Moderator: Scrooge McSuck

WWF Flashback: November 1992

Scrooge McSuck
dWb Superstar
Joined: December 8th, 2004, 2:32 am

April 16th, 2018, 3:05 pm #1

WWF NOVEMBER 1992


- Last time on the WWF Flashback… Bret Hart’s 8 ½ year journey in the WWF has finally lead to him winning the WWF Championship, defeating Ric Flair at a TV taping in Saskatoon Saskatchewan… Money Inc. regained the Tag Team Titles from the Natural Disasters, with a helpful distraction from newcomers Samu and Fatu, the Headshrinkers… Speaking of Money Inc., they’ve got The Nasty Boys on their heels, upset about being put on the backburner by Jimmy Hart… Marty Jannetty made his surprise return, attacking Shawn Michaels, and accidentally KO’ing Sensational Sherri with a mirrior… Undertaker has further established Kamala’s fear of coffins, and had a face-to-face confrontation with Nailz that should be going somewhere… Lance Cassidy, Yokozuna, The Headshrinkers, and the mysterious Clown made their TV debuts, Terry Taylor returned after a 2-year absence, and Bam Bam Bigelow is on his way.


- The November 1st episode of Wrestling Challenge features Money Inc. defeating the Natural Disasters for the Tag Team Titles, making it the only time in the history of Challenge where a title changed hands. Unfortunately, the thunder was lost when they decided to feature the match on Superstars, too. To be fair, some markets did get Superstars on Sundays and Challenge on Saturdays, but not as many as the more traditional Saturday Superstars, Sunday Challenge.


- “El Matador” Tito Santana vs. Razor Ramon – From the November 1st episode of Wrestling Challenge. Yep, TWO features on the same episode. SWEEPS MONTH! Santana doesn’t take kindly to having a toothpick thrown at him. He lays into Razor with rights, and sends him to the floor with a diving forearm. Back inside, they trade waist-locks. Santana goes to work on the arm. Whip to the ropes, Santana with a dropkick, followed by an arm drag. Razor punches his way out of an arm bar and plants Santana with a slam. He misses a series of elbows and Santana goes back to the arm. Razor catches Santana coming off the ropes with a Hot Shot. Razor with an abdominal stretch. Santana counters, but Razor quickly escapes with a hip toss. Santana fights out of a bearhug, rolling Razor up for two. Santana introduces Razor to the top turnbuckle, but a monkey flip backfires, and Razor finishes with the Razor’s Edge at 4:46. Razor has TV wins over Virgil and Santana. He’s ready for the Main Event push. Decent for a short syndication match. **


- Max Moon vs. Repo Man – From the November 2nd episode of Prime-Time Wrestling, taped on October 13th from Regina, Saskatchewan. Moon doesn’t have the jetpack anymore. The camera can’t help but catch a young girl laughing at him. He does the Lucha tumbles to try and intimidate Repo Man, but it doesn’t work. Lockup and Repo with an arm drag into the arm-bar. Moon counters, doing a sequence of moves to take Repo off his feet. Repo regains control with a hammer-lock. Repo boots Moon down and tries to pin the shoulders down with a knuckle-lock. Moon bridges up and sweeps the leg for a two-count. Repo with a shoulder to the midsection. Whip to the corner, he catches Moon trying to leap frog him and drops him across the top rope. Repo with a leg drop for two. Whip and Repo with a shoulder tackle. Crisscross and Moon hits Repo with a forearm. Whip to the corner and Moon with a spinning heel kick. He comes off the ropes with a diving elbow for two. Repo has enough, grabs the tow hook, and swings for the fences, but misses. Oh well, Bill Alfonso DQ’s him anyway at 5:43. Post-match, Moon clears Repo from the ring with a dropkick. *1/4


- The Headshrinkers (w/ Afa) vs. Joey Maggs & Brian Costello – From the November 7th episode of Superstars. Samu and Fatu have made a few in-ring appearances on Prime-Time, but this is their Superstars in-ring debut. We get a shot of one kid looking terrified of them. Headshrinkers attack from behind. Samu whips Maggs to the corner and takes him down with a DDT. Costello runs into a Super-Kick. Whip and Samu grabs the hair to slam Costello on his face. Whip and the Headshrinkers with a double body press. Fatu with a one-armed slam. Costello targets the head, but Fatu no-sells and drops him with a Super-Kick. Headshrinkers with the double-team forward leg sweep, and Fatu finishes with the flying Splash at 2:04.


- Bret Hart hype video set to Tom Petty’s “Makin’ Some Noise.” The video would be recycled, with updated in-ring footage, at WrestleMania X, but the modern era presentation of the show excludes the song, for obvious reasons.


