducing a new complication where none is necessary. Why do we need "milli-" and friends when we're doing mathematics and not talking about it? What's wrong with just using the exponent, which is what we're talking about anyway, and which bears no potential for ambiguity? The raised and lowered exponents aren't just adequate; they're far superior.
All numbers in my posts are dozenal unless stated otherwise.
For ten, I use :A or X; for elv, I use :B or E. For the digital/fractional/radix point, I use the Humphrey point, ";".
TGM for the win!
Dozenal Adventures
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