Memorial Day 2011

Memorial Day 2011

Dr. Donald H. McGee
Dr. Donald H. McGee

May 28th, 2011, 9:40 pm #1

Truly the observant and thankful thing to remember this Memorial Day weekend is LEST WE FORGET! God bless those of our Clan and others who have served all of us in our Armed Forces including those of our number w ho gave their lives. Even those Mackay who live across the pond will remember fallen soldiers patriotically. God bless. Don McGee.
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Major (Retd) James McKay
Major (Retd) James McKay

May 29th, 2011, 10:48 pm #2

Greetings from Auld Scotia,
Thank you to Dr Don for his fine words on this Memorial Day, but there are no words that can express the thanks we owe to ALL our troops - on both sides of this Ocean that divides us, those who have given their lives, their broken bodies, and those who continue to Serve and protect us.

Throughout the many conflicts, throughout the many years, America and the UK have stood fast. Long may it last and may the BOND never be broken.

Tonight at 2300hrs (local time), myself and many of my former comrades let fly 3 Lanterns into the sky as a symbol of commemoration to Three young comrades brutally murdered by terrorists in another conflict. But more importantly to commemorate ALL our fallen comrades, from Campaigns gone by, to the present day. I raised a solitary glass, 'Deoch slainte nam ban righ, deoch slainte na Gael'

Lest We Forget!

Yours Aye, Jim McKay, Stirling, Scotland.
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David B. McKay
David B. McKay

June 1st, 2011, 7:09 pm #3

Major (retd) McKay,

Alas, I don't know the language. Can you provide a translation for: "Deoch slainte nam ban righ, deoch slainte na Gael?"

Lt Col (retd) McKay
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Michael McKay
Michael McKay

June 2nd, 2011, 4:14 pm #4

Something along the lines of drink to the health of the queen and drink to the health of the highlander.
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Jim McKay
Jim McKay

June 2nd, 2011, 10:09 pm #5

Hi David and Michael,
Firstly thank you for YOUR response to my 'Post' and Michael you're 'there or thereaboots' with YOUR translation. Let me now put it in context. The 'Toast' that I made to my Fallen (Murdered) comrades is used after the second 'set' of 'Pipes' and is made by the Senior Piper when presented with his 'dram' by whomsoever is 'Chairing' the Dinner, be it the Company Commander (of which I was one) or perhaps the Commanding Officer.

In the Warrant Officers and Sergeant's Mess, the 'presentation', would be made by the Regimental Sergeant Major - I 'graced' both of those fine Establishments!
My use of my FORMER Rank was merely to show or at least allude to the fact that I had, indeed, a Military background and this particular time, not only for the good folk of America on Memorial weekend, but also for a Commemoration weekend that many of my former comrades had journeyed over to Belfast for.

Now the 'nippy sweetie' bit. I don't know David, if YOUR use of Lt Col. was a bit of 'tit for tat', but I can assure you that MY use of my Former rank was NOT for self aggrandizement, but merely to put my somewhat 'emotive' Post in context. After 31 years in uniform I'm sure you'll allow me that privilege? FAUGH A BALLAGH!
Regards, just plain Jim McKay
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Michelle Sandelier
Michelle Sandelier

June 2nd, 2011, 11:07 pm #6

On a day that is emblazoned on our hearts, I found it both comforting and strengthening to read notes from men who served, survived and remembered those who died. Thank you all for your service and dedication to freedom.

Perhaps the notation of rank comes from a feeling of camaraderie at a time when we remember our association with the military most, and not from "self aggrandizement", Jim.

Having been associated all my life, 60 years an USAF Dependant with the military (Grandparents, Aunts and Uncles, cousins, Father , sister, brother's in law, Husband and Son all having served, My father (ret. CMSgt USAF) and husband (ret. SMSgt USAF)served 26 years and 22 years respectively),I am amazed and grateful for the strength of the respect that military people have for one another. They can meet for the very first time and have and instant feeling of friendship and sharing because of that shared experience of service to our nation and nations who share our values. This has never, in my experience, hinged on ranks being comparable. Once retired, no one outranks another unless you are recalled.