- Damien Demento vs. Steve May – From the November 7th episode of Superstars, the in-ring debut of Demento. Once again, no hype videos promoting the debut, and he doesn’t even get his introduction shown, robbing us of one of the greatest “hometowns” in WWF history: The Outer Reaches of Your Mind. Demento previously worked in IWCCW, among other Independents, as Mondo Kleen, basically the same gimmick, minus the name change. Demento pounds away. Whip and a diving shoulder tackle for two. Demento cuts an inset promo about being from the creating of “your mind”. Uh-huh… Snap mare and leg drop. Whip to the ropes and a clothesline. Hangman’s neck breaker and knee drop finishes at 2:28. Lackluster debut.


- The Big Boss Man is in the ring for an interview with some goober we’ve never seen before, and who doesn’t even get introduced. He talks about reading Nailz’s psychological report, and what kind of a criminal he is. He may have beaten the Boss Man, but he didn’t break him. He points to the nightstick hanging on a pole in the corner, and lets us know at Survivor Series, whoever can get their hands on it, gets to use it. Seriously, who was that guy?


- Survivor Series Report! NEW MATCHES SIGNED! We just heard about the Big Boss Man taking on Nailz in a Nightstick Match, although I’m sure it was promoted earlier, but never listed in the Reports. The Bushwhackers are out of the 8-Man Tag Team Match and are replaced by The Nasty Boys. The British Bulldog vs. The Mountie has quietly been dropped from the lineup.


- WWF Tag Team Championship Match: Money Inc. (c) (w/ Jimmy Hart) vs. High Energy – From the November 7th episode of Superstars. Title matches on TV? Sweeps month. Dibiase and Owen start. Lockup and Dibiase with an arm drag. Dibiase with two more arm drags, followed by a scoop slam. Whip to the ropes and Owen with a clothesline. Irwin tries to help, but Koko clears him with a dropkick. Owen with a drop toe hold into the arm-bar. Koko comes off the ropes with a double axe-handle. Dibiase with a knee from the apron, followed by choking. Dibiase comes off the middle rope with an axe-handle. Whip and Koko takes out Irwin with a clothesline. Owen in to pound away with rights. Whip to the ropes and a back drop. Dibiase counters a back drop with a swinging neck breaker, and that’s all it takes for three at 4:19. Heels getting clean victories? I’m shocked. *


- Tatanka vs. Blake Beverly (w/ The Genius & Beau Beverly) – From the November 8th episode of Wrestling Challenge. Tatanka lays out Beau with a clothesline on the way to the ring. Blake pounds away to start. Tatanka comes back with a hip toss and slam before sending him over the top rope with a clothesline. Tatanka pulls Blake in from the apron and drops him on his face. He sends Blake from turnbuckle to turnbuckle. Blake rakes the eyes and drops Tatanka across the top rope. Hangman’s neck breaker for two. Tatanka escapes a chin-lock and no-sells a chop. He lays into Blake with chops of his own. Whip to the ropes and Blake connects with a powerslam. Blake misses a flying headbutt, and it’s comeback time. Tatanka with chops, followed by a clothesline. More chops, including one from the top rope, and the Fallaway Slam finishes at 4:45. *1/2


- Marty Jannetty vs. Skinner – From the November 9th episode of Prime-Time Wrestling, taped on October 13th from Regina, Saskatchewan. To no surprise, Jannetty still comes out to the Rockers music, and Rocker-style tights. Lockup, Skinner with a side headlock, and Jannetty counters with a head scissors. Lather, rinse, repeat. Skinner rolls into a cover, but Jannetty bridges out and takes him over with a back slide for two. Jannetty uses the turnbuckle for leverage to take Skinner over with a side headlock. Crisscross and Jannetty counters a monkey flip with a fist drop. Jannetty with a roll-up for two, followed by a flying head scissors. He misses a dive into the corner, taking a bump to the floor. Back inside, Skinner goes to work on the left leg. Jannetty escapes a spinning toe hold and hits a diving elbow. Whip and a dropkick. Jannetty does an atomic drop, but hurts his own knee in the process. Whip to the corner and Jannetty surprises Skinner with a face-buster. He makes the trip to the top rope, and finishes with the fist drop at 5:45. Perfectly acceptable. It’s like Vince McMahon held a roster meeting and said “knock the crap off and just wrestle.” **


- WWF Championship Match: Bret “Hitman” Hart (c) vs. The Berzerker (w/ Mr. Fuji) – From the November 9th episode of Prime-Time, also taped from Regina, Saskatchewan. The Berzerker went AWOL during SummerSlam week, so any push he was getting is completely dead after serving a suspension. Lockup to the ropes and a clean break. Bret grabs a hammer-lock, but Berzerker throws him down with a handful of hair. Whip to the ropes, Bret ducks a clothesline and throws Berzerker over the top rope by his hair. I love when babyfaces aren’t above stooping to the level of his opponent. Back inside, Berzerker with clubbering blows, followed by a slam. He connects with a delayed piledriver, but doesn’t go for a cover. Bret rolls away from a jumping knee drop. Bret with an inverted atomic drop and diving clothesline. Russian leg sweep for two. Back breaker and second rope elbow drop, setting up the Sharpshooter for the victory at 4:32. Decent match, considering it had the Berzerker involved. *1/2


