Mad Dog
dWb Superstar
Mad Dog
dWb Superstar
Joined: December 10th, 2004, 11:01 pm

August 11th, 2017, 3:00 pm #151

It has a very 90s Vertigo feel to it. Starts off with him attempting to commit suicide. There's also moments where he appears to be suffering hallucinations and just general depression. Then High Father has been killed and despite not wanting to go he has to be called into action.
Quote
Like
Share

Erick Von Erich
dWb Superstar
Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

August 11th, 2017, 3:11 pm #152

There ya' go! Thanks, bud.

A Vertigo feel may be the better way to go with Mr. Miracle. Trying to incorporate him into "regular" superhero stuff is usually tough. Or the other route with Mr. Miracle has been to overload on the New Gods stuff. Neither really worked well, so hope this run is different.

BTW, who is Mr. Miracle, nowadays? Shilo Norman, Scott Free or someone else?
Quote
Like
Share

Mad Dog
dWb Superstar
Mad Dog
dWb Superstar
Joined: December 10th, 2004, 11:01 pm

August 11th, 2017, 3:37 pm #153

Big Barda was around and he was hallucinating about Oberon so it's Scott Free. When I say Vertigo, the art and mood are very Vertigo feeling to me. The writer is Tom King and I picked it up because I've been enjoying Batman a lot.
Quote
Like
Share

Erick Von Erich
dWb Superstar
Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

August 11th, 2017, 5:24 pm #154

I think the common burden with Mr. Miracle is that modern writers feel a need to pay homage to Jack Kirby. We get it...Kirby was a huge part of modern comics; but he also contributed to good chunk of other, currently-running, DC/Marvel comics where he's not constantly worshipped. I remember a late 90's/early 2000's Mr. Miracle series that was nothing but a Kirby Blow-Job.

Plus author Michael Chabon's weird and recurring love affair with Big Barda, which only adds to the pile.
Quote
Like
Share

Mad Dog
dWb Superstar
Mad Dog
dWb Superstar
Joined: December 10th, 2004, 11:01 pm

August 11th, 2017, 6:25 pm #155

I liked the Mister Miracle in 7 Soldiers of Victory.
Quote
Like
Share

Erick Von Erich
dWb Superstar
Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

August 14th, 2017, 3:31 pm #156

Star Wars #50
A lethal disease dubbed "The Crimson Forever" begins eating its way through both the Rebels and the Empire. Even Luke is hit with it. Lando and Chewbacca are called back from their search for Han Solo, to help. It all (loosely) relates to a flashback story with Han & Chewie and some red gems. Just a chance to whip up a Han & Chewie story; one that seems like it'd fit with their paperback adventures ("Han Solo and the Lost Legacy", etc. I actually read all 3, as a kid, and thought they were cool....back then).

In the present, the "Crimson" turns out to be a plot by Domina Tagge, who hates both sides (err...what about her brother who was still in the Empire?). Bossk, IG-88, Dengar and "Zuckass" all make very short cameos, as they're working for Domina. The Rebels are able to steal an antidote from Domina, but Lando lets it slip that she's wanted by the Empire....so it's implied that the bounty hunters turn her in.

The Rebels also have a temporary base on the volcanic planet Golrath. I only mention that, because it comes back in about 2 years. Oh, and while all the other infected Rebels die, Luke doesn't...because he has the Force. Just deal with it.

Last issue for Archie Goodwin, thankfully. His stories were self-indulgent sci-fi that could have fit in just about ANY franchise. I think (hope) this is the end of the Tagge stuff. Goodwin seemed SO in love with the clan. The big connection between Baron Tagge and Darth Vader was never detailed. He always complained how Vader blinded him, but there wasn't even a one panel flashback.

Star Wars #51
First issue for new writer David Michelinie; known for "Iron Man", "Avengers" and "Amazing Spider-Man"; a somewhat overlooked (and decent) Marvel writer. He immediately name-drops "Emperor Palpatine" in the opening captions. Think that's the first time we've seen that name. Walt Simonson is the permanent penciler, now, as well.

The Rebels are out looking for a new base, while the Empire is busy building "The Tarkin"--- their next superweapon. It's basically the big laser of the Death Star, with stuff built around it. The Rebels have the plans (of course), but as there's no flaw, they decide to sneak-in Luke, Leia, Chewie and the droids.

General Reeikan, the guy from Hoth, is the "supreme commander of the Rebel fleet". Again, Dodonna has completely disappeared with no explanation and, of course, Admiral Ackbar and Mon Mothma were still years away (plus that gray-haired guy whose name I always forget). Can't really blame Marvel for this, because the Rebellion's chain-of-command and organization was never clearly defined by George Lucas.

Also of note, Darth Vader kills another Imperial officer who couldn't catch Luke. So a secret plot is hatched by a good chunk of Imperial officers to KILL Vader. Which...absolutely seems like a believable and natural plot! Vader was always killing his own guys, so it makes sense that some would rally around a "Julius Caesar plot".

