Lettoun's Aforementioned Fun Calendar Things

lettoun
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lettoun
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Joined: Aug 28 2018, 09:11 PM

Sep 5 2018, 02:52 AM #1

Hopefully I can keep this brief too.

My metrology measures half days, so that makes it straightforward(?) to track position in the week in base d14.
#0 starts at Sunday, 6PM; the weekday days are 1, 3, 5, 7, 9; evenings are even; and because 'clock E ends at Saturday, 6PM, as said, two more digits are added between.
Expunge the problem of leap years by expunging years altogether, and just count the number of weeks.
To maintain seasonal grounding in this off-kilter system, track the moon independently, counting moons up from January to Levember and resetting using the winter solstice. Abbreviate them, respectively, JFRP MNLG SOVDE. Also record the moon phase as waxing (x), full (f), waning (n), or new (o). 
Strung together, that's 
4EE4XOo48700 
for Wednesday September 5th d2018, d2:35 AM GMT, the tenth new moon of the year.
And before you ask, yes, that week number is intentionally slightly smaller than expected. Our Current Epoch, Jan. 1, 1, is a Saturday. If I could just as rationally choose the week one day after OCE as I could the week containing it, I might as well choose something different.


What do you think?
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Kodegadulo
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Kodegadulo
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Joined: Sep 10 2011, 11:27 PM

Sep 5 2018, 11:08 AM #2

lettoun wrote:Hopefully I can keep this brief too.
But it's worth an interesting discussion (or discussions), and that could get lengthy. 🙂
My metrology measures half days, so that makes it straightforward(?) to track position in the week in base d14.
People give pithy names to things that come natural to them, and give derivative names to things that are more artificial.  The day is clearly an important period for human beings, and "day" is as pithy as it comes.  Despite the fact that clocks with periods of a half-day have existed in our culture for centuries, there has been absolutely no trend to give that period a less-derivative name than "half-day". (It's only been here that we've suggested a colloquial of "clock", and even that's a bit contrived.) Instead, people have just accepted the notion that a "day" is "twenty-four hours".  One awkward non-decimal factor (24d) is as good as another (12d) in a decimal world.
#0 starts at Sunday, 6PM; the weekday days are 1, 3, 5, 7, 9; evenings are even; and because 'clock E ends at Saturday, 6PM, as said, two more digits are added between.
It seems you are using the DSA convention of X=10d, E=11d as dozenal transdecimals, but leaving it entirely up in the air what to use for 12d and 13d in base 14d.  I suppose scheduling on Sundays is not as critical to you as during the work week, but if you are going to propose a civilizational dating scheme, realize that even church services and NFL football games have schedules. 🙂  Not to mention people who need to work on Sundays if we expect to hit the mall. You really ought to flesh this out.  I would suggest the "Computerese" convention of A=10d, B=11d, C=12d, D=13d, with E=14d as a symbol for the base itself (useful as a subscript where feasible). But then to be consistent that would imply using A=10d, B=11d as your transdecimals for base C=12d as well. Perhaps not what you were looking for.
Expunge the problem of leap years by expunging years altogether, and just count the number of weeks.
That is going to be a very hard sell, I think.  For better or worse, years are pretty important to people. They are a "thing" with a pithy name: "year".  While there have been calendar systems based on counting days (see Julian dating), such systems have only a niche market (among astronomers), and to my knowledge there has never been one based on an extended count of weeks.
To maintain seasonal grounding in this off-kilter system, track the moon independently, counting moons up from January to Levember and resetting using the winter solstice. Abbreviate them, respectively, JFRP MNLG SOVDE. Also record the moon phase as waxing (x), full (f), waning (n), or new (o).
You've gone to all the trouble of expunging years from your calendar, in favor of weeks, yet you feel the need to keep a "seasonal grounding"?  This seems inconsistent.  Seasons imply years, because they are discrete divisions of a year. For that matter, "months" are also discrete divisions of a year, unless we're talking about a true lunar calendar, which tracks actual orbits of the Moon. But it doesn't seem that you're proposing an actual lunar calendar, because of this "winter solstice reset". It seems like your "months" are going to be starting at arbitrary moon phases from year to year. And a lunar orbit isn't even a round number of days, so your "months" would need to be variable length.