- WWF Intercontinental Championship Match: The British Bulldog (c) vs. Repo Man – From the November 14th episode of Superstars, and another Sweeps Month Title Match™. Lockup and Repo grabs a waist-lock. Bulldog counters with an arm-bar. Whip to the ropes and Repo with a shoulder tackle. Bulldog with a drop toe hold, then back to the arm-bar. Repo tries to escape with an arm drag, but Bulldog rolls through with the hold applied. Bulldog with a press slam. Crisscross and Repo hits Bulldog with the Hot Shot for a near-fall. Repo with a short-arm scissors as we are informed of Bulldog defending the title later tonight against Shawn Michaels at Saturday Night’s Main Event (if he wins here). Repo with a shoulder breaker for two. Bulldog reverses a whip to the corner and rolls Repo up for two. Repo with a clothesline for two. He connects with a back breaker, but misses an elbow. Bulldog hits him coming off the ropes with a clothesline for two. Bulldog with the suplex for two. Running Powerslam finishes at 4:59. Another surprisingly decent outing from Repo Man. **


- Bob Backlund is still on his way to making his WWF Comeback at the age of 43. Have I mentioned the music used for these vignettes was recycled for the opening video, highlighting moments from WrestleMania 1, at WrestleMania X? So much to learn in the world, and it’s THIS stuff that I retain.


- Our nameless interviewer is standing by for comments from The Natural Disasters and The Nasty Boys. I’m guessing the guy was local, and didn’t impress, so they just decided to move along and look for other talent to fill the role (I’m thinking that spot went to Raymond Rougeau). Quake and Typhoon use disaster metaphors to describe what will happen to the Beverly Brothers, leaving Dibiase and I.R.S. 4-on-2 to face the music.



- Saturday Night’s Main Event – November 14th, 1992 – Presented on the FOX Network, taped on October 27th from Terre Haute, IN. This would be the last episode of SNME until a revival in 2006 thanks to a new relationship with NBC. The show opens with Ed O’Neill, in character as Al Bundy from Married with Children, getting all excited as he prepares to watch the show, too. Vince McMahon and Bobby “The Brain” Heenan are calling the action, unless otherwise noted.


- WWF Tag Team Championship Match: Money Inc. (c) vs. The Ultimate Maniacs – Despite having zero victories as a tag team, Savage and Warrior get a title shot. It’s a donnybrook to start. Warrior gets dumped, but he no-sells and returns the favor to Dibiase. Double clotheslines for all, and one more trip over the top rope, leaving the Maniacs on top of the heap. Savage sends Dibiase into the corner with an atomic drop. Dibiase rakes the eyes of Warrior as he enters. Whip and Warrior counters a back drop with a suplex for two. Dibiase side-steps a diving shoulder tackle, slamming Warrior face-first to the canvas. Irwin in with a sleeper hold. Flair and Ramon cut an inset promo from the locker room. Warrior escapes, so now Dibiase slaps on the Million Dollar Dream. Savage with a running high knee to make the save. Whip and a double clothesline puts Warrior and Dibiase down. Savage in, laying into Irwin with jabs. Savage with a slam and Flying Elbow, but Dibiase breaks the cover. Heck breaks loose, and Money Inc. are cleared from the ring, again. They decide to take a walk at 6:04. Warrior and Savage give chase, but in the immortal words of Admiral Akbar, IT’S A TRAP! Flair, Razor, and Perfect jump them in the aisle for a beatdown. Decent match until the abrupt finish. **1/4


- WWF Intercontinental Championship Match: The British Bulldog (c) vs. Shawn Michaels – It seems like Michaels has been promoted for most of 1992 as the #1 contender to the Intercontinental Title. Lockup and Bulldog throws Shawn on his ass. Shawn with a side headlock, but a shoulder tackle does nothing. Shawn with a flip and hip toss into a short-arm scissors. Bulldog lifts Michaels off the canvas, with the hold applied, and slams him down to break. Whip and Bulldog with a press slam, followed by a clothesline, sending Michaels over and out. Back inside, Michaels goes for a leg sweep, but Bulldog escapes and goes to work on the arm. Bulldog comes out of the corner with a shoulder tackle. He tries it again, but Michaels side-steps him, sending the Bulldog out of the ring. Michaels undoes a turnbuckle pad while we wait for Bulldog to get back inside. Michaels with a snap mare and knees to the back. He slaps on the abdominal stretch, but he’s too far from the ropes to use them for leverage! Bulldog escapes with a hip toss, but misses an elbow drop. Michaels pounds the back and goes back to the stretch. Bulldog escapes again, fakes Michaels out, and drops the elbow. He plants Michaels face-first to the canvas and lays him out with a clothesline. Slingshot into the corner and another clothesline for two. Bulldog with the delayed vertical suplex for two. Whip is reversed and Bulldog hits the exposed buckle. Bulldog crotches Michaels along the top rope and goes for a super-plex, but the back gives out, with Michaels landing on top for the three-count and his 1st Intercontinental Title at 10:26. This would be the last we see of Davey Boy Smith for nearly two years, but more on that in a little bit. Good match. ***


