Lettoun's Metrology

lettoun
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lettoun
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Aug 29 2018, 10:54 PM #1

The short, short version:

This dozenal metrology has been called both TADLE and Lettoun's, and neither seem great as names.

I see the primary quality of the day as its oscillation between light/warmth and dark/cold. Therefore, I divide the day into these qualitatively distinct halves.
Before my conversation with Kode, this half-day and its divisions were named sweep-hour-caddat-lozil-tick-blink-jiffy (caddat and lozil borrowed from Arabic); they are now [unnamed]-hour-caddat-sweep-tick-blink. Note, the tick is as long as z10 Tims.
Fun calendar things happen at higher scales.

After waffling, I decided on a unit of length based upon the (rough) z110:X ratio of the speed of light and the authalic circumference of Earth, naming it the "ame" after a dubious mention of an ancient Egyptian unit of measure on Wikipedia of comparable size (the width of six fingers). The ame is defined such that = z11,0000,0000 amem per tick, which among other things makes the authalic circumference z9EE9,4085.5 amem.

The unit of mass is the binilqua-dalton, named the "dalliot" from 'dalton' and SI's 'yotta'.

The unit of charge is the unnilqua-electron, named the "electonne".

The magnitude of the unit of temperature is (z82444)/(d27316) times a Kelvin (=d4.321135...=z4.3X2E07...); that is, the triple point of water d273.16 K is by definition z824.44 |L|. 
The civil, crystallic scale sets 0°L (Leptigrade, from greek lepto-) at the triple point, not the freezing point of water. This makes the boiling point of water (~d99.98 °C) almost z300 °L, etc.

I've kludged a copy of the DGW spreadsheet to display all the coherent units. Temperature is ever so slightly off, likely because of the triple point, but it's basically right. There could be other errors.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/ ... sp=sharing

What do you think?
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Kodegadulo
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Kodegadulo
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Aug 30 2018, 12:00 AM #2

lettoun wrote:... an ancient Egyptian unit of measure on Wikipedia of comparable size (the width of six fingers) ...

This must be the following table entry (paraphrased) from Ancient Egyptian units of measurement:

English
Name
Egyptian
Name
Egyptian
Name
Coptic
Name
Coptic
Name
Palms Digits Metric
Fist ḫfꜥ
ꜣmm
ϭⲁϫⲙⲏ
ϫⲁⲙⲏ
qajmē
jamē
6 11.25d cm

What an amazing coincidence! I recently came up with a way of finger-counting the dozenal digits using one hand, where a laterally-pointing fist represents the number 6!  I had no idea that the ancient Egyptians also equated a fist to six fingers!

As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
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Kodegadulo
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Aug 30 2018, 01:24 AM #3

In your copy of the spreadsheet, you've picked Unicode Character 'PLUTO' (U+2647) "♇" as your brand mark.  I can see why: The combination L and P could stand for "Lettoun Patterson".   So why not embrace the coincidence, and call it the "Pluto" metrology? (I only mean this half-seriously.)
As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
click on my user name and go to my "Website" link)
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lettoun
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lettoun
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Aug 30 2018, 01:36 AM #4

Actually, that's not the reason why I picked it. A further coincidence!
At least the brand mark is easy to choose. I've already renamed it twice this week.
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Kodegadulo
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Aug 30 2018, 02:11 AM #5

lettoun wrote:I see the primary quality of the day as its oscillation between light/warmth and dark/cold. Therefore, I divide the day into these qualitatively distinct halves.
Which are only equal halves on two days out of the year, namely the equinoxes. Every other day either the light/warmth (daylight) or dark/cold (nighttime) is longer, depending on your latitude. Whereas over the entire year, the total length of the solar day stays exactly the same. (Well, almost. See analemma.)

Before my conversation with Kode, this half-day and its divisions were named sweep-hour-caddat-lozil-tick-blink-jiffy (caddat and lozil borrowed from Arabic); they are now [unnamed]-hour-caddat-sweep-tick-blink. Note, the tick is as long as z10 Tims.
Just for comparison:

Lettoun's

TGM
Equivalent

Primel
Equivalent
(Colloquial)
🌐
Metric
Equivalent
♇sweep
?
pentqua·Tim ⚀clock = ½⚀day 21,000z sec
♇hour quadqua·Tim ⚀hour = ½⚀dwell 2100z sec
♇caddat triqua·Tim ⚀break = ½⚀breather 210z sec
♇lozil
♇sweep
biqua·Tim ⚀lapse
⚀sweep = ½⚀trice
21z sec
♇tick unqua·Tim ⚀pause = ½⚀lull 2.1z sec
♇blink Tim ⚀tick
⚀blink = ½⚀twinkling
0.21z sec
♇jiffy uncia·Tim ? = ½⚀jiff = ½⚀vibe(?) 0.021z sec
(deprecated names indicated with strikethrough)

But Lettoun's choice for his ♇timel (the coherent time unit of the ♇ metrology) is the ♇tick = unqua·Tim, rather than the ♇blink = Tim.

I'm not sure what colloquial name to use for Lettoun's ♇jiffy on the Periodic Table. A ♇jiffy and a ⚀jiff can certainly coexist, even with different values (the former half the latter), so long as we distinguish them by brand. But qualified overloading like that is always awkward, and I am trying to avoid that for the purposes of the Periodic Table.  I've now reasoned myself out of using "jiff" or "jiffy" for any unit that is any dozenal-regular fraction of the day, because none really approximate the mainstream values for "jiffy" close enough.
As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
click on my user name and go to my "Website" link)
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lettoun
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lettoun
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Sep 5 2018, 04:17 AM #6

As I see it, it's not so much that any one sunning is the same length as the following night, but rather that the total durations of sunnings and nights at any latitude are, as a whole, balanced. If they changed proportions on a long-term scale, there might be a problem. Of course, people living near the equator have no such variety issues, and Antarctic researchers have their own peculiarities. There are a lot of things to keep track of, and if I don't need to track every one precisely, I won't. You average your minuscule variation, I'll average my variably larger one.


