Scrooge McSuck
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Joined: December 8th, 2004, 2:32 am

July 27th, 2017, 11:36 pm #141

I always found it weird that Boba Fett is only named "Bounty Hunter" in Empire, although in later years, I just assumed Vader does it out of disgust for their profession. Even when his name is spoken in Jedi, it's during the chaotic saarlac pit scene when there's a million things going on. Fanboys wet dream character, ladies and gentleman: only good enough to have his name spoken right before he dies (and don't give me the expanded universe crap about escaping).
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Scrooge McSuck
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Joined: December 8th, 2004, 2:32 am

July 28th, 2017, 2:21 am #142

FUGITOID #1 (Summer 1985)



(The front cover inside page has a letter for the readers, signed by Eastman and Laird, detailing the origins of the “Fugitoid” character. He actually predates the TMNT by several months, and was part of a 5 chapter story that was shopped around to publishers, unsuccessfully. The saga, and other short stories, would be used in a small run of self-printed comics known as “Gobbledygook”. They also seem pleased to let us know that starting with the Fugitoid, all Mirage Comics will feature FULL COLOR covers. The last line seems to be fishing for support, promising a Fugitoid #2 if it draws the desired reaction… and no, there is no Fugitoid #2. The Fugitoid character must’ve been featured at least once in the 1987 animated series, since I recall (and have sitting in front of me) a Fugitoid PlayMates action figure, although with a slightly different design… and with that LONG winded introduction out of the way, lets dive into the issue!)



Side Note: This is a larger-than-normal printing, resembling the size of a common magazine, rather than the standard comic book size. OK, NOW we’re jumping in…



Chapter 1: We’re immediately introduced to Dr. Honeycut, who is quickly interrupted via video call (insert modern technology joke). General Blanque admonishes him for not producing the results expected for him, or the courtesy of filling out his annual reports. Honeycut doesn’t take the interruption well, and bemoans the idea of his inventions being weapons. Meanwhile, a robot worker named Sal is doing yard work, and Honeycut expresses desire to be just like that, without the pressure of his profession. He hooks up a device called “Mentawave” that allows him to move physical objects with his mind. Before he can remove the head piece, he sees Sal struggling in weeds. A storm begins, and lightning strikes Honeycut and Sal!


Chapter 2: Honeycut drags himself back into his laboratory, only to find his mind has been transferred into the body of Sal. Shortly after, Gen. Blanque arrives, and along with his men, discovers the charred remains of the former Dr. Honeycut, and robot tracks that lead them to Sal. Without so much as an investigation, they open fire on Sal/Honeycut, who makes his escape into the nearby woods.


Chapter 3: Blanque sends two of his men after the robot while he investigates the ransacked laboratory. He comes across a recording device that had been left on, and here’s Honeycut’s exposition about having his mind transferred into the robot. Blanque sees this as an opportunity to use Honeycut for all his desires, and with no hesitation, because robots are looked down upon in this civilization. The new orders are to capture, not destroy, the robot. Honeycut comes across several large rock-like looking piles, only to discover one moves, and turns out to be a giant crab-like monster.


Chapter 4: Blanque’s man give up on their search, and we discover the crustaceans are friendly, and could sense Honeycut’s distress. They inform him of a safer city called Peblak, and a junkyard nearby that will block the sensor’s that could lead Blanque and his troops to his whereabouts. Blanque departs (after repeatedly calling Honeycut “The Fugitoid” a couple of times) and continues to dictate his plans to build a Transmat that will lead to victory against “the cursed” Triceraton Republic, and his own personal glory.


Chapter 5: The Fugitoid/Honeycut makes his way through the junkyard, only he’s not alone. He’s snared by scavengers and taken to Peblak. Meanwhile, Blanque informs his trusted assistant, Lonae, of his plans.