- WWF Championship Match: Bret “Hitman” Hart (c) vs. Papa Shango – At least they didn’t go forward with this rivalry. Shango pounds away with rights. Bret reverses a whip and takes him out of the corner with a monkey flip. Bret with shoulder tackles and a body press for barely a one-count. Bret with an atomic drop and clothesline, sending Shango over the top rope. They’ve done that spot in all three matches, by the way. Bret isn’t done though, following him with a slingshot plancha. Back inside, Shango reverses a whip, sending Bret chest-first into the corner. Bret escapes a bear-hug with the trusted technique of biting. Shango with a double choke-lift and a nerve hold. Bret escapes with elbows. Shango punches the canvas trying to block a sunset flip, then runs into a boot in the corner. Bret hops on his back with sleeper, but Shango slams his face into the turnbuckle. Shango with elbow drops. He goes high risk and predictably misses. Bret with a Russian leg sweep for two. Whip and a back drop for two. Flying clothesline for two. Shango misses a charge to the corner, and Bret finishes with the Sharpshooter at 7:13. Shango is a complete waste in the ring. *1/2


- The Funeral Parlor returns, with The Undertaker cutting a promo to hype the Coffin Match at Survivor Series.


- Bret Hart and Shawn Michaels have a confrontation from the interview set.


- The show concludes with Bobby Heenan on the phone, giving us breaking news that Randy Savage and the Ultimate Warrior are no longer a team, and one of them will be at Survivor Series with a new partner! That’s a heck of a cliffhanger! Before we move forward, we’ll just cover the roster moves right now. The Ultimate Warrior and Davey Boy Smith were both released from their contracts two weeks shy of the Survivor Series. At the time, the picture painted was a “You’re fired/I Quit” scenario, with the reason being that they were allegedly receiving shipments of Human Growth Hormone. With Warrior, it may have been a combination of that and his unhappiness with his character direction, having been passed over in favor of Bret Hart to carry the torch as WWF Champion. Regardless the situation, the loss of the Bulldog hurts when it comes to overseas marketing, but he really hasn’t done much in his two years other than the recent reign as IC Champion where he had little presence on television or in significant angles. Warrior, on the other hand, was brought back from his suspension stemming from a contract dispute in the Summer of 1991 specifically to pick up the slack they were losing with Hulk Hogan on hiatus, and was the center of attention for the Main Event at Survivor Series, even with the Championship out of the picture. With less than two weeks away from the Pay-Per-View, and the relationship completely breaking down again, that puts the WWF in a tight spot where they have very few viable options available that could be considered a reasonable replacement. Does Hulk Hogan come back from hiatus? The original plan was to lay low and possibly come back at SummerSlam, but when they moved the show to Wembley, the idea was put on the backburner. Bret Hart is booked, Undertaker is booked, and that pretty much completes the list of babyfaces who can fill the spot, showing us just how weak the roster depth is at the top. [Note: I didn’t notice, but the Mountie has quietly left the company for unrelated issues, which explains why they dropped his match with Bulldog a few weeks ago.]


- The Big Boss Man vs. Shawn Michaels – From the November 15th episode of Wrestling Challenge. Shawn isn’t introduced as the Intercontinental Champion, for obvious reasons (the commentary is for the Saturday edition of Challenge). Lockup and Boss Man grinds away with a side headlock. Boss Man holds on with a handful of hair. Michaels with a cheap shot in the corner. Whip to the corner, Boss Man slides out and they do a quick sequence ending with Boss Man hitting a big boot and clothesline (the spot lives on today for Baron Corbin). Whip to the corner and Boss Man follows in with an avalanche. Boss Man goes to the top rope, but misses whatever he was going for and hangs himself up on the top rope. Michaels with rights and a dropkick. Boss Man blocks the tear-drop suplex and connects with an uppercut. He hits the seated splash and another uppercut. Michaels rolls away from a splash and connects with the Super-Kick, knocking Boss Man over the top rope. Nailz makes his way to ringside, and Boss Man decides a stare-down is worth taking the count-out at 4:31. Michaels tries holding Boss Man back, but he fights free and backs Nailz down with the nightstick. Decent action until the non-finish. *1/2


