Rocker stud torque / rocker sealant (defeating engine smoke)

Rocker stud torque / rocker sealant (defeating engine smoke)

Joined: July 23rd, 2002, 1:02 am

February 23rd, 2011, 12:51 pm #1

Two questions: (1) What are the torque specs for ARP 7/16" rocker studs into cast iron heads? (2) What do you guys use to seal your screw-in rocker studs that protrude into the intake ports? And is there no need to use loctite too / or / instead of sealant?

I'm going to try either: (a) Permatex 80015 Form-A-Gasket #2 Sealant
http://www.amazon.com/Permatex-80015-Fo ... 732&sr=8-1
b) Permatex 59214 High Temperature Thread Sealant?
http://www.amazon.com/Permatex-59214-Te ... 785&sr=1-1

I believe oil seeping past my rocker studs has been the cause of my engine smoking problem for the past year -- I'll report back in my original thread and give credit where credit is due after I seal 'em all up.

Many thanks, gentlemen.

Chris in TX

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Joined: January 10th, 2002, 5:53 pm

February 23rd, 2011, 5:21 pm #2

I use 45 ft/lbs and loctite but never had one drilled and tapped into the intake port. Blue loctite or teflon pipe seal should more than seal the threads.

1967 Falcon 4 door 351C-4V
1970 Mustang 351C-2V
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Owner built, owner abused.
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Joined: July 23rd, 2002, 1:02 am

February 23rd, 2011, 6:10 pm #3

Thanks, Chris! Hope all is well. Yeah... I was surprised to find it was drilled all the way through, too. Anyone around to soccer kick me in the nads for not investigating this (as suggested by a few of you) a year ago?

I'm anxious to see how many holed were machined all the way through. And I'm way anxious to see when I seal all 8 holes if my smokin' 408 stops blue clouding.

Curious what the rest of yous are using for sealant. My Pontiac neighbor who convinced me to pull one of the studs swears by white Permatex liquid teflon.
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Joined: February 3rd, 2003, 5:22 pm

February 23rd, 2011, 6:47 pm #4

Last edited by machoneman on February 25th, 2011, 3:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 22nd, 2007, 8:41 pm

February 23rd, 2011, 7:38 pm #5

Years ago I found this product in of all places, a hardware store. It's called "TiteSeal Gasket and joint Compound"! It seals oil, gas, high pressure steam and water. It doesn't harden. Here's the label info from the can. of all the automotive sealers on the market i have yet to find one as versatile as this one. And it's cheap, the last can I bought was $3.00 and change!


No. 55 Gasket & joint Sealing Compound;
The flexible, non-hardening, leakproof seal for machined joints and gasket applications. The dry TITESEAL will form permanent , non-leaking seals at temperatures from -50deg F to +500 deg F. It seals leaks at gas pressure as great as 15,000psi and fluid pressure as high as 25,000psi, when used as directed. Flash point 300deg F., TOC>160degF. boiling point>180deg F.
TITESEAL No.55 is a special liquid density prepared for easy application. Excellent for leak-proofing threaded, flanged, and all other assembly line connection work. Used to seal gaskets or threads on equipment or lines pumping acids or alkalis (up to 30%), aliphatic solvents, oils, glycols, sugars, fuels,etc. Will seal in all gasses except oxygen.
TITESEAL is unaffected by water, oil, gasoline, ammonia, glycerine, steam, gas vapor, and most hard-to-hold liquids. Withstands extreme temperatures, will not shrink, crack or crumble. Remains pliable for easy disassembly.
TITESEAL remains pliable and will not harden, making connections vibration proof and easy to disassemble for repairs and adjustments. Prevents corrosion and "freezing" of metal parts.



The Older I get......The faster I WAS!
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Joined: December 17th, 2003, 4:14 pm

February 23rd, 2011, 7:58 pm #6

Lol I think I inherited a can of that from my grandpa's old garage. Sounds like good stuff, I'll have to go look for it.
Last edited by TwoTab on February 23rd, 2011, 8:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: July 23rd, 2002, 1:02 am

February 23rd, 2011, 8:22 pm #7

I've got a few tubes of this left over from the multiple intake gasket install. Anyone use hylomar?

(thanks to everyone who responded! great stuff that will help others)
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Joined: February 3rd, 2003, 5:22 pm

February 25th, 2011, 12:02 am #8

but it will work. Keep in mind you're only sealing threads on deeply engaged threads, not keeping the Titanic afloat!
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Joined: June 12th, 2009, 1:31 pm

February 25th, 2011, 1:38 am #9

I've got a few tubes of this left over from the multiple intake gasket install. Anyone use hylomar?

(thanks to everyone who responded! great stuff that will help others)
Just plane old blue loc-tite 242 or 243 will work if you use enough to coat the threads.
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Joined: July 26th, 2002, 1:52 am

February 25th, 2011, 1:41 am #10

I've got a few tubes of this left over from the multiple intake gasket install. Anyone use hylomar?

(thanks to everyone who responded! great stuff that will help others)
but not much hylomar anymore because it's real thin loctite 515 is my favorite , and it has bested many other compounds . but I dont use any anearobics on studs . I use these anearobics on cases and stuff not threads.

For threads red loctite or blue should be fine but the ordinary compounds require a VERY clean dry surface until they have FULLY cured or they dont do anything and gasoline exposure from below may defeat conventional thread lockers anyway .green loctite "sleeve and bearing" compound stays sticky for a very long time, on a carb where it is obviously exposed to gas, but I have been using 222ms , ms stands for mil-spec it stays sticky from here on out .

"The Japanese had already rounded up the cow trailers so we had to build horsepower"

Gary Robison
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