You seem to have abbreviated the months thus: January, February, MaRch, APril, May, JuNe, JuLy, AuGust, September, October, NoVember, December, LEvember. Getting these down to one character is such a losing battle, I'm not sure why you didn't opt for a numeric solution instead. Computerese might have sufficed: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, A, B, C, D.

Note that "Levember" has been suggested here in the past as part of a solution for the current misnumbering of the months at the end of the year, which originally weren't at the end:

Seventh month: September => Ninth month: Ennember
Eighth month: October => Tenth month: Dectober
Ninth month: November => Eleventh month: Levember
Tenth month: December => Twelfth month: Dozember

You seem to have co-opted "Levember" as the name for an (optional?) thirtheenth month, thus extending the misnomers rather than solving them.  I think instead of this, a little creativity here would be welcome.  (Perhaps "Yondember", for one beyond the nominal dozen?)

As for moon phases, there are Unicode characters specifically for those:
🌑 = new moon
🌒 = waxing crescent
🌓 = first quarter
🌔 = waxing gibbous
🌕 = full moon
🌖 = waning gibbous
🌗 = last quarter
🌘 = waning crescent
Strung together, that's
4EE4XOo48700
for Wednesday September 5th d2018, d2:35 AM GMT, the tenth new moon of the year.
And before you ask, yes, that week number is intentionally slightly smaller than expected. Our Current Epoch, Jan. 1, 1, is a Saturday. If I could just as rationally choose the week one day after OCE as I could the week containing it, I might as well choose something different.
Note that Jan 1, 1 CE is a Saturday on the proleptic Julian calendar. On the proleptic Gregorian calendar, it would be a Monday.  Looks like you've chosen your epoch to be about 33d=29z CE. Around about the projected date of a certain crucifixion. Note that we have no definitive historical date for that, nor even for the supposed birthdate of that person. Even the gospel accounts regarding this person's birth conflict with each other by as much as ten years.  So you've picked what is really an arbitrary epoch. No more arbitrary than any other, true, but then, not really compelling enough for people to drop the epoch they are already using.
What do you think?
I dunno. Seems like you've gone to a lot of trouble, but for unclear reasons, and without achieving any clear advantages to compensate for the extra complexity.
As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
click on my user name and go to my "Website" link)
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Paul Rapoport
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Paul Rapoport
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Joined: Dec 26 2012, 01:59 AM

Sep 5 2018, 08:14 PM #3

An epoch based on something that is significant to much less than the whole planet is open to question. The best basis I know of that affected the whole planet was determined by Sunny some time ago, the perihelion on the Northern Hemisphere summer in 9564 BCE, at about the beginning of the Holocene Epoch.That's what I've been using in my calendar for a few years now.

I'm unclear on what the moon has to do with the seasons. Integrating lunar and solar calendars is rather elusive AFAIK.
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Kodegadulo
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Kodegadulo
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Joined: Sep 10 2011, 11:27 PM

Sep 6 2018, 01:50 AM #4

lettoun wrote:My metrology measures half days, so that makes it straightforward(?) to track position in the week in base d14.
[z] All numbers dozenal

Honestly, rather than twist their heads around zeffal (= base sepbin = unbinal = tetradecimal = base twenzeen = base fourteen) counts of half-days, I think most people would find it much easier to think in terms of whole days-of-the-week, augmented by some indicator of the semi·day in the day, and presumably followed by the hours and fractional hours (breaks, sweeps, pauses, blinks) in the semi·day.

For instance, here's an example that would break down the days of the week Abrahamic-religion style (evening followed by morning):

1N = Sunday Nox = Saturday Evening + Sunday Overnight = 1N0.0000 to 1NƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
1L = Sunday Lux = Sunday Morning + Sunday Afternoon = 1L0.0000 to 1LƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
2N = Monday Nox = Sunday Evening + Monday Overnight = 2N0.0000 to 2NƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
2L = Monday Lux = Monday Morning + Monday Afternoon = 2L0.0000 to 2LƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
3N = Tuesday Nox = Monday Evening + Tuesday Overnight = 3N0.0000 to 3NƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
3L = Tuesday Lux = Tuesday Morning + Tuesday Afternoon = 3L0.0000 to 3LƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
4N = Wednesday Nox = Tuesday Evening + Wednesday Overnight = 4N0.0000 to 4NƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
4L = Wednesday Lux = Wednesday Morning + Wednesday Afternoon = 4L0.0000 to 4LƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
5N = Thursday Nox = Wednesday Evening + Thursday Overnight = 5N0.0000 to 5NƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
5L = Thursday Lux = Thursday Morning + Thursday Afternoon = 5L0.0000 to 5LƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
6N = Friday Nox = Thursday Evening + Friday Overnight = 6N0.0000 to 6NƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
6L = Friday Lux = Friday Morning + Friday Afternoon = 6L0.0000 to 6LƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
7N = Saturday Nox = Friday Evening + Saturday Overnight = 6N0.0000 to 6NƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
7L = Saturday Lux = Saturday Morning + Saturday Afternoon = 6L0.0000 to 6LƐ.ƐƐƐƐ