- The November 16th episode of Prime-Time Wrestling hosts one of my favorite, and the be honest, a rare for its era, show-long storyline. Vince McMahon, Mr. Perfect, Bobby Heenan, Jim Duggan, and Hillbilly Jim make up our expert panel this week. The big news going around is that the Ultimate Warrior is gone, and Randy Savage is in desperate need of a partner for Survivor Series. Jack Tunney has given him 24-hours to find that replacement, OR ELSE. Vince McMahon says it’ll be a big payday for whoever he selects. Savage says he’s got someone in mind that he doesn’t even like, but sometimes you need to take a chance. He says that his choice of partner knows his opponents at WrestleMania better than he does. That person would be the perfect tag team partner…. Mr. Perfect. Heenan agrees that he knows more about Ric Flair than anyone. Perfect takes exception to being called a manager while Heenan continues to grill Savage. Perfect gets a phone call, and whatever is being said on the other line is peaking Perfect’s interest. The issue of Perfect’s absence from the ring is brought up, and possibly being kept on the sideline intentionally by his camp. Heenan kisses up to him but continues to put his foot in his mouth. McMahon points out the inaccuracies of Heenan’s brown-nosing, continuing to drive a wedge between the two.

Ric Flair and Razor Ramon are standing by with their reactions. Razor says used to be somebody, but now he works for them, and does what they want. Flair continues to point out that he’s the best wrestler alive, and Perfect is his consultant that walks behind him to the ring. Everyone presses Perfect on who he thinks is the better wrestler between himself and Flair and gives the obvious answer. Flair and Razor naturally don’t agree with his response. Choice words and phrases like “has-been” and “walking in Flair’s shadow” keep getting thrown about. Randy Savage is back “from Sarasota” (but more likely standing off to the side in front of a curtain). He says maybe Perfect is afraid of Razor and says it’s cold in the shadow of Flair. Perfect says he’s not afraid of anyone and will wrestle all three at once. “If you got the guts, then accept the challenge.” Perfect says he’ll consider it, sending Heenan over the deep end. Flair and Razor rejoin the discussion. Flair says there’s nothing wrong with walking in his shadow. Savage yells at Perfect to be a man and not a baby, and he needs an answer in the next 30-minutes. Heenan lays down the law about following orders. Perfect says he’s tired of taking orders and accepts Savage’s offer. Heenan jumps up and slaps Perfect. Perfect yanks him by the tie and cuts a promo on not walking in Flair’s shadow any more. Heenan begs for mercy, so Perfect dumps a pitcher of water on his head, calling him a wet weasel. You know, when you dig deep and really analyze things: Mr. Perfect’s return was set at something like 12-14 months, starting from the date of his last in-ring appearance in 1991. What an amazing coincidence that Warrior’s departure lined up perfectly with when Hennig was cleared to return to the ring. If Warrior doesn’t flake, it’s curious to think where he would’ve been used.


- Lance Cassidy vs. “Terrific” Terry Taylor – From the November 16th episode of Prime-Time Wrestling, taped on October 26th from Springfield, IL. It’s the ultimate battle of geeks without pushes. Lockup and they trade arm drags. Taylor complains about being hit with an elbow. Taylor tries returning the favor, but Cassidy counters with a series of arm drags before settling in with the arm-bar. Taylor escapes with headbutts and grabs a hammer-lock. Cassidy with a bridge and counter, going back to work on the arm. Whip to the corner and Cassidy meets the post. Taylor with a takedown, hooking a side arm-bar. Cassidy with rights, but Taylor dumps him out of the ring to cut off his comeback. Cassidy comes in with a sunset flip for two. Taylor with a short clothesline for two. Whip to the ropes and Cassidy with a Thesz Press for two. Cassidy counters a suplex with the first half of an O’Connor Roll for two. Inside cradle for two. Crisscross and Cassidy surprises him with a leg sweep. Whip to the ropes and a diving shoulder tackle for two. Cassidy with a slam and flying body press, and they both roll through until Cassidy ends up on top for two. Taylor with a gut-wrench Liger-Bomb, but the bell rings at 9:28 for the Time Limit Draw. Paint-by-numbers wrestling match. Don’t quote me, but I’m almost positive this is our last “time limit” finish for quite a few years. */34