Chapter 6: Honeycut is removed from his transport, in the middle of a busy market place, and put up for auction. He’s eventually sold to a human for 3,100 credits, and “hopefully he does windows, haw haw”. Lonae arrives in a dank part of Peblak, meeting a shadowed figure. He holds the cure to an unknown disease over her head, forcing her to sell her Government’s secrets for the dosage. If she is unwilling to comply, she will die, and the chapter ends with a full-page illustration of a large creature with the head of a Triceratops.


Chapter 7: Dr. Honeycut ditches his human owner and makes a run for it, while the Triceraton leader dictates to his assistant the same goal as Gen. Blanque, except with the desire to destroy his federation, instead. The Triceraton reveals he’s poisoned Lonae’s drugs, leading to her certain death, and vaporizes his assistant, knowing only the Triceraton race can be trusted with the information. Back to Honeycut, he’s finally cornered in an alley with no escape, only for the familiar figures of four Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to materialize, and we’re left with a cliffhanger, to be continued in TMNT #5.


As a stand-alone saga, I thought this could have potential. The title character (or insult, take your pick) is trapped between two sides of a war between the Triceratons and what is assumed to be a Human military. Unfortunately, throwing them all into the mix as a way to advance the Ninja Turtles saga means Fugitoid #2 isn’t really happening as long as they make this part of the TMNT canon, and when it’s over, what’s left? You could say based in a futuristic setting, there’s plenty of room to explore, but as we’ll find out, they wrap things up nicely and leave the entire Triceraton Federation and Fugitoid with a satisfying conclusion. All work is done by Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird, and you’ll notice the illustration closely resembling the work in their partnership in the first dozen or so issues of TMNT. Most of the panels, and even the larger scale images, are well detailed and there’s a lot of stuff going on. Since it stands on it’s own feet (until continuing in TMNT #5), and is roughly a $5-6 comic, it’s a good read.


[The entire saga of the Fugitoid would be used in Season 2 of the 2003 animated series, and it stays mostly faithful to the source material. I'm also not finding anything about Fugitoid being in the original cartoon, so maybe they took the character and tweaked it a bit to give it a more colorful presentation.]
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Erick Von Erich
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Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

July 28th, 2017, 5:01 am #143

I can't remember if it was in "Critters" or some other anthology book, but I know I have a random issue that features a short story of one of the Turtles (want to say Donatello) meeting Usagi Yojimbo at a river crossing. If I could remember what the title was, I'd track it down. I don't think it's canon, as Usagi was feudal Japan and the Turtles were modern day.

Usagi Yojimbo was a title I always wanted to get into, but never did. Even in the early 2000's, I'd pick up an issue every so often.
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Erick Von Erich
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July 28th, 2017, 5:20 am #144

Star Wars #45
Back to Infantino's junk... but he's on his way out. I think they do a series of one-shot stories that have no real bearing on anything. In this one, an Imperial Probe Droid takes over a "blockade runner". It feels dated and similar to their 1979 stuff (circa issue 20 and the Wheel junk).

Yet another scene where Luke floats through space in his pilot suit. They seemed to like that effect for all the characters. Luke also uses his LIGHT SABER..and does so in future issues. Yes, the one that he lost along with his hand! I don't think it was until the new Luke Skywalker "Return of the Jedi" figure and its GREEN light saber came out in early 1983 that we all realized: "hey, Luke lost his YELLOW light saber when he fought Darth Vader in Cloud City"! Marvel's also been inconsistent with the color of everybody's light saber. Luke's has been white, yellow and blue. Again, I think the whole colored light saber thing wasn't really noticeable until "Jedi".

If you strictly follow the movie timeline, Luke doesn't make his new light saber until right before he enters Jabba's palace in "Jedi". That seems a little...late for my liking, though. It all depends on how much time you think passes between "Empire" and "Jedi". Nowadays, it's considered only a few months (or less), but back in the day, the assumption that it was slightly longer than a year. I had the assumption that Luke made his light saber right after "Empire", had some additional adventures while Lando and Chewie were searching for Han, then went to Tattooine after they had all formulated a plan.

