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Scrooge McSuck
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Joined: December 8th, 2004, 2:32 am

January 19th, 2017, 6:01 pm #11

I'm having trouble remembering what I had for breakfast today. I think we know where this joke is going. Rickey seemed to sneak his way into any conversation, even non-baseball ones.
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torturedsoulv1
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torturedsoulv1
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Joined: April 17th, 2010, 9:33 pm

January 20th, 2017, 6:07 am #12

Erick Von Erich,Jan 19 2017 wrote: Tim Wakefield got one vote. Most likely from somebody in Boston.

The minor story coming out of this was to the tune of "Bonds and Clemens increase their chance for next year". Yet next year sees Chipper Jones and Jim Thome arrive on the ballot... plus Johnny Damon to grab that obligatory Worthless Boston Vote. Thome and Jones are highly probable for next year.

Still not excited about Raines. He's the latest Goose Gossage or Jim Rice. Guys whose careers were "Pretty Good" and their baseball cards were 2-5 cents above "common", but made it into the HOF on their final years thanks to writer sympathy. Would've rather had Lee Smith over Tim Raines.
Rice was a HOFer for sure IMO
Was one of the best when I started watching in '76 and '77

Goose was great as well, he would have gotten in sooner if not for the stigma against relievers
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Erick Von Erich
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Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

January 20th, 2017, 5:36 pm #13

I kinda' feel Rice's career was comparable to Dave Parker. Nobody really complained when Parker disappeared from the ballot.

Gossage I equate to Bruce Sutter, who I also feel isn't exactly HOF worthy. Both of them are comparable to Jeff Reardon. While Reardon was getting some HOF consideration for awhile, it's good that he didn't make the cut. Once again, I'd rather have Lee Smith. Or even John Franco.

The stigma against relievers was sorta' eradicated when Rollie Fingers went in (when was that--1990 or 1991). Guys really didn't start racking up the big save numbers until the 90's. Mostly due to the fact that it wasn't an official statistic until the 70's. Had it gained more prominence before the 70's, it's entirely possible that someone like Roy Face would've been a Hall of Famer.

I still think it's an important stat. 300 saves used to be the unofficial benchmark for HOF consideration, but it should probably be 400 or more, nowadays. Guys like Robb Nen, Rod Beck and Brad Lidge looked dominant for a few seasons. But guys like Trevor Hoffman and Mariano Rivera were dominant for almost their entire careers.
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torturedsoulv1
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torturedsoulv1
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Joined: April 17th, 2010, 9:33 pm

January 21st, 2017, 11:00 pm #14

Erick Von Erich,Jan 20 2017 wrote: I kinda' feel Rice's career was comparable to Dave Parker. Nobody really complained when Parker disappeared from the ballot.

Gossage I equate to Bruce Sutter, who I also feel isn't exactly HOF worthy. Both of them are comparable to Jeff Reardon. While Reardon was getting some HOF consideration for awhile, it's good that he didn't make the cut. Once again, I'd rather have Lee Smith. Or even John Franco.

The stigma against relievers was sorta' eradicated when Rollie Fingers went in (when was that--1990 or 1991). Guys really didn't start racking up the big save numbers until the 90's. Mostly due to the fact that it wasn't an official statistic until the 70's. Had it gained more prominence before the 70's, it's entirely possible that someone like Roy Face would've been a Hall of Famer.

I still think it's an important stat. 300 saves used to be the unofficial benchmark for HOF consideration, but it should probably be 400 or more, nowadays. Guys like Robb Nen, Rod Beck and Brad Lidge looked dominant for a few seasons. But guys like Trevor Hoffman and Mariano Rivera were dominant for almost their entire careers.
I felt Rice was better than Parker

Sutter and Lee Smith are HOf worthy

Franco was close
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