- “El Matador” Tito Santana vs. Damien Demento – From the November 16th episode of Prime-Time, also taped from Springfield, IL. Lockup to the ropes and a clean break. Demento with an overhead wrist-lock. Santana counters, but Demento goes to the ropes. Meanwhile, the Clown is hanging around in the crowd, again. Crisscross and Santana with a body press for two. Demento with strikes in the corner. Whip across the ring, Santana avoids the charge, and takes him over with an arm drag. Demento with a snap mare and leg drop for two. Santana comes back, slamming Demento face-first into the turnbuckle a bunch of times. He plants Demento with a slam and follows up with a dropkick. Santana with the Flying Forearm, knocking Demento to the floor. Demento comes back in with a shoulder to the midsection and covers with a handful of tights, but Bill Alfonso is the world’s worst referee and calls for the DQ at 4:45. Oh my God, enough with these finishes. ½*


- The November 16th episode of Prime-Time also featured the following recycled matches: High Energy vs. The Beverly Brothers (taped on June 3rd from Cornwall, Ontario), The Big Boss Man vs. Rick Martel (taped on September 1st from Hershey, PA), and Jim Duggan vs. Repo Man (taped on April 19th from Sheffield, England).


- WWF Championship Match: Bret “Hitman” Hart (c) vs. Virgil – From the November 21st episode of Superstars. No, that’s not a typo. Bret is defending his WWF Champion at a record pace, and even scrubs like Virgil are getting championship opportunities. McMahon reminds us that Bret has defeated The Berzerker, Papa Shango, and The Mountie in recent weeks. Handshake to start (what is this, the Cruiserweight Classic?). Lockup and Virgil with a waist-lock takedown. He takes Bret over with a side headlock. Crisscross and Virgil with a body press for two. Bret counters a second headlock with a head scissors and grabs his own headlock. Whip to the ropes and Bret with a clothesline, followed by an elbow drop. He plants Virgil with a slam and sends him to the turnbuckle. Whip across the ring, Virgil avoids a charge and rams Bret in the midsection with a series of shoulders. He sends Bret across the ring and takes him out of the corner with a monkey flip for two. He tries a blind body press, but there’s no water in the pool, and Bret puts him away with the Sharpshooter at 4:14. Post-match, Bret makes nice with his fallen opponent. Decent considering it involved Virgil. **


- Jerry Sags vs. Beau Beverly (w/ The Genius) – From the November 22nd episode of Wrestling Challenge. Beau attacks from behind and pounds away. Sags hasn’t even gotten his jacket off! Whip to the ropes and Sags comes back with a clothesline. He exits the ring, chasing the Genius from ringside. That’s a slow 10-count from referee Bill Alfonso. Back inside, Beau puts the boots to Nasty Boy Sags. Sags makes his comeback as the Genius returns to ringside. Beau with a handful of tights to send Sags out of the ring. Monsoon calls this a “small sample” of what we’ll see at Survivor Series. If that’s the case, I’m glad we didn’t order that PPV. Beau with a flying double axe-handle for two. Beau goes up one more time and meets the boot on the way down. Sags with a boot to the midsection and a face-buster. Whip to the ropes and Sags with a side suplex. He climbs the ropes and hits the elbow drop for three at 4:41. Post-match, Sags gives the Genius the Pit-Stop and clotheslines him over the top rope. DUD


- Bob Backlund vs. Brian Costello – From the November 22nd episode of Wrestling Challenge, and the in-ring return of Backlund. Monsoon puts over his credentials that seem to be from an era long, long forgotten. Handshake to start the match. Backlund counters a hip toss with an abdominal stretch, then quickly throws Costello. Costello picks the leg but Backlund avoids a sweep, then has the same lack of success going for a waist-lock. Backlund cuts THE most boring inset promo as he wrestles Costello like it’s 1979. Backlund with a shoulder tackle, hip toss, and arm drag. He takes Costello over with a butterfly suplex and pins him with a three-quarter nelson at 2:46. White-bread babyface Bob Backlund will not get over based on this one match.


- Tatanka vs. Repo Man – From the 1992 Survivor Series Showdown, probably the weakest of the “tease the PPV” specials, with only two feature matches. Lockup into the corner and a (surprisingly) clean break. It doesn’t take Repo long to get a cheap shot in at some point, though. Whip to the ropes and Tatanka comes back with a hip toss, followed by a pair of dropkicks. Inset promo from Rick Martel, calling Tatanka “Buffalo breath.” Tatanka works the arm as Heenan and Monsoon push the card at Survivor Series. Repo blocks a sunset flip but punches the canvas and gets rolled up for two. Tatanka misses a blind body press, finally making way for Repo Man to get some offense, mostly consisting of an arm-bar. Tatanka rallies with chops. He plants Repo with a slam and comes off the top with a chop to the top of the head for two. Repo hangs onto the ropes to block a roll-up attempt. Tatanka ducks a clothesline and finishes with the Fallaway Slam at 7:44. One-sided match for Tatanka to get fan hyped for his match with Martel at Survivor Series. ¾*


