Trans and autism

A place to talk about how to understand and explain 'crossdreaming' and related forms of 'gender variance'
Xora
Joined: 20 Nov 2015, 18:07

12 Oct 2017, 14:17 #121

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docj9000
Joined: 10 Oct 2017, 17:29

12 Oct 2017, 15:33 #122

Xora wrote: Image
Excellent!  As someone who "knows" he has Asperger-Autism but it didn't "exist" when I was young, I can identify with all six panels of the post.
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docj9000
Joined: 10 Oct 2017, 17:29

12 Oct 2017, 15:44 #123

Jen wrote:
April wrote:
Jen, I tend to agree with your comments here, but the autistic spectrum people I have known are as you say very "withdrawn". I always felt rather extroverted. I was always trying to be at the center of the action, and yet I often felt inadequate in regards to that objective. My entire life has been a search for formula that would put me at the middle of things.But until I transitioned, I was always trying to do that as a guy, and things just seemed out sync for me doing it that way. It is just way easier for me to live what I feel by doing it all by a different set of gender rules.
 
April,

The autism spectrum is very broad.  A challenge in sensory processing, hyper and hypo, is just one of the traits.  The others are language challenges and learning issues (high-functioning/low-functioning IQs).  I suspect the guys you met fit the common autists (the withdrawn ones).  We often come across these kids in our schools, but the extroverted ones can still have unusual sensitivity traits and higher-than-average cognitive (learning) abilities, high functioning autists they are known.  
 
I realize this is an old post, but I wanted to comment on it because I totally agree with Jen's comment.  Although I am confident that I would have been diagnosed as having Asperger's if it had been "discovered" when I was growing up, I am viewed by many people as being an extrovert.  Actually, this is far from the truth.  Someone I was close to came up with the concept of "introverts leading extrovert lives" which very much encapsulates what my life has been like.  I'm a loner (primarily because I don't easily make male friends) but if I choose to get involved in something I present as a leader and have been the president of numerous civic organizations, a corporate executive, etc.  Although I have played these roles well it is very much "role playing."  For example, there is nothing I detest more than making small talk at a business cocktail party with people I barely know and don't really want to talk to; I'd rather read a book or watch Netflix!  As for my success in all these "high profile roles", it simply goes to show that "girls can do anything!"  😂
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Xora
Joined: 20 Nov 2015, 18:07

12 Oct 2017, 15:55 #124

Yes, exactly. I'm sure there are lots more of us than we probably think, and the best adapted learned how to
blend in so well at an early age that hardly anyone would suspect what's really going on underneath.
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docj9000
Joined: 10 Oct 2017, 17:29

12 Oct 2017, 16:18 #125

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jackmolay
Joined: 16 Nov 2015, 19:24

13 Oct 2017, 08:38 #126

There is a basic misunderstanding of evolution underpinning much of this. The idea seems to be that evolution creates people who are optimally fit to rule the world in some kind of race towards "normal perfection".

The evolution of Homo Sapiens, however, in no way supports this narrative. The fact that we have adapted to environments as different as the Sahara desert and the ice of Greenland, tells us that it is diversity that makes us succeed.

This is a question of group selection, not the selection of individuals. Since a society (as a tribe) may suddenly face a different environment, having a wide variety of personality types and abilities makes that group more resilient. Some people are better at solving some problems, other are good at something else. 

As far as I see it, neuroatypicals of most shades and variations benefit society, because they are able to solve problems those closer to the centre of the bell curve are not.

By the way, there are no normal people, only people who desperately try to pretend to be normal.
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Xora
Joined: 20 Nov 2015, 18:07

08 Nov 2017, 12:40 #127

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Fabienne
Joined: 16 Apr 2017, 20:06

09 Nov 2017, 10:36 #128

Good article. I love how the writer payed attention to Wallace's poetic patterns alongside everything else.
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Xora
Joined: 20 Nov 2015, 18:07

09 Nov 2017, 15:07 #129

Of course there is always an opposition view..



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April
Joined: 17 Nov 2015, 16:32

09 Nov 2017, 19:05 #130

Xora wrote: Of course there is always an opposition view..



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Yes, the 4th wave crowd. With them, autism is the diagnosis of choice. I wonder how many of those kids are really autistic, and how many of those are the result of parents shopping for an anything but trans diagnosis, and then attempting to use that diagnosis to invalidate a trans identity.
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