What is the issue converting gasoline tanks to diesel ?

Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

September 29th, 2017, 2:08 pm #1

I've heard this cant (or shouldn't) be done.

Paul
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Joined: December 1st, 2014, 8:51 pm

September 30th, 2017, 2:53 am #2

Paul,

The problem has to do with the gasoline powered boats had galvanized tanks. The diesel fuel will chemically react with the galvanizing and dissolve it, depositing a zinc compound in the bottom of the tank.

This in effect, removes the corrosion protection that the galvanizing supplied plus contaminates the tank with an ongoing supply of crap that will plug the fuel filters in addition to having a chemically altered diesel fuel.

The original diesel tanks supplied by Chris-Craft were made of monel.
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Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

October 1st, 2017, 5:28 pm #3

I'll bet there are a few people out there who learned this the hard way !

Regards
Paul
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Thomas
Thomas

October 2nd, 2017, 7:32 am #4

I've heard this cant (or shouldn't) be done.

Paul
You need to add a fuel return line as well! Would not like to add that on any tank that has had gasoline in it....
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Joined: December 1st, 2014, 8:51 pm

October 4th, 2017, 3:36 am #5

You can make an empty gas tank safe if you fill the tank with argon or nitrogen and keep the inert gas flowing at a low rate while doing the work. This includes welding and or drilling-cutting.

Personally, I prefer the argon. It is quite heavy and tends to stay pooled in the tank as long as you keep the openings on top, just like if it is filled with water. The nitrogen has a tendency to mix with the atmosphere so requires a higher flow rate.

This method is also much safer than just filling a tank with water as filling with water can leave air pockets with gas fumes. The inert gas method prevents the accumulation of air pockets containing gas fumes.

A couple of per-cautions, you need to have a way to verify that atmosphere inside the tank will not support combustion and that there is sufficient ventilation to prevent the inert gas from flooding the compartment that you are working in.
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Eric Jensen
Eric Jensen

October 4th, 2017, 11:27 am #6

Paul,

The problem has to do with the gasoline powered boats had galvanized tanks. The diesel fuel will chemically react with the galvanizing and dissolve it, depositing a zinc compound in the bottom of the tank.

This in effect, removes the corrosion protection that the galvanizing supplied plus contaminates the tank with an ongoing supply of crap that will plug the fuel filters in addition to having a chemically altered diesel fuel.

The original diesel tanks supplied by Chris-Craft were made of monel.
Somewhat skeptical at first. After all, you see plenty of galvanized jerry cans with diesel fuel in them. Turns out though there's something to it. Apparently, the effect is immediately worse on the injectors rather than the integrity of the can, but..... https://www.galvanizeit.org/education-a ... rage-tanks


It never ceases to amaze me what you can bring up on a screen with a few minutes research.

ej
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Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

October 4th, 2017, 6:21 pm #7

You can make an empty gas tank safe if you fill the tank with argon or nitrogen and keep the inert gas flowing at a low rate while doing the work. This includes welding and or drilling-cutting.

Personally, I prefer the argon. It is quite heavy and tends to stay pooled in the tank as long as you keep the openings on top, just like if it is filled with water. The nitrogen has a tendency to mix with the atmosphere so requires a higher flow rate.

This method is also much safer than just filling a tank with water as filling with water can leave air pockets with gas fumes. The inert gas method prevents the accumulation of air pockets containing gas fumes.

A couple of per-cautions, you need to have a way to verify that atmosphere inside the tank will not support combustion and that there is sufficient ventilation to prevent the inert gas from flooding the compartment that you are working in.
....don't try this at home (or on the boat) !



Paul
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