Lifter Bore Bushing oil holes

Lifter Bore Bushing oil holes

Joined: July 12th, 2008, 1:55 pm

May 22nd, 2011, 8:50 am #1

Hey Guys, I just finished reaming my lifter bores with Winks kit. For a predominatly street vehicle, what would you guys recommend the oil hole size to be? Will have solid flat tappet cam and Crower cool face lifters with the 0.024" hole as well.. The instructions say 0.043" was good for Pro stock applications, but they don't run for long! I wonder how much the valvesprings would like?
Cheers.
Last edited by gs351 on May 22nd, 2011, 8:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 5th, 2004, 11:36 pm

May 22nd, 2011, 9:58 pm #2

With a bit of luck Wink will chime in on this. Ive done 4 blocks with winks kit, 3 race only with the 43 thou holes (one of them big solid roller).

The other one that does a fair bit of street time we went with 060 holes in the bushes (went with 060 as it was mentioned in the how to build sbf book). The build is more race than street but its done several thousand HARD street k's, flat tappet, mid 260's @ 050, 400pnds on the nose. Grouted block, big 3+" bearing clearances. Didnt use cool face lifters.

This thing isnt mine and I havent checked spring pressures since it left here,but if there were a problem this guy would find it. NO mechanical sympathy. With the 060 hole, grouted block and big clearances it suffers low 25pnd oil pressure at idle, but is showing no other problems. Oil filters are clean. Youtube below is of the owner with a previous engine, this one gets the same treatment.....but with more revs:)

language warning http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8VfbtjKqvs

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Joined: December 16th, 2003, 1:59 am

May 22nd, 2011, 11:25 pm #3

i'm feeling maybe .080" when i do mine, i just want to control the oil not starve it. gotta be a far cry tighter than the stock exposure in the galleys

good point on oiling the springs for street/endurance, seems that if they don't get enough oil they'll smoke what they do get and the guides will suffer worse

there'll be phantoms, there'll be fires on the road... and the white man dancing
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Joined: November 15th, 2008, 5:31 pm

May 23rd, 2011, 12:23 am #4

When I did mine, the holes are .040 and no troubles; solid rollers.
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Joined: August 28th, 2002, 6:51 pm

May 23rd, 2011, 12:34 am #5

I did mine a couple years ago. I went with 0.046" holes. Street/strip engine, Crower solid roller lifters.
No issues so far.
Danford1
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Joined: October 1st, 2004, 8:05 pm

May 23rd, 2011, 12:59 am #6

Food for thought

Dyno Don ran 0.035" orifices .... Pro Stock Racing
Ford's bushing kit supplied bushings with 0.060" orifices ... geared for NASCAR Racing
If 0.060" is good enough for NASCAR racing, its more than enough for the street

I'm a street engine type of guy, I've installed push rods with 0.040" restrictions in several street motors
I was told the push rod restrictors metered oil more or less equivalent to the Boss 351 solid lifters (made by Johnson)
Boss 351 solid lifters were good for the street, endurance racing, drag racing, etc

The oem 351C hydraulic lifters were also designed to meter oil to some degree
I never learned who the manufacturer of the oem hydraulic lifters was, but I suspected Johnson because ...
The aftermarket Johnson hydraulic lifters were the only lifters which claimed to be "Cleveland compatible"
(meaning they meter oil properly for a Cleveland, and indicating Johnson understood this was necessary)
Not completely believing that was enough, I still used restricted push rods even though I always used Ford or Johnson lifters

and a question ....

Doesn't the location of the oil drain hole in Cleveland heads trap enough oil in the valve covers to create a pool of oil that partially submerges the exhaust springs? The location and size of that drain hole was just as intentional as the rest of the design.