On a somewhat related note, I'm considering calling a quadqua-tick "arc", as most of the idea is that the sun (and, to a lesser extent, the moon) will arc across the sky over the duration of one arc. {And would that make a tick a second of arc?}
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Kodegadulo
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Sep 5 2018, 01:57 PM #7

lettoun wrote:On a somewhat related note, I'm considering calling a quadqua-tick "arc", as most of the idea is that the sun (and, to a lesser extent, the moon) will arc across the sky over the duration of one arc.
So you're suggesting that "arc" could make a good colloquial for the semi•day (= ⚀clock = ⚀quadqua•pause)? Hmmm. It might make a more apt colloquialism for the semi•circle or straightangle (what Pendlebury called a "Pi"). That is, as a unit of arc (angle,  rotation) rather than a unit of time. Don might be keen on that. Except that "arc" is a rather generic term, not specific to the straightangle.

Besides, the sun "arcs across the sky" over the course of a day, not a semi•day. It's just that for part of this time, it's eclipsed by the bulk of the Earth beneath your feet. The "sky" is a sphere around us. The parts over the antipodes from you do not cease to exist just because you can't see them. A polar-mounted telescope will dutifully continue tracking the position of the sun even at night, pointing generally into the ground, until it catches the sun again at sunrise.
{And would that make a tick a second of arc?}
Only if this forum were called "GrossesOnline", and we were discussing "grossenalism", such that a ⚀pause might be considered a second "grossenal" division of a ⚀clock. And if we were going for bad puns. 😉

But of course that would mean that the first "grossenal" division of the ⚀clock would be the ⚀break. And neither the ⚀hour nor the ⚀sweep would be a "thing". Which seems counter-productive.
Last edited by Kodegadulo on Sep 5 2018, 05:35 PM, edited 4 times in total.
As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
click on my user name and go to my "Website" link)
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Kodegadulo
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Sep 5 2018, 04:26 PM #8

lettoun wrote: As I see it, it's not so much that any one sunning is the same length as the following night, but rather that the total durations of sunnings and nights at any latitude are, as a whole, balanced. If they changed proportions on a long-term scale, there might be a problem. Of course, people living near the equator have no such variety issues, and Antarctic researchers have their own peculiarities. There are a lot of things to keep track of, and if I don't need to track every one precisely, I won't. You average your minuscule variation, I'll average my variably larger one.
Oh, I think it's perfectly reasonable to posit that what you are counting are average solar semi•days. Or average solar clock•periods. The difference is that I favor just counting average solar days, pure and simple. What you are struggling with is the fact that we have a simple cyclic period with a simple name: "day". But you wish to pretend that a derivative of this, a half-day, is somehow more basic. In reality a half•day does not constitute a natural cycle, but only half of one. No matter how you slice the day in half, the halves have different characteristics, and don't form a natural cycle by themselves until you stitch them together again. If you divide the day at average sunrise and average sunset, you get daylight ("Lux") vs nighttime ("Nox"). If you divide at noon and midnight you get Ante and Post Meridiem (Before and After Mid-day), the former of which starts dark but ends bright, the latter the reverse. Although we thus have names for the alternating instances of half-days, a pithy name for the half-day itself, independent of the term "day", remains elusive, belying the notion that it is other than a derivative concept. The best we can do is "clock-period", but this depends on something artificial, the cultural accident of the half-day clock, not something natural. The ulterior motive, of course, is to make the customary hour a simple dozenal power of the "primary" unit, but the hour is no less a historical artifact than the semi•day.

Even during an Arctic (or Antarctic) summer, when the sun remains visible above the horizon for months, it still can be observed to make a complete circuit around the sky once every ... day. 🙂 At such a season, the points along that circuit that might be considered "noon" or "midnight", or any other time of day, are somewhat arbitrary and problematic. But the full cycle itself is still self-evident. Even during the dark polar winters we still know exactly where the sun is, and can keep track of the solar cycle, even if sidereal time would be more directly evident. We can calculate the sun's position by dead reckoning, but even without that, we can deduce it by observing the phases of the moon.
As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
click on my user name and go to my "Website" link)
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lettoun
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lettoun
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Sep 13 2018, 12:18 AM #9

Object permanence? That's no fun.
Still, I'll agree arc isn't going to fit the bill.

I know full well that the day is the natural cycle– I'll not hide the stitches on my Creature. I've heard tau/pi discussions here that, well, seem to go in circles. I don't really have strong opinions on that. The thing I think is importantly different about discussions of the day is that, effectively, the Earth is not punctual, and different places on the Earth have different circumstances, and so to each observer, which direction is 0 rad is nontrivial. A circle is a circle no matter how you turn it, but the Earth has a direction that's important. (And if the hour is my ulterior motive, it's subconscious.)

The day is indeed the True Cycle– but its properties don't only lend it to strict dozenal division. To compare, we often like to think of seasons in a year. I similarly say that, yes, the year is the True Cycle, but apart from absolute timekeeping, we primarily care because it is one True Cycle through the many seasons. (Whether there's 2, 4, or 6 isn't terribly important.)

For both cases, subdivisions of the whole cycle are important because, unlike angle, where being spun around until dizziness in a featureless void could give any endpoint without one knowing, a Rip van Winkle would likely know it to be a crisp autumn morning. 
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