The whole depersonalization and gender dysphoria thingy

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The whole depersonalization and gender dysphoria thingy

oreb
Joined: 14 May 2017, 21:32

07 Sep 2017, 23:48 #1

So for those of you who still haven't heard about it, an article by Zinnia Jones came out some time ago on dissociation as a pervasive and often ignored symptom of gender dysphoria. I seem to remember mjperry96 opened a thread about the subject some time ago, but I cannot find it for some reason. Anyway, I think the topic definitely deserves a separate discussion (ni whichever thread).
Here is the article:
https://genderanalysis.net/2017/06/depe ... ecognized/

My first question is: what do all of the experiences listed in the article have in common? When comparing some of them it's like apples and oranges at first glance.
Last edited by oreb on 15 Sep 2017, 12:56, edited 1 time in total.
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Dawn
Joined: 27 Jul 2017, 08:02

08 Sep 2017, 05:21 #2

I dunno. I could relate to some of these if I really wanted to try to... but I don't think they quite fit me. I was more like this before waking up: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schizoid_ ... y_disorder
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April
Joined: 17 Nov 2015, 16:32

08 Sep 2017, 05:43 #3

I tend to think that instead of being disconnected from my feelings, I felt at times overwhelmed by them to the point of discomfort. 
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Fabienne
Joined: 16 Apr 2017, 20:06

08 Sep 2017, 08:13 #4

I can find myself in the majority of these "symptoms". In some way it may be detachment from emotions or I think it's probably more in line with my experiences to say it's avoidance of the overwhelming sense of them, like trying to force a gallon of water through a straw at high pressure, and since it can't effectively be expressed one just shuts down and lets it build up inside instead, leaving no space for further emotions as a result. What they have in common is I think a separation between the internal and external worlds, which therefore limits or fully negates access to one's whole personality.
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Barbara Haskell
Joined: 14 Sep 2016, 12:12

08 Sep 2017, 12:32 #5

I'm able to relate my past only to detachment from emotions and to barrier, which separated me from the world. Being empty was a symptom of detachment, plus it was a general emptiness of life, lack of purpose.

Also, considered the possibility, that I had Schizoid Personality Disorder, but after long analysis, came to conclusion, that it's not the same thing, but very similar. For me, SPD sounds like an usual behavior of INTP.
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Lindsay
Joined: 18 Nov 2015, 18:05

08 Sep 2017, 15:12 #6

The article pretty much exactly describes my experiences. Before discovering hormones I always felt that I was just an observer of my life. Like I was trapped in a box with only a small hole to look out of as some stranger lived my life for me. I didn’t even recognize the person who was leading my life and was often amazed at the things he did and said.

Starting on hormones was an instantly transformational experience. My dysphoria evaporated. It was like I was immediately released from the box and I could see the life This guy was living was a false construct, just something I had built up to hide from the reality of who I really was.

One of the things she said in the article really resonated with me, and that was about crying. Before hormones I never cried, but now I kind of look forward to it. The emotional release is almost sexual in feeling.


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Lindsay

"The thing is you see what you want to see and you hear what you want to hear, dig?" the Pointed Man
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Deborah Kate
Joined: 26 Nov 2015, 21:58

10 Sep 2017, 16:30 #7

the danger with this sort of thinking, at least in terms of mild indirect dysphoria, is a presumption that cislife is easy, meaningful and happy - that if you don't find life like that, you must be transsexual. but how many cispeople really find life easy, meaningful and happy? xx
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oreb
Joined: 14 May 2017, 21:32

11 Sep 2017, 22:52 #8

Well said, Deborah.
I didn't break the words! I am the words!!
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April
Joined: 17 Nov 2015, 16:32

11 Sep 2017, 23:42 #9

My prior life wasn't really all that miserable. Yes, I had had bouts with dysphoria, but I probably could have dealt with that, just as I had many times before. Not everything  in my life had gone perfectly to plan, but I had a career with a fair amount of impressive accomplishments, and I was married to a rather beautiful woman. For me, the critical watershed moment was having cancer and facing my own mortality. In such moments, one thinks about the road not traveled, and I didn't want to die without exploring that possibility. It was more of a "why not" moment. But I tend to be flippant.  
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Lindsay
Joined: 18 Nov 2015, 18:05

11 Sep 2017, 23:48 #10

Debs I don’t think the article said that if you show these symptoms you ARE transsexual. It was more in the lines that you might be:

“Depersonalization symptoms can also occur in the context of untreated gender dysphoria, yet this is not widely recognized among the public or in most literature on transness and transitioning.”

The article seemed clear that transgendered people can share a lot of the symptoms of depersonalization but just because you have them doesn’t make you trans





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Lindsay

"The thing is you see what you want to see and you hear what you want to hear, dig?" the Pointed Man
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