busted pilot bearing

busted pilot bearing

Joined: February 11th, 2002, 3:43 am

June 17th, 2012, 1:05 am #1

... pulled the TKO 500 today to install a QuickTime bellhousing, got a little surprise:



Any recommendations for a replacement? Stock 71 USA crank. TKO 500 with 23 spline input.

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Doug
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Joined: November 25th, 2006, 4:54 am

June 18th, 2012, 1:51 pm #2

I guess it's not really relevant now that you are fitting a brand new bellhousing, but have you, or are you going to dial the new one in?

Would have been interesting to check the old alignment.....which would cause unnecessary side loads on the pilot bearing.

checking both the concentricity to the crank and how parallel the BH is to the block?
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Joined: February 11th, 2002, 3:43 am

June 20th, 2012, 8:34 pm #3

We won't be doing anything if we can't get the old pilot remnants out of the crank. I'll be hitting Autozone tomorrow to rent a blind hole puller.

But to answer the question re: bell alignment... yes, it will be dialed in. Might as well try to do it right, hopefully I'll only have to do it once that way (had a shop do the original install).

I actually double-checked the concentricity earlier today before I came to work (bought an alignment tool from Browell as mentioned in the other thread):http://www.network54.com/Forum/119419/m ... +alignment

Under .003" runout.

For the parallelism I'll have to get on google & see how to do it, but if that's as good as the concentricity, I should be set.

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Doug
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Joined: February 17th, 2004, 11:02 pm

June 21st, 2012, 3:42 pm #4

> I'll be hitting Autozone tomorrow to rent a blind hole puller.

I have one of those (slide hammer style with internal jaws) and it has work
great on most everything I tried it on until I went to replace the roller
pilot bearing in my 1987 Mustang GT. That sucker would not budge. I tried
the slide hammer until my hands literally bled. Finally in frustration, I
tried the grease trick. I filled the hole with a heavy grease and found
a wooden dowel (or was it a brass drift?) of the right diameter and tapped
it in with a light hammer. It walked out so easily it was like magic.
If the puller doesn't work, have some grease handy. I've heard guys will
also use wet toilet paper to fill gaps if the grease leaks out but I didn't
need to do that.

Dan Jones
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Joined: February 11th, 2002, 3:43 am

June 21st, 2012, 4:07 pm #5

We tried the grease method first with no luck.

Rented the BHP (blind hole puller) this morning. It took a minute to get it fixed in the bearing, then 3-4 taps with the slide and it was out.

Then we threw it on the ground, stomped on it, and laid a wicked gypsy curse on it for good measure :o

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Doug
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Joined: March 12th, 2002, 2:39 pm

June 21st, 2012, 5:09 pm #6

I always use the bushings instead of bearings.
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Joined: May 20th, 2005, 4:48 pm

June 21st, 2012, 5:42 pm #7

On a higher friction disc material like sintered iron, the dust can cause quicker wear of a bronze bushing.

For most organic clutches, I will use the bronze bushings....for hipo stuff, I like bearings.

Brent Lykins
B2 Motorsports, LLC






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Joined: February 11th, 2002, 3:43 am

June 21st, 2012, 8:08 pm #8

This is the style I went with:



Quick question - is that whole inner ring on the face of the bearing assembly supposed to rotate, or just the innards?

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Doug
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Joined: April 30th, 2005, 7:32 am

June 21st, 2012, 10:01 pm #9

just the innards
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Joined: February 11th, 2002, 3:43 am

June 21st, 2012, 11:09 pm #10

>> just the innards

Thank you sir, good to know I didn't botch the install. I should have checked it when I picked it up but I was in a hurry.

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Doug
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