And here's one that would break down the days of the week Western AM/PM style:

1A = Sunday Ante Meridiem = Sunday Overnight + Sunday Morning = 1A0.0000 to 1AƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
1P = Sunday Post Meridiem = Sunday Afternoon + Sunday Evening = 1P0.0000 to 1PƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
2A = Monday Ante Meridiem = Monday Overnight + Monday Morning = 2A0.0000 to 2AƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
2P = Monday Post Meridiem = Monday Afternoon + Monday Evening = 2P0.0000 to 2PƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
3A = Tuesday Ante Meridiem = Tuesday Overnight + Tuesday Morning = 3A0.0000 to 3AƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
3P = Tuesday Post Meridiem = Tuesday Afternoon + Tuesday Evening = 3P0.0000 to 3PƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
4A = Wednesday Ante Meridiem = Wednesday Overnight + Wednesday Morning = 4A0.0000 to 4AƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
4P = Wednesday Post Meridiem = Wednesday Afternoon + Wednesday Evening = 4P0.0000 to 4PƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
5A = Thursday Ante Meridiem = Thursday Overnight + Thursday Morning = 5A0.0000 to 5AƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
5P = Thursday Post Meridiem = Thursday Afternoon + Thursday Evening = 5P0.0000 to 5PƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
6A = Friday Ante Meridiem = Friday Overnight + Friday Morning = 6A0.0000 to 6AƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
6P = Friday Post Meridiem = Friday Afternoon + Friday Evening = 6P0.0000 to 6PƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
7A = Saturday Ante Meridiem = Saturday Overnight + Saturday Morning = 7A0.0000 to 7AƐ.ƐƐƐƐ
7P = Saturday Post Meridiem = Saturday Afternoon + Saturday Evening = 7P0.0000 to 7PƐ.ƐƐƐƐ

Of course, my own actual preference would be to just break down the week into elapsed days and fractional days (dwells, breathers, trices, lulls, twinklings), with the day-of-the-week expressed as the modulo by 7:

0 = Sunday = 0.00000 to 0.ƐƐƐƐƐ
1 = Monday = 1.00000 to 1.ƐƐƐƐƐ
2 = Tuesday = 2.00000 to 2.ƐƐƐƐƐ
3 = Wednesday = 3.00000 to 3.ƐƐƐƐƐ
4 = Thursday = 4.00000 to 4.ƐƐƐƐƐ
5 = Friday = 5.00000 to 5.ƐƐƐƐƐ
6 = Saturday = 6.00000 to 6.ƐƐƐƐƐ

And then I'd simply make it common knowledge that a Western-style structure for the day would have:

.00000 to .2ƐƐƐƐ = Overnight Phase = Nox Ante Meridiem
.30000 to .5ƐƐƐƐ = Morning Phase = Lux Ante Meridiem
.60000 to .8ƐƐƐƐ = Afternoon Phase = Lux Post Meridiem
.90000 to .ƐƐƐƐƐ = Evening Phase = Nox Post Meridiem

and an Abrahamic-religion-style structure for the day would have:

.00000 to .2ƐƐƐƐ = Evening Phase = Nox Post Meridiem
.30000 to .5ƐƐƐƐ = Overnight Phase = Nox Ante Meridiem
.60000 to .8ƐƐƐƐ = Morning Phase = Lux Ante Meridiem
.90000 to .ƐƐƐƐƐ = Afternoon Phase = Lux Post Meridiem


Either way, much simpler, much more concise, yet conveys all the same information.
As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
click on my user name and go to my "Website" link)
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lettoun
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lettoun
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Joined: Aug 28 2018, 09:11 PM