Best Regards, Michelle Sandelier

PS When using Gaelic, for those of us who are not blessed with the gift of tongues, please include a translation. What does FAUGH A BALLAGH! mean? I couldn't find any thing in the translation dictionary that made sense, separately the words meant "fattened" and "pig"...I'm sure that must not be correct ...
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Michael McKay
Michael McKay

June 2nd, 2011, 11:44 pm #7

'FAUGH A BALLAGH' means get out of the way but the spelling is Anglicised and not the way it's spelled in Gaelic.
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Michael McKay
Michael McKay

June 2nd, 2011, 11:52 pm #8

Hi David and Michael,
Firstly thank you for YOUR response to my 'Post' and Michael you're 'there or thereaboots' with YOUR translation. Let me now put it in context. The 'Toast' that I made to my Fallen (Murdered) comrades is used after the second 'set' of 'Pipes' and is made by the Senior Piper when presented with his 'dram' by whomsoever is 'Chairing' the Dinner, be it the Company Commander (of which I was one) or perhaps the Commanding Officer.

In the Warrant Officers and Sergeant's Mess, the 'presentation', would be made by the Regimental Sergeant Major - I 'graced' both of those fine Establishments!
My use of my FORMER Rank was merely to show or at least allude to the fact that I had, indeed, a Military background and this particular time, not only for the good folk of America on Memorial weekend, but also for a Commemoration weekend that many of my former comrades had journeyed over to Belfast for.

Now the 'nippy sweetie' bit. I don't know David, if YOUR use of Lt Col. was a bit of 'tit for tat', but I can assure you that MY use of my Former rank was NOT for self aggrandizement, but merely to put my somewhat 'emotive' Post in context. After 31 years in uniform I'm sure you'll allow me that privilege? FAUGH A BALLAGH!
Regards, just plain Jim McKay
Basically I just saw where he asked for a translation and I just gave him a literal one based on what I thought the words meant.

'Deoch (drink) slainte (health) nam (of the) ban righ (queen), deoch (drink) slainte (health) na Gael (Highlander)'

Gael is the term Highlanders referred to themselves in the native tongue like 'Deutsch' means German people.

Not sure where all the drama is coming from.
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Jim Mckay
Jim Mckay

June 3rd, 2011, 6:58 am #9

Good Morning Michael, MS and Fellow Clansfolk,
If the 'Post' inspired you to dig around for a translation, or even to find out where all this stuff comes from - then GREAT! So much better than being apathetic about it, shrugging your shoulders and saying you don't care ANYWAY!

Likewise 'Faugh a Ballagh', although it's used as a 'riposte' by another of my (Irish) Military friends, instead of just literally translating it, would it not be more interesting - and even FUN - finding out the ORIGIN of where and when it was used?

It's all good stuff! Hopefully David will come back on here and maybe contribute some more of HIS thoughts. Incidentally, I'm a Moderator on the Royal Highland Fusiliers Veterans' Forum, where I can assure you there are some 'Debates' that would make the air turn BLUE/BLACK/GREEN/PURPLE - or any other colour you LIKE!! 'Nippy sweetie's'(see? - another wee 'snippet' for you to try and find the origin of!) there are MANY, believe me! LOL!

Regards to you ALL, the sun is shining here (for a change) I'll visit that fine, sagacious and eloquent Member of this august organ in Naples in some four short weeks' time, Dr Don McGee of that Parish, and I'm sure we'll discuss the finer points of these and many other issues on this Forum!

Jim McKay
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John Grogan
John Grogan

June 6th, 2011, 12:13 am #10

'FAUGH A BALLAGH' means get out of the way but the spelling is Anglicised and not the way it's spelled in Gaelic.
FAUGH A BALLAGH is a battle cry of Irish origin, meaning "clear the way". The spelling is an 18th-century anglicization of the Irish language phrase Fág an Bealach. Its first recorded use as a regimental motto was by the Royal Irish Fusiliers in 1798. It remains the motto of the Royal Irish Regiment today.
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