- Earthquake vs. Irwin R. Schyster (w/ Jimmy Hart) – Unlike the previous match, this one directly teases something for Survivor Series, with Quake and I.R.S. on opposite teams in an 8-Man Tag. Before the match, we get a long recap of how Money Inc. regained the belts and the Nasty Boys turned babyface. I.R.S. tries to grab an overhead wrist-lock, but Quake throws him down with ease. Quake with a pair of headlocks and shoulder tackles, then clears Irwin out with clotheslines. Irwin gets a boot up to counter an avalanche and hops on Earthquake’s back with a sleeper. Earthquake escapes and catches I.R.S. off the ropes with a bear-hug. I’ve said it before and I’ll continue to say it… it’s hard to get sympathy for a babyface that’s twice the size of his opponent. Quake with an atomic drop that sends Irwin over the top rope. Ted Dibiase and Typhoon make their way to ringside as Earthquake continues to dominate. I.R.S. rolls away from an elbow and drops the leg across the midsection. Chin-lock applied, and yes, he uses the ropes for leverage. I.R.S. with three elbow drops for two. Quake makes another comeback, preventing I.R.S. from escaping by stepping on the tie. He misses a charge but won’t give Irwin more than 30-seconds of offense unless it’s a chin-lock. Whip to the ropes, Quake with a clothesline and elbow drop. He goes for the Vertical Splash but Dibiase trips him up for the Disqualification at 11:11. Post-match, Typhoon chases the nogoodniks away. Babyface Earthquake sucked, and I.R.S. isn’t the man to get a thing out of him. ¼*


- Bam Bam Bigelow vs. Jerry Fox – From the November 28th episode of Superstars, and the in-ring debut/return of the Beast from the East. Lockup, Bigelow throws Fox into the corner. Whip across the ring and he charges in with an avalanche. Bigelow with a brain buster suplex and enzuigiri. Whip to the ropes and he turns Fox inside-out with a clothesline. Bigelow with a dropkick. He plants Fox with a gut-wrench suplex and finishes with the flying headbutt at 2:00. Bigelow’s offense looked inspired, but I’d expect it to be toned down since he’s a heel and he wrestled too much like a babyface.


- The Reverend Slick is standing by with his irregular sermon, talking up Thanksgiving and Survivor Series. Babyface Slick is now a character on syndication, escaping the confines of Prime-Time Wrestling, which typically existed in its own universe.


- From the November 28th episode of Superstars, “Mean” Gene Okerlund is standing by for an interview with the returning Marty Jannetty. If you’ll recall, he made his presence felt last month, attacking Shawn Michaels, but inadvertently hitting the Sensational Sherri with Michaels’ mirror. He comes out to his Rocker music and wearing Rocker-inspired tights. Jannetty says he’s spent the last 8-months recovering and ashamed of himself. His father once told him to never respect anyone that doesn’t respect you. He’s learned his lesson from Shawn Michaels and he doesn’t respect him. He’s not back for glory and titles, he’s back to kick Shawn’s butt. Not the strongest promo.


- From the November 29th episode of Wrestling Challenge, “Mean” Gene Okerlund is standing by for an interview with “New Intercontinental Champion” Shawn Michaels. Michaels says he’s ready for all comers, and scoffs at the idea of Marty Jannetty coming after him. “The last time I saw you Jannetty, you were so petrified of Shawn Michaels, you went diving out the barber shop window.” Okerlund insinuates that Shawn Michaels has shown zero interest in the well-being of Sherri since being struck with the mirror. He says he’s going to take care of Jannetty sooner or later and tells Sherri to sit by the phone and wait for it to ring. He’s got a lot of demands, but he’ll call her as soon as he can.


- Tatanka vs. Papa Shango – From the November 30th episode of Prime-Time Wrestling, taped on October 28th from Louisville, KY. Shango attacks from behind and sends Tatanka to the turnbuckle. Whip to the ropes, Tatanka hangs back to avoid a dropkick and lays into Shango with chops. Whip to the corner and Tatanka meets the buckle on a charge. Shango controls doing as little as possible, like choking Tatanka across the top rope. We slow things down even more with the token nerve hold. Tatanka escapes with elbows to the midsection. He connects with a pair of dropkicks, followed by a diving body press for two. Tatanka comes off the ropes with more chops for two. Shango has enough, grabs his voodoo stick, and sprays Tatanka for the Disqualification at 5:54. Nothing match with a terrible finish. DUD


