51 - These are my symptoms....

51 - These are my symptoms....

Joined: March 30th, 2009, 12:03 pm

March 31st, 2009, 3:35 pm #1

Here goes....
I'm 51 and think I'm pregnant. If so, am blessed and welcome the change in life. Frankly, at first, I thought it was the beginning of the change OF life. Missed a period, had a period. Now, it's been six months since I've had a period. Took three stick tests - all negative, within the last 60 days.

However, my belly is getting bigger and bigger and I feel movement - and have for a while, thus the pg tests. My health is fabulous and I've got this 'glow'. In retrospect:
1. Ate tons of peanuts - still do (folic acid)
2. Steady Periods and regular til... they stopped
3. Had some nausea - but nothing violent for a few days
4. Have 4 jars of pickle juice (only) from a 2 month craving time
5. Feel like I've got a fist in my tummy - which is now pushing on the wasteline of everything I own - while elsewhere there's baggy-ness (Have lost 50 pounds in the past year).

I've never been married - nor pregnant, though I've 'faked myself out' on non-pregnancies in the past (2X).

I've searched the net and found many 'I didn't even know I was pregnant' stories - so I know every symptom doesn't have to be present.

Going to the psychic tomorrow and scheduling an ultrasound. Not even into modern medicine's way of much - so seeking a midwife. Any advice, questions,comments?
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Joined: May 6th, 2003, 12:18 am

April 1st, 2009, 11:30 pm #2


You need to get to an ob/gyn, quickly.  You need to have a quantitative beta-hcg level drawn quickly and have a complete examination.  Call around and see who you can get into in the next couple of days, this isn't something you should be waiting around for.  If it turns out you are pregnant, you can decide if you want a midwife to provide your care, but if it's something else, you need to know now.

As your can see from the table, after the first few weeks of pregnancy, the hcg level should be high enough for any home pregnancy test to be positive.


<table width="95%" border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="3"><tr><td colspan="2">
hCG levels during pregnancy
(in weeks since last menstrual period)

</td></tr><tr><td width="49%"><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">3 weeks LMP</strong></font></td><td width="51%">
<strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">5 - 50 mIU/ml </strong></font>
</td></tr><tr><td width="49%"><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">4 weeks LMP</strong></font></td><td width="51%">
<strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">5 - 426 mIU/ml </strong></font>
</td></tr><tr><td width="49%"><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">5 weeks LMP</strong></font></td><td width="51%"><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">18 - 7,340 mIU/ml </strong></font></td></tr><tr><td width="49%"><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">6 weeks LMP</strong></font></td><td width="51%"><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">1,080 - 56,500 mIU/ml </strong></font></td></tr><tr><td><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">7 - 8 weeks LMP</strong></font></td><td><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">7, 650 - 229,000 mIU/ml </strong></font></td></tr><tr><td><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">9 - 12 weeks LMP</strong></font></td><td><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">25,700 - 288,000 mIU/ml </strong></font></td></tr><tr><td><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">13 - 16 weeks LMP</strong></font></td><td><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">13,300 - 254,000 mIU/ml </strong></font></td></tr><tr><td><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">17 - 24 weeks LMP</strong></font></td><td><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">4,060 - 165,400 mIU/ml </strong></font></td></tr><tr><td><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">25 - 40 weeks LMP</strong></font></td><td><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">3,640 - 117,000 mIU/ml </strong></font></td></tr><tr><td width="49%"><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">non pregnant </strong></font></td><td width="51%"><strong><font face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">55-200 ng/ml</strong></font></td></tr></table>
Please let us know the results.


<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://network54.com/Realm/Mature_Mater ... yboard.gif">
Annie
Last edited by AnnieNemus on April 1st, 2009, 11:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: March 30th, 2009, 12:03 pm

April 2nd, 2009, 3:14 am #3

Thanks for your response Annie. Is the test you refer to a blood test for hcg levels? If so, the local doc will do that test, and a 'visit' for like $98.00. He's not an obgyn - otherwise, I can get a ride 1 + hours from here and get an ultrasound by a Firstcare establishment.

The psychic said fibroids or yeast. But no pain - no bleeding of any kind. No discharge or itch or uncomfortableness in that way.

Gotta tell you, I'm somewhat freaked out about the modern medicine route. I don't want to expose the fetus to soundwaves buzzing. I'm not into being poked and/or proded. Fresh air, good food, walking. But yes, the ultrasound would confirm.

In the olden olden days just having your period stop and your belly get big would be enough.

Thank you,
LoriAnne
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Joined: May 6th, 2003, 12:18 am

April 2nd, 2009, 11:57 am #4


The quantatative beta-hcg will give a number to the human chorionic gonadatropin level. 

Sadly, even that doesn't assure a pregnancy as their are some tumors which produce this hormone.  While your local GP may be adequate to draw a blood level, s/he isn't really trained in all the nuances of gynecology, so a real gynecologist is what you need.

"In the olden olden days just having your period stop and your belly get big would be enough."
Yes, this is true, and sadly some of those women died of reproductive tract cancer because everyone just assumed that they were pregnant.  Or they had a complicated pregnancy that ended in the death of both the fetus and the mother.  It used to be that up to half the women who got pregnant died either during pregnancy and delivery or shortly thereafter. 