Sep 13 2018, 01:22 AM #5

Well, in Lettoun's Super Pollyanna Dream Future World, digits would look a little something like this:
digit.png
But of course extra digits are a never-settled debate.
to my knowledge there has never been one based on an extended count of weeks.
There's a first time for everything!
 seasonal grounding / moon seasons
(Im)precision is my point here. I really don't want to have to keep track of leap years and calendar drift, but some sort of vague seasonal notion is both fine and wanted. 
Perpendicularity is my other point. To say "4EE4XOo48700" is as valid as "4EE4X•48700". Both unambiguously refer to the same instant. So long as the semi-accurate season tracker is totally unrelated to the timestamp, it might as well use something like the moon. As far as I've used it, I only associate one stamp per week: if the new moon is Sunday noon, the entire prior week is Foo new. By 'reset', I just mean 'is there a leap month this year or not?' Currently, months always start on (the Sunnight of the week containing) the new moon. The months are variable length! The years are variable length! It's (well, arguably) not important, because they aren't necessary to the timestamp. 

Integrating lunar and solar calendars is rather elusive AFAIK.

There's a first second time for everything!
Yondember
Fine by me. I didn't really feel like also renaming months.
Unicode
 Just because it's possible doesn't mean it's easy. If I want to date notes, should I draw a picture of the moon? Should Grandma Jones or Fort Nowhere be forced out of their admittedly antiquated ways needlessly? (I know, what a fine forum to say that in.) And it'd be a copy-paste or a five-or-six key command as opposed to a single keypress. "Seems trouble unclear complexity".
proleptic Gregorian Monday
That's... actually pretty great. While I have brash confidence that I've chosen the correct date, epochs, like month naming, are not among my top interests. Though that will mean I'll have missed my personal Y2K (W5U?), once in April d2020, moved to d1988 or so.

1N =Sunday Nox
What is this, Lua?
0 =Sunday
That's better. 
I am somewhat desperately trying to cram in as much information into as small a space as I can, whether or not it's advisable. (I wonder if it really is a good trade to underload a digit to 7 days instead of overload to z12 half days?) Though it is as concise for information: z12*10*10*10*10 for ticks opposed to z7*10*10*10*10 for lulls.  [Excellent... I've started a Primel-compatible weeks system...] I'm well used to my system by now, it seems as simple to me.
Still, to change to whole days would change not just my calendar but my metrology–I'd rather be convinced to change my metrology and make my calendar match than vice-versa.
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Kodegadulo
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Kodegadulo
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Joined: Sep 10 2011, 11:27 PM

Sep 14 2018, 02:35 AM #6

lettoun wrote:(Im)precision is my point here. I really don't want to have to keep track of leap years and calendar drift, but some sort of vague seasonal notion is both fine and wanted. 
Perpendicularity is my other point. To say "4EE4XOo48700" is as valid as "4EE4X•48700". Both unambiguously refer to the same instant. So long as the semi-accurate season tracker is totally unrelated to the timestamp, it might as well use something like the moon. As far as I've used it, I only associate one stamp per week: if the new moon is Sunday noon, the entire prior week is Foo new. By 'reset', I just mean 'is there a leap month this year or not?' Currently, months always start on (the Sunnight of the week containing) the new moon. The months are variable length! The years are variable length! It's (well, arguably) not important, because they aren't necessary to the timestamp. 
...
Unicode
 Just because it's possible doesn't mean it's easy. If I want to date notes, should I draw a picture of the moon? Should Grandma Jones or Fort Nowhere be forced out of their admittedly antiquated ways needlessly? (I know, what a fine forum to say that in.) And it'd be a copy-paste or a five-or-six key command as opposed to a single keypress. "Seems trouble unclear complexity".
So let's see, you think cutting-and-pasting familiar symbols for the phases of the moon (found on many calendars and almanacs) are too difficult for people, but remembering unfamiliar one-letter codes that you invented for them is supposed to be easier? The Gregorian calendar's month and leap pattern is too daunting, yet searching for the dates and times of all the moon phases in a year in an online calendar or almanac, just to figure how to label a week, is supposed to be easy? Knowing to label the weeks in a Gregorian September with an "O" for "October" because they happen to be within the tenth lunation since the last winter solstice, that's supposed to be intuitive for people?  

