Trying to find my clan

Trying to find my clan

Michael McAtee
Michael McAtee

September 18th, 2015, 3:42 pm #1

Hello! I've traced my lineage (McAtee) to William M'Ghie, Burgess of Kirkcudbright born around (1515). I'm trying to find out what (if any) the M'Ghie / MacGhie / McGhie's would belong to. Clan Mackay seems most reasonable from my research. Any thoughts?
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Michael McAtee
Michael McAtee

September 18th, 2015, 8:04 pm #2

I've been able to trace my lineage (McAtee) to Gilber M'Gy, 2nd Lord of Balmage. Below is all the information I have on him.

Note that he was the "head of the powerful McGhie branch of the Clan Mackay". I guess I've figured out my own question...

Gilbert M'Gy (Scottish Gaelic: Gillebhride MagAoidh) of that Ilk, 2nd Lord of Balmage, 3rd Chief of the Name and Arms of McGhie (1370–1426) was a Scottish landowner and head of the powerful McGhie branch of the Clan Mackay, which, effectively operated independently, using its own coat of arms and seals and owning swathes of land in Kirkcudbrightshire for over a thousand years, from the 9th to the 19th centuries, at which point the estates were sold and the chiefly family slid, of its own accord, into relative obscurity.

M'Gy (whose name is variously recorded as Macge, M'Ke, M'Gy and McGhie) had a charter from the King for the lands of Balmaghie in Galloway, and was the direct descendant of Prince Aodh Ethelred, Earl of Moray and son of King Malcolm III.

He married Mariota de Keth and had a son, William, 2nd Lord. He was the ancestor of Sir John M'Ghie.
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Earl McGee
Earl McGee

September 19th, 2015, 9:05 pm #3

http://www.mymcgee.com/mcghiesofbalmaghie2.pdf

This old journal notes the direct line of descent for the M'Ghies you're apparently referencing. I'd be interested in hearing how the McAtees and the McGhies intersect. As for myself, cannot trace my family back further than about 1734 in Northern Ireland, though we're purportedly of Scottish extraction. Have certainly seen some MacKay societies indicate that a branch of the Northern MacKays had immigrated to that region and were referred to as "McGees," but would not know if they had any relation to that McGhie family. Earl
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Michael McAtee
Michael McAtee

September 20th, 2015, 1:18 am #4

I appreciate the information. As near as I can tell my McAtee descendents had several spellings to their surname throughout history (Mackatee, MacAtee, etc.) as they passed from Scotland to Ireland then to America. Following what I can from my grandparents records and oral tradition it would seem that the original pronunciation of our surname was MacGhie. This follows what records I have found on Ancestry.com.

As with most things of this nature, I'm not 100% certain of the validity, but it all seems to point to the same direction.
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Earl McGee
Earl McGee

September 20th, 2015, 2:13 am #5

So, you're Ulster-Scott, too, Michael. I really got into the whole roots thing when I stumbled on a family genealogy online a few years ago that provided a wealth of information no one in my immediate family knew anything about before then and I took it from there with my own research but it petered out in the early 1700's. From what I can tell checking online McAtee is a sept of clan MacIntyre. Took in my first Scottish festival last year and loved it. Going back next week. Earl
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Michael McAtee
Michael McAtee

September 20th, 2015, 3:16 am #6

I looked into the McIntyre association, but apparently Mac An TSaoi (McAtee) and Mac An tSaoir (McAteer or McIntyre) are different families, though some thing they may be related in the very distant past.

