Look for Cleveland Article Tomorrow on cleveland.com

Look for Cleveland Article Tomorrow on cleveland.com

Joined: December 19th, 2008, 2:01 pm

May 3rd, 2012, 4:26 pm #1

Not sure if anyone else has already posted about this but I think some of you may have been contacted, as I was. I just got off the phone with Robert Schoenberger who is an automotive reporter for cleveland.com. Seems the Cleveland foundry where the 351C was made from is shutting down for good tomorrow. Robert is writing an article about this and our beloved. I gave him all I could about Cleveland's (mostly my passion) but had the good sense to think of George Pence, who I do not know directly but know enough to know a guru on the engines we love when I see (read) one! So I have referred Robert to George, hope he connects with George.

In any case, be on the lookout for an article on www.cleveland.com tomorrow!

Exciting! (and sad at the same time)

Regards,

Bob
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Joined: January 16th, 2012, 4:02 pm

May 3rd, 2012, 5:35 pm #2

with Robert about this. I had the good fortune to tour the facility a few years back. V-8 blocks were coming out of shake-out every 39 seconds at the end of the line. Wow! I'd just like to get one cast every 39 days. Ofcourse I haven't invested a billion dollars yet either.

Tod
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Joined: September 13th, 2007, 7:49 pm

May 3rd, 2012, 10:07 pm #3

Not sure if anyone else has already posted about this but I think some of you may have been contacted, as I was. I just got off the phone with Robert Schoenberger who is an automotive reporter for cleveland.com. Seems the Cleveland foundry where the 351C was made from is shutting down for good tomorrow. Robert is writing an article about this and our beloved. I gave him all I could about Cleveland's (mostly my passion) but had the good sense to think of George Pence, who I do not know directly but know enough to know a guru on the engines we love when I see (read) one! So I have referred Robert to George, hope he connects with George.

In any case, be on the lookout for an article on www.cleveland.com tomorrow!

Exciting! (and sad at the same time)

Regards,

Bob
I sent him an e-mail and also refered him to George. I don't know of many others with George's passion and knowlege for the Clevelands in their purest form (factory parts etc.....)
I am very sad to hear that the plant is closing. I thought they were building the new 5.0 Cyotte there. Shows how much I know about the new Fords other than they are sure fast!
I will be watching for the artical.
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Joined: March 12th, 2002, 2:39 pm

May 3rd, 2012, 11:45 pm #4

This guy should keep to lecturing......

"James Marion, a professor emeritus of history at Indiana University, said rising gas prices and higher insurance rates killed the gas-guzzling muscle cars almost overnight in the early 1970s.

The massive 1971 Mustang only lasted three years before being replaced by the Mustang II, a front-wheel-drive car that used four-cylinder and six-cylinder engines. Though reviled by Mustang enthusiasts, the Mustang II kept that vehicle's name alive while GM dropped the Camaro and Dodge abandoned the Charger and Challenger.

"It was those Baby Boomers coming of age in the 1960s feeding that muscle car culture," Marion said. He added that most of the Boomers were too old for muscle cars by the 1970s, and demand for big engines was already falling when Ford began building the Cleveland."

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Joined: July 24th, 2008, 10:06 pm

May 4th, 2012, 7:55 am #5

At least he should make sure what he writes is true, The only Front wheel drive that was supposed to be a mustang was killed before it could be named a mustang, that was the Probe and were is it now. Although the Mustang II was far from a performance car It did keep Mustang alive and ford sold more than 1000,000 of them in 4 years.
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Joined: December 23rd, 2004, 3:26 pm

May 4th, 2012, 11:28 am #6

This guy should keep to lecturing......

"James Marion, a professor emeritus of history at Indiana University, said rising gas prices and higher insurance rates killed the gas-guzzling muscle cars almost overnight in the early 1970s.

The massive 1971 Mustang only lasted three years before being replaced by the Mustang II, a front-wheel-drive car that used four-cylinder and six-cylinder engines. Though reviled by Mustang enthusiasts, the Mustang II kept that vehicle's name alive while GM dropped the Camaro and Dodge abandoned the Charger and Challenger.