Note there is no exact one-to-one correspondence between weeks and phases of the moon. The long-term average length of a synodic month is about 29.53058798d=25.644ᘔ33z days (you can read off the fractional dozenal digits as dwells, breathers, trices, lulls, twinklings, and vibes).  So the average length of a synodic moon-phase is 7.382646995d=7.47126ᘔz days. More than a third of a day longer than a week.  But both the Earth's orbit around the Sun, and the Moon's orbit around the Earth are elliptical, and synodic moon phases depend upon both. The Earth speeds up at perihelion and slows down at aphelion; likewise, the Moon speeds up at perigee and slows down at apogee. The result of this complicated three-way dance is that the actual length of each moon phase will vary considerably.  While astronomers with their solar-system models can calculate that for us, that sort of celestial mechanics is not something that "Grandma Jones [of] Fort Nowhere" will likely be able to work out in her head. Whereas "Thirty days hath September... etc." and "Leap every four years, unleap every hundred, releap every four hundred", might just be within her scope.

You say that your week number 4ƐƐ4ᘔz, which started Sunday 2018-09-02T18:00d and ended Sunday 2018-09-09T18:00d, should be labeled with an "o", because a New Moon occurred Sunday 2018-09-09T14:01 (in my timezone, Eastern Daylight Time, according to timeanddate.com).  But how should we label the current week, your week number 4ƐƐ4Ɛz, which started Sunday 2018-09-09T18:00d and ends Sunday 2018-09-16T18:00d?  The next First Quarter won't occur until 2018-09-16T19:14, more than an hour into the following week.

Or consider your week number 4ƐƐ32z from earlier this year.  It started Sunday 2018-04-15T18:00d and ended Sunday 2018-04-22T18:00d.  Within that time, a New Moon occurred Sunday 2018-04-15T21:57d, nearly 4 hours into the week; and a First Quarter occurred Sunday 2018-04-22T17:45d, a quarter-hour before the end of the week. The following week, your week number 4ƐƐ33z, contained no event to give it a label, because the next Full Moon didn't occur until Sunday, 2018-04-29T20:58d, nearly 3 hours into week number 4ƐƐ34z. What is poor Grandma Jones to do with such situations?

Honestly, this half-baked attempt to convey a sense of the passage of "seasons" using lunar-solar calendar concepts, without using the months and years of an actual lunar-solar calendar (like the Hebrew or Islamic ones), seems far more trouble than it's worth.  Saying 4ƐƐ4ᘔz weeks + 4.8700z semidays = 2ᘔƐ,7ᘔ0.436z days = Wednesday 2018-09-05T02:35d provides all the precision anyone could ask for (although I think the count of days.fractional days is simpler).  Any other decoration on top of that is just superfluous embellishment here. 

The one question you haven't addressed is why? Why try to graft moon phases onto what is essentially a week-based system?  What compelling solution, for what pressing problem, is motivating this as a way to keep track of the seasons, when the whole purpose of a pure-solar calendar like the Gregorian was to do precisely that?
I'm well used to my system by now, it seems as simple to me.
I am sure you are used to it, and it does seem "simple" to you. You created it to please yourself, and you're fine with never having had to stress-test it thus far.  If it makes you happy to use it, nobody can take that away from you. But if you want to sell this to other people, you need a better rationale than "hey, I like it", and some more rigorous definition about how to use it than "well, just do whatever ad-hoc adjustments I would do to make it work from week to week".
Still, to change to whole days would change not just my calendar but my metrology–I'd rather be convinced to change my metrology and make my calendar match than vice-versa.
There is nothing that says that a choice of metrology necessarily dictates a choice of calendar reform.  Or vice versa.  They really are completely separable topics.  TGM for instance uses the same divisions of the day you've chosen, yet there is nothing in TGM about suppressing days, months, and years in the calendar, even though none of those are pure dozenal powers of the Tim.  Pendlebury was just interested in physics units.   Likewise the adoption of the second as the coherent time unit for SI hasn't lead to the suppression of days, weeks, months, or years, even though none of those are pure decimal powers of the second.
As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
click on my user name and go to my "Website" link)
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lettoun
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lettoun
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Joined: Aug 28 2018, 09:11 PM

Sep 25 2018, 04:25 AM #7

Well, I 'tried to quote a post too many times', so I'll have to summarize what I initially wanted to say.