Your story is not unlike my own. I found some genealogy work that deceased family members have done in years past, and coupled it with what I could find online and through ancestry.com, thus beginning my own roots study. I am reasonably certain of my liniage to Scotland in the early 1700's to a Mackatee, then found some blurb that his father spelled his last name M'Ghie, which led me down a path to MacGhie and the Mackay clan.
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Michael McAtee
Michael McAtee

September 20th, 2015, 4:13 am #7

I was looking through my records and the Mackatee in Scotland was in the early 1600's, not 1700's.
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Earl McGee
Earl McGee

September 20th, 2015, 4:02 pm #8

While it does appear that MacTeer was directly associated with MacInyre, as this noteshttp://web.ncf.ca/cd200/mac31.html
spelling was fluid and McAtee apparently was a spelling variation of it. There are so many things besides whether records exist which get in the way of tracing family history very far into the past. Scottish surnames did not tend to settle into set patterns consistently until the 1600's. Then there is the whole thing about census records. I'd learned that census takers of the 1700's tended to record names they heard spoken phonetically, thus the variation. So, our name was recorded as Magee in 1 early census though in others it was McGee. 1 MacKay society noted that Mackay as pronounced way back when sounded like Magee. So, who knows if you're a McAtee, Michael, or a McGhie. Earl
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Michael McAtee
Michael McAtee

September 20th, 2015, 5:16 pm #9

That is what I'm finding as well. I have been communicating with a McAtee (apparent distant cousin of mine) who has done extensive genealogy work. She is going to Scotland to dig through some archives. Hopefully that will firm things up a bit, but I'm sure that we'll never know with 100% certainty due to phonetic spelling of names. There has always been uncertainty of where the McAtee name originated and what (if any) clan we belong to. My research suggested that a tie to the MacGhie name is most probable.

What I do know is that I have signed up to become a member of the Clan Mackay USA, so whether it's as an adopted member, or by blood, my family are now members of Clan Mackay, to which I am very proud.

Thank you again for the information. I look forward to learning more.
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Michael McAtee
Michael McAtee

September 21st, 2015, 3:22 pm #10

While it does appear that MacTeer was directly associated with MacInyre, as this noteshttp://web.ncf.ca/cd200/mac31.html
spelling was fluid and McAtee apparently was a spelling variation of it. There are so many things besides whether records exist which get in the way of tracing family history very far into the past. Scottish surnames did not tend to settle into set patterns consistently until the 1600's. Then there is the whole thing about census records. I'd learned that census takers of the 1700's tended to record names they heard spoken phonetically, thus the variation. So, our name was recorded as Magee in 1 early census though in others it was McGee. 1 MacKay society noted that Mackay as pronounced way back when sounded like Magee. So, who knows if you're a McAtee, Michael, or a McGhie. Earl
I've been looking through my relatives genealogy work (there's a lot) and have come across some interesting facts.

PATRICK McAtee my decedent that came to America, and his brothers (Patrick, Edmond & Henry) immigrated to America together From Ireland they went to the port in Bristol, England where they left on the ship "Batchelor" and arrived in St. Mary's County, Maryland in 1674 with ninety men planning to become indentured servants (Patent MM: 152). Upon landing in St. Mary's City, Maryland, Patrick and Henry were indentured to His Excellency Charles Calvert. Brother Edmond was indentured to Robert Ridgely. All 3 brothers used the surname "Magee" on the ship's manifest on the trip to America.

Patrick married a young lady with the first name of Rosamond. There is controversy over her maiden name. Some say it was Green (Greene, some say it was Browne. Regardless they had 7 children. James the last was the only one born in America. Notes from his son James say he emigrated from Ireland in 1684. Patrick was in Charles County, Maryland before 1695 when his son James was born. He lived at the head of the Wicomico River. He and Rosamond may have come from County Claire or County Cork in Ireland. In 1686 Patrick was 34 years old. James Browne was in Maryland in the 1630's and was considered well-to-do. James was married to a Ann Smithson. She was from England. Court documents show that there was no children from this marriage. James Browne and Patrick became close friends. There was an epidemic in Maryland in 1698 and James Browne died w/o a will. He left everything to his wife and she died shortly thereafter and on her death bed left everything to Patrick.
On the patent the clerk wrote their names as Patrick Magee and Edmund Magee.

So you are correct that names were apparently spelled phonetically. This does tend to firm up (in my mind at least) my family's connection to the Magee (Macghie) name.
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