"It was those Baby Boomers coming of age in the 1960s feeding that muscle car culture," Marion said. He added that most of the Boomers were too old for muscle cars by the 1970s, and demand for big engines was already falling when Ford began building the Cleveland."
How do they come up with such conclusions? connecting the dots with a wood chipper?kinda makes you wonder what other things professors of history are teaching your kids, doesn't it? Next, they'll make him dean of the school of journalism.
b
Last edited by hardbopper on May 4th, 2012, 11:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 16th, 2012, 4:02 pm

May 4th, 2012, 12:02 pm #7

with Robert about this. I had the good fortune to tour the facility a few years back. V-8 blocks were coming out of shake-out every 39 seconds at the end of the line. Wow! I'd just like to get one cast every 39 days. Ofcourse I haven't invested a billion dollars yet either.

Tod
I waste time talking with newspaper people. When you are actually involved in the discussion, and see what the end result is, it does not help bolster one's opinion of reporters. Apparently I have had nothing to do with Cleveland engines. Whatever. Onward and upward.

Tod
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Joined: December 19th, 2008, 2:01 pm

May 4th, 2012, 12:12 pm #8

Not sure if anyone else has already posted about this but I think some of you may have been contacted, as I was. I just got off the phone with Robert Schoenberger who is an automotive reporter for cleveland.com. Seems the Cleveland foundry where the 351C was made from is shutting down for good tomorrow. Robert is writing an article about this and our beloved. I gave him all I could about Cleveland's (mostly my passion) but had the good sense to think of George Pence, who I do not know directly but know enough to know a guru on the engines we love when I see (read) one! So I have referred Robert to George, hope he connects with George.

In any case, be on the lookout for an article on www.cleveland.com tomorrow!

Exciting! (and sad at the same time)

Regards,

Bob
http://www.cleveland.com/business/index ... ngine.html

Guess since I got a mention and quoted it is easier for me to just be happy about the whole thing, except for another American manufacturing plant closing...

"Bob Entwistle, an electrical engineer in New Jersey, said he owned a 1970 Mercury Cougar with a 351 Cleveland when he was in high school in the late 1970s.

"Everybody else ran Chevys because they were so accessible. And I would race them and make them sad," Entwistle said.

He loved the engine so much that he's putting one in a 1969 Cougar that he's restoring, even though that car originally came with a much different engine."

So not only is the engine a true "talisman" (it is that same block from when I was 17) but I/it got an honorable mention. I'm thrilled.

Bob

P.S. I too would have liked to see George utilized as a resource, but I got the message at work overnight on Wednesday, spoke to Robert midday Thursday (and referred him to George), but the article (and plant closing) was/is today. Deadlines, 'ya know. Perhaps if Robert had started earlier...
Last edited by rentwist on May 4th, 2012, 6:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 17th, 2004, 11:02 pm

May 4th, 2012, 5:22 pm #9

Not sure if anyone else has already posted about this but I think some of you may have been contacted, as I was. I just got off the phone with Robert Schoenberger who is an automotive reporter for cleveland.com. Seems the Cleveland foundry where the 351C was made from is shutting down for good tomorrow. Robert is writing an article about this and our beloved. I gave him all I could about Cleveland's (mostly my passion) but had the good sense to think of George Pence, who I do not know directly but know enough to know a guru on the engines we love when I see (read) one! So I have referred Robert to George, hope he connects with George.

In any case, be on the lookout for an article on www.cleveland.com tomorrow!

Exciting! (and sad at the same time)

Regards,

Bob
> I think some of you may have been contacted, as I was.

I was also contacted and quoted in the article. Some of the quotes I
actually said during the phone interview but I have no idea where some
of them came from. Disappointed there was no mention of the Pantera.

Dan Jones
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Joined: January 16th, 2012, 4:02 pm

May 4th, 2012, 6:15 pm #10

I brought up Panteras in my extensive email interview, but apparently they don't rate. I find it interesting that a company in Maryland is mentioned in passing with no name, which I assume is MME. Mark had Robert contact me. They must not expect much interest in the article.

Tod
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