Yes. See later. Rename the months if it bothers you.

Of course.

I never mentioned first or third quarter. They have little to do with this. 
If a week is between new and full, it's waxing; vice versa, waning. Two weeks between? Both waxing, or both waning.

"Any other decoration on top of that is just superfluous embellishment here." I can't agree more.

I could keep the Gregorian calendar. But there's so much talk of 'each date be the same day of the week', 'leap years made better like this', etc. I figure, if there's so much to change, just start with something that doesn't have the problems in the first place and fix its problems. 
The only thing that a strict integer multiple of days lacks for a layperson is clear correlation to seasonal holidays. Fiscal matters, say, can use much more technical and accurate calculations.
Just how close is it to New Year's? About 3 months now. Track the solstice precisely in a -day system, and see people forget it constantly.

My system could very well be immensely bad, but nothing about it is contrived or ad-hoc. There's the actual timekeeping, a -day system, and a purely observational and wholly isolated moon tracker. Is the moon tracker formulaic? No. The moon isn't formulaic. (Not easily, anyway.) Indeed, the moon is the most natural, least planned part of it. 
I've used this for well over a year. I don't particularly care to go into the gritty details, because the moon tracker is one of the less interesting things I've put on this board. An observation based system can be "an absolutely horrible choice, with long reaching ramifications". But it's not necessarily unrigorous.

I cannot stress enough, the Month-of-year and Phase-of-moon spots are 100% optional.
4BB51•2A300    
{GMT}

(So you're saying I should have a non-dozenal relationship between my main calendrical unit and my main temporal unit in a system that prizes simplicity over functionality? Oh wait, I arguably already do.)

I hope I didn't forget anything. I see I haven't been going into enough detail in the first post. I also intend to reply to some thread that I didn't start, you know, be vaguely sociable.
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Kodegadulo
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Kodegadulo
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Joined: Sep 10 2011, 11:27 PM

Sep 25 2018, 09:02 AM #8

lettoun wrote: Well, I 'tried to quote a post too many times', so I'll have to summarize what I initially wanted to say.
Yeah, isn't that an annoying "feature" of this new tapatalk interface? I've been bitten by that a few times myself. To the point now that if I find myself previewing a quote-reply, I have to copy and paste it into a new Full Editor & Preview window before going on, lest I risk losing a lot of work with absolutely no prior warning. I don't always remember though. BIG violation of the Principle of Least Surprise in good user experience design! 🤨

At this point, though, it looks like individual paragraphs in your post are replying to specific comments, but it's hard to tell what without the quotes.

Anyway, to summarize, yes, what you have is really a dozenal week count based on a specific but non-standard epoch, plus a count of semidays-in-the-week-and-fractions-thereof, with the topmost digit "supersaturating" (as it were) into base fourteen.  Separately tracking the season and/or the moon phase are add-ons, but they could be add-ons to any system. (And they often are, e.g  moon phases, solstices/equinoxes decorating a Gregorian calendar.)

In contrast, a conventional calendar more or less tracks the years and seasons directly, at the expense of treating the day-of-the-week cycle as a separate add-on.  And getting an absolute day-count for astronomical and other purposes (e.g. Julian Days) is another separate add-on (and a pretty non-trivial computation).

I certainly wouldn't deny you the right to track time in whatever way you like for your own personal satisfaction. The only question is, what can you say to recommend your system to anyone else? What problems does it solve that other systems don't?  Could it be used as an add-on to something else?

Calendar systems tend to be a pain anyway, precisely because they depend on natural cycles, which we really can't do much to regularize. Plus, if you project a proposed system too far back in time, you  come face to face with all the complications of real history: Different calendars and year-numberings were used during different periods in the past. That's why often the best we can say is that we're projecting our own calendar back "proleptically", but to one degree or other, that becomes anachronistic.
As of 1202/03/01[z]=2018/03/01[d] I use:
ten,eleven = ↊↋, ᘔƐ, ӾƐ, XE or AB.
Base-neutral base annotations
Systematic Dozenal Nomenclature
Primel Metrology
Western encoding (not by choice)
Greasemonkey + Mathjax + PrimelDozenator
(Links to these and other useful topics are in my index post;
click on my user name and go to my "Website" link)
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