Even though we're in the second half of 1981, it FINALLY feels like "Empire Strikes Back" happened. Vader's in his big star destroyer, the Scout-Walkers and AT-AT's make appearances and it explains why the Empire hasn't built another Death Star (just yet). They also stir up the tension between Lando and the cast; whereas in his previous Marvel appearances, Lando was just slotted in and kept saying: "we have to find Han".
Quote
Like
Share

Erick Von Erich
dWb Superstar
Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

August 16th, 2017, 4:37 pm #157

Star Wars #52
After getting my hopes up with issue 51, they're stomped out by the end of this issue. The Tarkin is easily destroyed when Leia simply crosses some wires on the big ionic canon, causing it to self-destruct. In most versions of Star Wars, Imperial base security is usually pretty lax (even in Episode 7), so I'll let it go.

The plot to kill Vader is activated as an Officer triggers an airlock, sending him out into space. But Vader uses The Force to simply walk back in.

Lando makes good with the cast by helping them all escape. So we're right back to "normal" in the comics world. Aside from the quick dismissal of the Tarkin and the Vader assassination plot, this was still an improvement. Probably the best Marvel use of Vader, to this point.

Star Wars #53-54
Leia crash lands on a world nearly identical to John Carter's Mars. Written by Chris Claremont and the temporary return of Carmine Infantino (with Simonson embellishing), this absolutely sucks. It feels like the Star Wars comic suddenly merged into Marvel's 1970's "John Carter: Warlord of Mars" series. Again, it's more self-indulgent sci-fi crap for some writer.

Marvel's explanation was: yes, this was a blatant homage to Edgar Rice Burroughs and John Carter--- which inspired many elements of Star Wars. Absolutely true. Still, there were other ways to do it without jumping head-on into the sword, sorcery and barbarian stuff. A good way to pay homage to Burroughs: Jabba's sail barge in Return of the Jedi.

One positive note: Simonson seems to have full reign on the covers, as his style really shows on those.


Also, one thing I completely missed from issue 48 (the "Leia vs. Vader" one): it was written by Larry Hama. Not that Hama is amazing, but this was definitely not one of his finer moments. So there's a big Star Wars-meets-GI-Joe connection.
Quote
Like
Share

Erick Von Erich
dWb Superstar
Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

August 16th, 2017, 4:53 pm #158

Star Wars #55
Back to Michelinie and Simonson, as the Rebels finally find a new base. It's the planet Arbra, which the Rebels nickname "Salvation". It's very similar to Endor... only with big mountains, as well as giant trees.

It's also the introduction of probably my favorite Star Wars "expanded universe" character- Plif! He's basically a cute little telepathic bunny and spokesman for his race, the Hoojibs. They eat energy, but after a brief misunderstanding, the Rebels help the Hoojibs regain their main cave from a flying green monster. Leia wants to leave the Hoojibs alone and feels bad about settling on their planet... but Plif is incredibly nice, cool with sharing, and welcomes everybody.

I'm pretty sure Plif sticks around for the remainder of the series. The Hoojibs are somewhat similar to the upcoming Episode VIII "Porgs". Supposedly, the Porgs were inspired by puffins... but if they also turn out to be telepathic, I'll probably poo myself.

A sub-plot has Lando flying back to Cloud City to see what's happened there since "Empire".
Quote
Like
Share

Mad Dog
dWb Superstar
Mad Dog
dWb Superstar
Joined: December 10th, 2004, 11:01 pm

August 17th, 2017, 9:55 pm #159

Dark Nights: Metal #1:

There have been two lead up books to this. I think the point of this is going to be eventually bringing back the JSA and Marvel Family to the DCU. It's been a pretty solid story through 3 books. They've been a little mysterious what the big bad trouble is. But it has a little more of a horror vibe to it and it's nice to have an event that feels a little different. Still early and I could see this book going south quick.
Quote
Like
Share

Erick Von Erich
dWb Superstar
Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

August 24th, 2017, 8:50 pm #160

Star Wars #56-57
Lando returns to Cloud City, where the Ugnaughts (those little pig-looking guys) have hatched a plan to bomb the entire complex. So everybody's been evacuated--- to the surface of Bespin, below. Huh. Sure, they still mention that Bespin is a "gas giant", but this is another big stretch.

The surface of Bespin is home to the Ugnaughts, who all speak with Scottish accents and are led by "King Ozz". As silly as it sounds. They're like the Ewoks meets Blackstar's Trobbits. They even have an "action news" camera team. With Lando and Lobot's help, they're able to return Cloud City to normal, re-populate it, and let the Empire think it's been destroyed.

Started out kinda' interesting, with Lando returning to a deserted Cloud City and a brief fight with Lobot. The second issue destroyed the story, though. Marvel also cooks up two interesting items: an Imperial Troop Shuttle; which looks like a TIE bomber morphed with a metal mosquito. Plus some technical/medical Storm Troopers; who look like Snow Troopers with little hard hats on them. Respectable effort.

One important note: Shira Brie debuts. She's a rebel fighter pilot, who quickly becomes buddies with Luke, calling him "Ace". She'll stick around for awhile and becomes pretty key to the plots.
Quote
Like
Share