-G
____________________________________________________________

Pantera Photos | 351C Historic Information | 351C Technical Information

If you use a 351C 4V powered vehicle for a grocery getter ... the eggs aren't going to make it home!
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Joined: May 7th, 2005, 1:24 am

May 23rd, 2011, 2:01 am #7

I didn't want to chime in too early because I wanted to read everyone's experience. I think that a .050 to .060 hole might be big enough but I can only guess because I have only put about 25 miles on my street engine with the bushings. When I first started using bushings in race blocks, a guy named Fred Flagle did my first block. He used to be Bob Gliddens only hired helper back in 1978 when Bob went the entire season undefeated. He put .025 oil holes in those bushings but I had trouble with some of the pushrods getting enough oil so I went to an .040 hole and never had any problems after that.

www.lifterboretools.com
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Joined: July 12th, 2008, 1:55 pm

May 23rd, 2011, 9:09 am #8

Some great info there, thanks alot. I think I will go 0.060" with mine.. I'd rather a bit more than not enough I suppose.. If as George said, Ford used 0.060" for Nascar spec? That's good enough for my junk! I drilled a 0.046" hole in one of the bushes last night, and couldn't believe how small it looked!I have seen a picture on here of Danfords showing the oil coming through the bushings with that size hole though, and there looks to be quite a bit..Also saw Your video on Youtube before I bought my kit Dan. That Capri certainly is an Animal! I've seen that run a few time before, the shift light glowing continually in the burnout box! Awesome..
Cheers all.
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Joined: July 12th, 2008, 1:55 pm

May 23rd, 2011, 9:14 am #9

Food for thought

Dyno Don ran 0.035" orifices .... Pro Stock Racing
Ford's bushing kit supplied bushings with 0.060" orifices ... geared for NASCAR Racing
If 0.060" is good enough for NASCAR racing, its more than enough for the street

I'm a street engine type of guy, I've installed push rods with 0.040" restrictions in several street motors
I was told the push rod restrictors metered oil more or less equivalent to the Boss 351 solid lifters (made by Johnson)
Boss 351 solid lifters were good for the street, endurance racing, drag racing, etc

The oem 351C hydraulic lifters were also designed to meter oil to some degree
I never learned who the manufacturer of the oem hydraulic lifters was, but I suspected Johnson because ...
The aftermarket Johnson hydraulic lifters were the only lifters which claimed to be "Cleveland compatible"
(meaning they meter oil properly for a Cleveland, and indicating Johnson understood this was necessary)
Not completely believing that was enough, I still used restricted push rods even though I always used Ford or Johnson lifters

and a question ....

Doesn't the location of the oil drain hole in Cleveland heads trap enough oil in the valve covers to create a pool of oil that partially submerges the exhaust springs? The location and size of that drain hole was just as intentional as the rest of the design.

-G
____________________________________________________________

Pantera Photos | 351C Historic Information | 351C Technical Information

If you use a 351C 4V powered vehicle for a grocery getter ... the eggs aren't going to make it home!
George, just re read your thoughts. Do you think 0.040" is the go?
Cheers.
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Joined: October 1st, 2004, 8:05 pm

May 24th, 2011, 12:46 am #10

I think the 0.040" orifice supplies enough oil. But that's a very small orifice that can be easily plugged by debris. Some folks believe that's why the Ford orifices were 0.060". Not because the additional lubricant was needed, but because the larger hole is less likely to become plugged.

FYI the holes in the Moroso cam bearing restrictors are also 0.060".

I'm good with anything between 0.040" and 0.060". I'm not adamant about one particular size. Nobody has ever complained about their bushing orifices clogging up ... yet From a lubrication and cooling stand point I don't think there's any need to go bigger than 0.040" with a solid lifter, not for street, drag racing, road racing, endurance racing. The question is, do you feel comfortable the 0.040" orifice won't clog up? If you don't, then go bigger, but don't exceed 0.060".

Bushings installed in hydraulic lifter motors should have orifices in them the same size as the orifice in the hydraulic lifter ... to ensure the lifter is not starved for oil. Oil flow should be limited "downstream" by using push rods with restrictions in the tips.

-G
____________________________________________________________

Pantera Photos | 351C Historic Information | 351C Technical Information

If you use a 351C 4V powered vehicle for a grocery getter ... the eggs aren't going to make it home!
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