Rod of Sekhmet

Joined: August 25th, 2013, 6:03 pm

February 25th, 2018, 8:35 pm #1

Dundracon 42 scenario, from February 2018. 
Mythras Adventure - Rod of Sekhmet.pdf (847 KiB)
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Joined: April 18th, 2013, 1:17 am

June 11th, 2018, 11:38 pm #2

This is really nice - what did you use for the PCs? I've been thinking of adapting Mediterráneo Mítico for the Egyptians, how did you handle character gen?
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Joined: August 25th, 2013, 6:03 pm

June 12th, 2018, 8:43 pm #3

Thank you.

Because this was a convention game I provided characters for all the players. I had two goals for the game:
1) Run a game everyone enjoyed.
2) Showcase Mythras as a game system, and convince people it was worth playing.

I created party of 8 characters. Each character was built to fill a specific role, and to act as back-up for another role. The roles were; Fast Fighter, Ranged Fighter, Tank Fighter, Healer, Mechanic, Shaman, Sneak, Sorcerer. The Shaman had some useful spirits, the sorcerer some good 'get around the dungeon' spells. Magic was set up to be strictly supportive - not 'zap and blast'. 

Characters were build using the 10-16 rule: Every character had the following characteristics points: 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, placed in an appropriate order. This gives a characteristic average of 13, but prevents min-maxing. I've found this to be a good practice for conventions, but less appropriate for a common game. I believe in characters with heroic characteristics, a 13 average is pretty good.

All characters were built as beginning characters, and then I added 100 IP/weeks of training to them (using calculated averages for character improvement). That is, some characters were given 80 IP and 20 weeks or training, or 70/30, and so on. This was done to allow the magicians to learn additional spells. Characters ended up with 70%-85% in their primary skills. The magicians had substantially fewer skills than the non-magicians. Magicians, in this context, means the characters who specialize in magic (one priest, one shaman, one sorcerer).

Every character was given magic. This is very important when teaching people used to class-and-level based systems. The concept of everyone having magic is a big selling point for the game. I made sure to showcase all of the types of magic: One strong animist, one weak animist (the hunter), One strong sorcerer, One strong and one weak divine magician, and three who just used folk magic. By making sure people had appropriate spells, pretty much everyone got to use some magic. 

Getting away from game mechanics, characters were designed to be appropriate for supporting the rebels in Egypt: Two Amazigh desert-dwellers, two Egyptian city-dwellers, two Nubian soldiers, a Roman (an agent sent to see if the Ptolemies could be weakened) and a Persian Magi (because our bloody word for magic comes from them, so I always use them as the best spell casters around). No genders were specified, because I would not know what my player mix would be.

I had purposefully set up the introduction so that the players would not have to know/like/want to work together. I was lucky that they simply did. 
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Joined: December 8th, 2013, 3:00 am

June 12th, 2018, 11:40 pm #4

That sums to 91 points--truly a healthy pool!  When I made that pile of NPCs for SSATN, my totals were in the 79--87 range, with most down around 80 (and with no eye toward "balance").  Page 8 in RAW says to use 75 for points-buy (but also lets you buy as many 18s as you like, in principle).  Especially for a convention session, I think it's a good idea to have each character be at least notable, if not exceptional, in some way, so more points are better.

Along those lines, for a con session, I agree:  If you're trying to make a case for a d100 game to people who play class-and-level, then it's a mistake not to give every character some magic.  I can see an exception for certain genres, like S&S, but otherwise this is bound to make an impression, and would be a missed opportunity otherwise.

The bonus XP/training and final skill levels sound good.  Starting with true beginner (young) characters who have max ~75% and more likely ~63% in key skills could be a drag for players used to succeeding a lot.
SAVAGE SWORDS AGAINST THE NECROMANCER is here. Check out Old Bones Publishing on DriveThruRPG.com!
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Joined: April 18th, 2013, 1:17 am

June 12th, 2018, 11:48 pm #5

Thanks, the 10-16 rule is new to me, I went for a similar "roles" mix for a one-shot I ran but I wasn't brave enough to include that many magic systems, out of interest what did you give the sorcerer in terms of spells and did you give guidelines or put 'presets' in place as far as using it goes? I ask this because of it's possible variability.

It's interesting ubiquitous magic being a selling point, I've had a few people turn a game down because "everyone has magic" (and presumably in their eyes is therefore terrible). Certainly makes sense for Egypt.

A nice set of tips thanks!
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Joined: April 18th, 2013, 1:17 am

June 12th, 2018, 11:57 pm #6

Matt_E wrote: That sums to 91 points--truly a healthy pool!  
An alternative closer to RAW might be 17,15,13,11,9,7,5  ...  which is a 77 total, makes for some interesting decisions...
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Joined: August 25th, 2013, 6:03 pm

June 13th, 2018, 3:01 am #7

This is not the place to debate "how many characteristics points to give out". If you want to start a discussion thread in an appropriate forum, I'll be happy to give my views.
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Joined: December 8th, 2013, 3:00 am

June 13th, 2018, 3:06 am #8

Yes, sorry, I didn't mean to derail your thread.
SAVAGE SWORDS AGAINST THE NECROMANCER is here. Check out Old Bones Publishing on DriveThruRPG.com!
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