Things begin to pick up a bit after issue 50. That's when most of the "Marvel Star Wars" I knew comes along with its darker feel.
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Erick Von Erich
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July 31st, 2017, 5:04 pm #145

Star Wars #46
In a plot device very similar to issue 38, this time it's Lando and Chewie who have a malfunctioning hyperdrive and end up in a different dimension.They meet the "old Rebel hero", Cody Sunn-Childe, who has created a little "dream world" for himself, where everybody lives in peace. The Empire sneaks in and begins attacking. As Lando and Chewie fly away, Sunn-Childe lets his entire world be destroyed and the Imperial Star Destroyer crew is trapped and left to float in the empty dimension.

Once again, it's more of a traditional 60s/70s sci-fi story and doesn't fit Star Wars at all. I think this is one of the last issues for Carmine Infantino, too. Inker Tom Palmer comes back to the book and you can hardly tell it's Infantino's streaky work. Chewbacca finally looks like Chewbacca! I think Palmer sticks around. No matter who he inks, he ends up making it all look the same. If you remember his 80s/90s work on "Avengers", it's very similar.

Funny note in the letters page. The Marvel editor responds to how long they'll be doing "Star Wars" and he replies: "hopefully we'll still be doing it when PART NINE is released in the movies theaters in 2001"! That's not the usual Marvel hype, as NINE SW movies was a widely spread rumor in 1979-1980. For a brief while, I think Lucas even branded his franchise as: "The Adventures of Luke Skywalker" and "Star Wars" was just #1. I don't think it was until 1985 or so that we all realized: "well, I guess Star Wars is done". Even after "Return of the Jedi" there was still an expectation that #4 (or "Episode VII") was on the near horizon.

If we're counting (and we are), it's 2017 and we're only up to 7 SW movies with #8 on the way (9 with Rogue One).
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Erick Von Erich
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Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

August 7th, 2017, 2:54 pm #146

Star Wars #47
Luke and the Droids head to the remote "Droid World" to help analyze an "Imperial Warbot". C-3PO and R2-D2 go at it, alone, on the world, running into a power struggle between the resident droids and their leader-- a cyborg. Very much like a short story you'd find in a sci-fi magazine. Again, it doesn't feel like Star Wars. Oh, and the "Warbot" is like a giant R2-D2 with blades sticking out.

Interesting note in the letters page, as two fans postulate that Princess Leia is the other person Yoda spoke of in "Empire". Not that she's Luke's sister-- just that she might be another "Force-sensitive" person and a possible Jedi. Also the first time I've seen the term "Force-sensitive" being used.

Another fan is upset that Han stole "the woman Luke loves" and that they might have some conflict, in the future.

Star Wars #48
Billed as "Leia vs. Vader", it features both on a diplomatic mission to the central banking planet. Vader has some hired flunkies who look like rejects from a cartoon. Both Leia and Vader act like cheesy sci-fi secret agents, as this is almost like a bad James Bond wannabe. In the end, after several ruses, it turns out that Vader was simply out to steal the "crown jewels of Alderaan". Since this is such a creative issue, we're shown the jewels--- in a standard briefcase, looking like every cartoon depiction of jewelry you've ever seen.

Another story that feels dated and out-of-place. Archie Goodwin; the writer of this shlop since issue 10 or so; is leaving with issue 50. I think this issue is also the last regular Star Wars job for Carmine Infantino. Although I'm guessing he'll pop-up, inconsistently, for the next 12 issues or so. He's a Silver Age legend, but this is probably the nadir of his career.

Another fun letters page, as a fan complains about Luke using his light saber in issue 45. Marvel offers a half-assed explanation, which is that Luke went back to Cloud City and recovered it. Uh-huh.