You need realize that "modern medicine" isn't out to get you, but there to help you.  There are things about this situation that just don't add up.  You haven't had a period in six months.  You say you've got a growing something inside and feel movement, and yet you still have a negative home pregnancy test.  Women normally wouldn't feel movement in a first pregnancy until somewhere between 18-22 weeks.  At that time, a home pregnancy test should be so positive that there's no question that it's positive.

Please, you need to get to a gynecologist to see what's going on.  If you have a growing mass, it needs to be diagnosed.



Annie
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Joined: March 30th, 2009, 12:03 pm

April 2nd, 2009, 4:06 pm #5

I appreciate everything you are saying to me Annie and intend to go for the ultrasound - I'm sure they'll start a file on me and want to do a bunch of other things to help. So...

The only thing I have a problem with is the 1/2 of women died in childbirth. That number seems incredibly high.

I guess the poking and proding and blood-taking, and probing and week by week monitoring and blood pressure taking and temperature taking and all that, plus appointments (waiting and waiting in the lobby with folks that might actually BE sick) - la la la la la - great aversions.

Of course, I guess I'd do it for a baby - but if it is something else that might kill me - I think I'd rather drift toward the other non-medical direction.

I'll let you know. Thank you for everything.


LA
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Joined: May 6th, 2003, 12:18 am

April 2nd, 2009, 7:15 pm #6

<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Maternal death</span><span>, or maternal mortality, also "obstetrical death" is the death of a woman during or shortly after a pregnancy. <span>  </span><?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>

<span>According to the WHO, "A maternal death is defined as the death of a woman while pregnant or within 42 days of termination of pregnancy, irrespective of the duration and site of the pregnancy, from any cause related to or aggravated by the pregnancy or its management but not from accidental or incidental causes." [1]</span>

<span>Generally there is a distinction between a direct maternal death that is the result of a complication of the pregnancy, delivery, or their management, and an indirect maternal death that is a pregnancy-related death in a patient with a preexisting or newly developed health problem. Other fatalities during but unrelated to a pregnancy are termed accidental, incidental, or nonobstetrical maternal deaths.</span>

<span>Maternal mortality is a sentinel event to assess the quality of a health care system. However, a number of issues need to be recognized. First of all, the WHO definition is one of many; other definitions may also include accidental and incidental causes. Cases with "incidental causes" include deaths secondary to violence against women that may be related to the pregnancy and be affected by the socioeconomic and cultural environment. Also, it has been reported that about 10% of maternal deaths may occur late, that is after 42 days after a termination or delivery[2], thus, some definitions extend the time period of observation to one year after the end of the gestation. Further, it is well recognized that maternal mortality numbers are often significantly underreported [3]. <span> </span>This may be due to lack of reporting of terminations and lack of social recognition of the pregnancy.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Dr. Ignaz Semmelweis worked at the Vienna General Hospital's maternity clinic on a 3-year contract from 1846-1849. There, as elsewhere in European and North American hospitals, puerperal fever, or childbed fever, was rampant, sometimes climbing to 40 percent of admitted patients.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>"Lifetime risk of maternal death" accounts for number of pregnancies and risk. <span> </span></span>The estimated risk of an individual woman dying from pregnancy or childbirth during her lifetime, based on maternal mortality and the fertility rate in the country. <span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">For a woman who had two deliveries in those Vienna Hospital during the 1846-1849 period, she had about an 80% chance of dying.  In reality, without any form of birth control, many women had far greater numbers of pregnancies.  Historically, it was not uncommon for many men to marry two or three different women in their lifetimes, after deaths of their earlier wives, usually in or around childbirth.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<ol>[*]<span><a>http://www.cahr.info/index_files/page0023.htm</a></span> href="http://www.cahr.info/index_files/page00 ... n>Maternal Mortality in Central Asia</span>, <span>Central Asia Health Review</span> (CAHR), 2 June, 2008 </li>[*]<span>Koonin, Lisa M.; Hani K. Atrash, Roger W. Rochat, Jack C. Smith (12/1/1988). "Maternal Mortality Surveillance, United States, 19801985". MMWR 37 (SS-5): 1929. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwR/preview/mmwrhtml/00001754.htm.<span> </span> </span></li>[*]<span>Deneux-Tharaux, D; Berg C, Bouvier-Colle MH, Gissler M, Harper M, Nannini A, Alexander S, Wildman K, Breart G, Buekens P. (2005). "Underreporting of Pregnancy-Related Mortality in the United States and Europe". Obstet Gynecol 106: 684692.<span> </span> </span></li>[*]<span>Semmelweis (1861) p152</span></li>[/list]<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>"I guess the poking and proding and blood-taking, and probing and week by week monitoring and blood pressure taking and temperature taking and all that, plus appointments (waiting and waiting in the lobby with folks that might actually BE sick) - la la la la la - great aversions. "</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>My experience was far different from what you describe, and my pregnancy was considered high-risk.  I had blood taken only a few times.  My appointments were no where near weekly.  My blood pressure, a small urine sample  and my fundal height (using a measuring tape to measure how high the uterus was) were done at each appointment, but I didn't have internal examinations but once before being in the hospital.  As for waiting and waiting in the lobby, I don't remember waiting more than 15 or 20 minutes at any appointments, and certainly don't remember others there coughing and sniffling.  </span>



Annie
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Joined: March 30th, 2009, 12:03 pm

April 2nd, 2009, 9:55 pm #7

I appreciate it, really! Thank YOU!
Will let you know what the ultrasound says.
Sincerely,
LA
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