- WWF Intercontinental Championship Match: Shawn Michaels (c) vs. Virgil – From the November 30th episode of Prime-Time Wrestling, also taped on October 28th from Louisville, KY. Virgil hasn’t won a match in months, so he keeps getting title opportunities. This match was recycled for two Coliseum Videos released in 1993, believe it or not. Michaels with some chain wrestling and a snap mare. Crisscross, Shawn takes Virgil down with a drop toe hold and slaps him around. Virgil counters a hammer-lock with an elbow to the side of the head. He connects with an inverted atomic drop and dropkick for two. Whip to the corner and Virgil with a twisting body press for two. Shawn blocks a roll-up and drops Virgil with (not quite) Sweet Chin Music. Shawn with a standing dropkick and snap mare into the chin-lock. Virgil escapes with elbows and surprises Shawn with a back slide for two. Shawn quickly puts Virgil back down with a clothesline, followed by a vertical suplex. Whip to the ropes, Virgil counters a back drop by slamming Shawn backwards against the canvas. Virgil with a double boot in the corner, followed by a clothesline. Shawn completely over-sells a right-hand. Flying clothesline for two. Virgil misses a knee in the corner, and Shawn finishes with the tear-drop suplex at 7:09. Perfectly acceptable wrestling (which happens to be Virgil’s ceiling, unless something amazing happens). **1/2


Final Thoughts: That was a long month to get through, thanks to Sweeps and desperation to attract viewers for Prime-Time Wrestling by giving away more feature matches than ever before. Bret Hart is being established as “the most fighting Champion” in WWF History. Shawn Michaels dethroned Davey Boy Smith (see you again in two years, by the way) for the Intercontinental Title and is penciled for a feud with former partner Marty Jannetty. Mr. Perfect returned from a 14-month absence in the ring, turning against Heenan, Flair, and Razor, all because of Warrior’s departure (see you again in 3 ½ years, by the way). The Nasty Boys turned babyface to kick-off a program with Money Inc. over the Tag Team Titles. We saw the final episode of Saturday Night’s Main Event (see you again in 13 years, by the way), and we got the debuts/returns of Bam Bam Bigelow, Bob Backlund, and Damien Demento.
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Erick Von Erich
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Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

April 16th, 2018, 3:23 pm #2

That mystery interviewer--- I've seen him on a few broadcasts from this time and have no idea who he is, either! Whoever he is/was, he never got an introduction. He had the interviewer jacket and everything. I originally thought he was Jacques Rougeau, but that ain't right.

Someone will always try to "answer" by saying: "was it Charlie Minh?"
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Scrooge McSuck
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Joined: December 8th, 2004, 2:32 am

April 16th, 2018, 3:35 pm #3

I checked the Wrestling Observer archives and no info there, either. We're a few months away from the WWF debut of Boni Blackstone, though. This one guy might be the only person in existence that I cannot identify that appeared on WWF television in the 1990's. BASTARD!
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Erick Von Erich
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April 16th, 2018, 4:34 pm #4

Boni Blackstone was sorta' the anti-Missy Hyatt, as she actually seemed like an intelligent person. 1993 for the WWF is incredibly weird, to me, because it seems like they became "Southern" for about a year. Luger, Jim Cornette, Rock N' Roll Express, Jim Ross, Blackstone, Razor Ramon, Jerry Lawler (Memphis), Lightning Kid (GWF).

Everything was cyclical in the 80's and 90's, so guys would rotate around with no issues. But seeing all of these former JCP/NWA/WCW guys in the WWF, at the same time, was kinda' weird.
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Scrooge McSuck
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Joined: December 8th, 2004, 2:32 am

April 16th, 2018, 5:25 pm #5

You say southern and don't remember the greatest entertainer to come to WWF in '93 to take over the country music business?!



'93 feels like the last grasp of using anyone and anything without starting from scratch that they could get their hands on.
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HeenanandMonsoon
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HeenanandMonsoon
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Joined: June 13th, 2016, 10:44 pm

April 16th, 2018, 7:22 pm #6

For the life of me I cant remember the mystery interviewer from this time period. I remember him interviewing the Disasters/Nasty Boys prior to SSeries that year and after that he was pretty much gone.

Who is he??!!
Founder of the Humanoid Nation Community on PSN

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Erick Von Erich
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April 16th, 2018, 8:17 pm #7

Scrooge McSuck wrote:You say southern and don't remember the greatest entertainer to come to WWF in '93 to take over the country music business?!
Sorry. I forgot how to spell his name.


I can find no mention of the "mystery interviewer" in the text mess that is "TheHistoryofWWE". He was basically a "generic white guy with brown hair". Hard to find anything significant on that.
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kbenn123
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kbenn123
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Joined: April 16th, 2018, 10:12 pm

April 16th, 2018, 10:13 pm #8

I think the interviewer's name was Joe Beamon or something similar.
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Erick Von Erich
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Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

April 17th, 2018, 2:30 pm #9

kbenn123 wrote:I think the interviewer's name was Joe Beamon or something similar.
That name (or something like it) sounds familiar, now that you mention it.

I don't think I recall it from watching WWF TV, but rather from somebody, somewhere, sometime identifying him on the Internets.
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