Moderator: oldtime

Different types of fans and horsepower loss

Jesse from MN
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Joined: 1:23 AM - Nov 19, 2014

10:47 PM - May 01, 2017 #1

Hey guys, just watched it today and found it pretty interesting. They were using an rpm range about double of what a stock Willys would run, but this could apply to folks that have done engine swaps.

I was thinking about trying a plastic flexible fan myself on a stock engine to eek out a little more efficiency, but it looks to be pretty much moot. Maybe a clutch fan would help slightly if at all. Interesting watch all the same.
https://youtu.be/ZXdLgaFXZzs

-Jesse
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Duffer
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Duffer
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Joined: 2:25 PM - Feb 23, 2009

10:57 PM - May 03, 2017 #2

I think most of us are cognizant of the relative consumption of HP by various fan designs. But what was entirely missing in the evaluation was an equally important property of the fans-not to mention the only reason for their existence: how much air do they move through the rpm band? That is the single most important attribute for myself and I still believe that a fixed blade OEM style fan can move more air than anything else if using the optimum set up. Personally, I'll take the hit on the economy in exchange for a rock solid cooling system.
John, SW Montana

55 CJ 3B, transmake, fiberglass/aluminum tub/hood/fenders, 381 sbc, AGE M22W trans, "super" D18/Teralows & Warn OD, D44/ARB/Dutchman front & full float D44/Powrloc rear axles-4.10's, Holbrook springs, 4 wheel power discs, Saginaw PS, Warn 8274

68 CJ5, stock 225, T86AA, D18w/ Warn OD, D27A & stock D44 (heavy duty housing)-4.88's, 11" brakes, stock Ross box, Belleview 6000 (a close to stock vehicle, including the Whitco top)
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johnhombre
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Joined: 9:21 PM - May 08, 2017

9:01 PM - Oct 05, 2018 #3

This is an interesting issue, which has been talked about for a long time in different boards, since it is probably the biggest power savings possible.  Here are some excepted facts; The Go Devil engine was rated at 60 Hp @ 4000 RPM.  It is believed that the stock fan can draw up to 20Hp from the engine. The flex fan can save about  30 %, and the clutch fan 70 %, but both never fully disengage. The electric fan does turn off when not  in use, giving the biggest energy saving of the three.  When the electric fans runs, it draw about 15 amps to operate.  If you do the math, that equals to abut 1/4 Hp motor. Not much drag on the engine there.  Most all high performance cars use electric fan due to this power advantage.

Every thing has a down side.  In this case, the electric fan draws 15 amp off the electrical system.  So, your  power source may need to be up graded.  It is not as "rock  solid" as the simple belt driven fan. A wire, or electrical connections can short out, but that would be rare. For most jeep enthusiasts, the electric fans are not traditional, and don't have that Willy's roar when accelerating. In face, they only run when needed like your normal car. I have not seen any 6 volt  fans on the market, again an upgrade may be necessary.

I  think it all depends on how you use your  vehicle, If you need more power to keep up with traffic, or scramble up a hill, electric fans may be your answer. Today, kits can be very sophisticated, and pricey, depending on your needs.  I am still deciding for my latest rebuild. I do love that roar.
CJ - 3B, 12 volt, 134F, 11 inch drums, dual master cylinder, Overdrive, (in progress)
CJ - 3A, 1953, 134L, 6 volt, original
CJ - Wagon, 1956, Super Hurricane, 12 volt, Ramsey PTO,
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SteveK
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SteveK
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Joined: 3:34 PM - Jan 03, 2012

12:20 AM - Oct 06, 2018 #4

FYI, here's one 6V fan and others are out there...  https://www.ebay.com/itm/6-Volt-6v-Elec ... tc&vxp=mtr
SteveK
62 Dispatcher
South Florida
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