Odd thing: I've had this book in my collection since 1981, yet never READ it until now. I probably leafed through it, at one point in my youth, but never read it because Leia was the center ("icky girls").
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Erick Von Erich
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Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

August 7th, 2017, 3:09 pm #147

Swamp Thing #72
I'm sure this plot was laid out for us, but they finally spell out what's been happening. When Swamp Thing was "killed" and off-planet, the Parliament of Trees moved to create a replacement. Which is why the sprout/sprite has been floating around. When Swamp Thing came back, they were kinda' in a bind, so decided to kill Swamp Thing.

Sort of a plot hole (for now), but I'm pretty sure the sprout/sprite followed Abby back from her trip to "heaven". So, Constantine and Swamp Thing are running around trying to set things right, or in balance.

In a clever scene, Swamp Thing re-incorporates in the trash bin of an office building-- using potato chips and other processed "veggies".

Also includes a decent, company-wide, editorial from DC publisher Jenette Kahn. She mentions that, as a kid, she read Archie Comics and thought Jughead was "punk". Of note, she mentions that they've licensed-out movie rights for Batman and "Watchmen to 20th Century Fox". This is circa late 1987. Never knew Watchmen was being discussed as a movie, back then. Thought it wasn't until the big super-hero break-through in 2002.
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Erick Von Erich
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August 8th, 2017, 5:55 pm #148

Star Wars #49
Luke and Leia try to restore the forgotten Prince Denid to the throne of his near-medieval world. Luke disguises himself as a bounty hunter named "Korl Marcus", complete with a beret, handle bar mustache, and eye-patch. Leia masquerades as Denid's late wife "Loren" and Denid takes a shine to her, to stir up some jealousy. Denid actually asks Leia to marry him, but that plot is dropped within two pages.

There's also Denid's buddy, Jedidiah---a delusional old alien who thinks he's a Jedi and uses that as his name. Thus the title of this story: "the Last Jedi". There's some political scheming as other members of Denid's family, plus an Imperial (female) officer named Captain Traal get involved. Traal even tries to seduce Luke. Lame ending, as Jedi takes a bullet for Luke. Luke gives him a proper (ejector pod) burial and everybody flies away.

Jedidiah is wearing the remnants of a "Jedi uniform", making him instantly recognizable to Luke. It's similar to what Obi-Wan wore in the flashback story in issue 24.

Another bait-and-switch, as "The Last Jedi" was prominent on the cover. And then, Jedi really didn't do much (except die), as all the focus was on Prince Denid and Luke's masquerade.

One interesting note: the heroes spend "several days" flying in hyper-space. Which makes me wonder: in ALL Star Wars movies, how much time passes when people are flying in hyper-space? I always thought it was a few hours, tops. I suppose "days" could work...and it'd explain some of the timeline inconsistencies of "Empire Strikes Back" (Han and Leia's escapades seem to take about 2-3 days, while Luke seems to be on Dagobah for at least a week, if not two weeks).

Other notes: Walt Simonson comes on as the penciler, teaming with Tom Palmer on inks. I think he did some layouts, much earlier. His distinct style isn't showing, yet. Also, Mike W. BArr wrote this one-shot. He did a bunch of stuff for DC and Marvel in the 80's (among them "Batman & The Outsiders" and "Punisher").
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Mad Dog
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Mad Dog
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Joined: December 10th, 2004, 11:01 pm

August 11th, 2017, 2:06 am #149

The new Mister Miracle #1 was absolutely awesome. High hopes for this series based on the first issue.
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Erick Von Erich
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Joined: May 13th, 2005, 9:06 pm

August 11th, 2017, 2:38 pm #150

Mad Dog,Aug 10 2017 wrote: The new Mister Miracle #1 was absolutely awesome. High hopes for this series based on the first issue.
C'mon now, give us a better reason to check it out. Why was it awesome?

I only ask because Mr. Miracle is usually a VERY tough sell. I'll need something a little more mind-blowing to consider seeking it out.
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