* Update on the 20' fiberglass Sea Skiff project (an "almost Commander")

* Update on the 20' fiberglass Sea Skiff project (an "almost Commander")

Paul
Paul

December 16th, 2006, 10:23 pm #1

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.







Last edited by FEfinaticP on May 16th, 2012, 10:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

December 16th, 2006, 11:06 pm #2


Here is a marine plywood piece that has been "encapsulated" and bonded to the side of the hull with polyester, and a polyester soaked fiberglass strap. The purpose of this wood piece is to receive screws that hold vinyl side pieces.



This shows the inside of the starboard hull and if you look closely, you can see a horizontal box beam run along the side, for purposes of general strength and also to hang supports to hold the flooring. You can also see the imbedded plywood.


That vertical piece on the left is part of a fiberglass and wood "air duct" that runs from the cast in scoop on the side of the boat and down into the bilge.

I suspect much of this construction technique was "learned" by acquiring Thompson in 1962 and refined for use in all of the Lancers, Corsairs, and the entire Commander line. Naturally the big Commanders use heavier roving, but the techniques appear to be the same. No three piece hull on this one though!

Regards, Paul
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Paul
Paul

December 16th, 2006, 11:19 pm #3

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






I am not a big fan of a single lever to control a boat, but hey, this is original equipment and I plan to restore it accordingly. I am comforted that the torque of an idling 327 will easily manuver this boat to the dock. Looking at everything about this hardware, it looks solid as a rock and therefore it's worth the expense of replating.

Here is a photo of the selector in place, taken under the blue shrink wrapping


Here you can see the pitting on the casting. 40 years of humidity have taken their toll.


Here's what the inside of this puppy looks like, still as good as the day it came off the assembly line.






I don't know about the Commanders that were built in the Cortland, New York plant (two years after this boat was built) but I suspect there are a lot of Lancers and Corsairs out there using this same MORSE hardware. It's a pretty nifty assembly, and it should clean up quite nicely. I think having period hardware like this will add to the allure of the boat, especially if someone who knows the vintage well sees it. Hmmmm, I'll bet the boat show judges have never seen one of these boats???

I took a series of documentary photos to assure I can get all of this back in place properly. Lots of "under the dash" photos, and lots of the windshield and steering gear too.

Regards, Paul









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Tom Slayton
Tom Slayton

December 17th, 2006, 12:03 am #4

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






Congratulations on the progress, Paul, I'm impressed with the drive you apparently have, because I've seen a lot of work being done on that project of yours in a fairly short time frame. I guess you're serious about having a runabout to drive in the springtime. I am also impressed at your measures to keep things original, because I can't tell you how many boats I have seen over the years that have "the mark" of a previous owner left on them. Few people have the restraint to "leave well enough alone" and it seems everyone wants to personalize or customize things. Thats not all bad, but more often than not, the customization from the general public is not a pretty sight.

I have been looking over the files you posted about Warren Pateman's restoration of his 38' Commander. That whole project of his is inspirational. His work is all custom. He did it to such a high standard I think he missed his calling in life and should have been in the boat design or manufacturing business. The decision has to be made on each project, and on yours I think it's great to keep the boat as original as possible.

Cheers, Tom



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Roy
Roy

December 17th, 2006, 5:58 pm #5

I am not a big fan of a single lever to control a boat, but hey, this is original equipment and I plan to restore it accordingly. I am comforted that the torque of an idling 327 will easily manuver this boat to the dock. Looking at everything about this hardware, it looks solid as a rock and therefore it's worth the expense of replating.

Here is a photo of the selector in place, taken under the blue shrink wrapping


Here you can see the pitting on the casting. 40 years of humidity have taken their toll.


Here's what the inside of this puppy looks like, still as good as the day it came off the assembly line.






I don't know about the Commanders that were built in the Cortland, New York plant (two years after this boat was built) but I suspect there are a lot of Lancers and Corsairs out there using this same MORSE hardware. It's a pretty nifty assembly, and it should clean up quite nicely. I think having period hardware like this will add to the allure of the boat, especially if someone who knows the vintage well sees it. Hmmmm, I'll bet the boat show judges have never seen one of these boats???

I took a series of documentary photos to assure I can get all of this back in place properly. Lots of "under the dash" photos, and lots of the windshield and steering gear too.

Regards, Paul








Do yourself a favor though, and do all the sanding yourself. Get it generally cleaned up so they won't be tempted to put it on a fast production device and screw it up. Most of the damage at rechroming shops comes from their haste to get things prepped. You can take a wet sandpaper and spend an evening on that, and you'll be surprised how clean it will look. Be prepared to sand long enough to get down to the bottom of all the pitting. It would have been better if that piece was brass, but it's still going to look like new with a good prep and plating.

Roy
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Paul
Paul

December 17th, 2006, 8:03 pm #6

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






Wow, I've discovered some interesting stuff during the disassembly of everything. I found a first aid kit tucked waaaay back in one of those side pockets where you wouldn't normally look. It contains a mirror, a very cool old hand compass, a nice case pocket knife, assorted first aid provisions, and a note outlining every single item in the box, including the dime (dated 1966).

I found a cool multipurpose tool, which is a plier with an adjustable wrench on the handle. It's old style, well built, and I soaked it down with penetrating oil. It can be re-used and I guess I'll keep it aboard as a memento.

Now for the GOOD STUFF !

(drumroll please)

Upon lifting out some of those side trim pieces, I see something that looks like a credit card. It's wedged in the upturned vinyl lip on the backside of the bottom edge of one of those panels. It is located inside one of those side pockets. Guess what it is?

(drumroll please)

It is a NY State Conservation Dept., Division of Motor Boats-Albany, NY 12201 certificate of boat registration. The name is Alfred L. Goodman, of 2077 Lexington PKY, Schenectady, NY 12309. The expiration date is 10-31-73 which would have made the boat 8-years old at the time of expiration. Mr. goodman's birthday is listed as 3-22-22, which would make him 85 years old today.

You know how much I would love to contact this gentleman and discuss his boat! Anyone out there with connections in NY, it sure would be good to find Alfred! How cool! Perhaps he's the one who itemized all of the notes in the first aid kit.

Almost forgot, there is another pouch discovered in the boat, sealed in a ziplock type of pouch of sorts. It looks like a list from an outing. I'll post later when I can uplink the images.

Paul
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Paul
Paul

December 18th, 2006, 12:03 am #7

This is the "Rosetta Stone" of the boat history, as I believe this was the original owner. I believe Mr. Goodman is deceased, from information obtained from another "Goodman" I found on the internet and called by phone this eve. He was very considerate and cordial, and said he knew of Alfred L. Goodman, but he was deceased. He did name his son, however, who I am trying to get in contact with now, hopefully tomorrow as his tele is unlisted.


The son would be roughly my age, and I suspect he would have been water skiing behind "that green boat". So I am wondering how to open the subject. Perhaps I'll say, "did you ever water ski behind a green boat?"

In honor of Mr. Alfred L Goodman, I went out to the boat, put my hand on it, and proposed a toast to him today. May he rest in peace. What this does, is it reinforces my notion that we are all custodians of the boats (cars, houses, land, etc.) that we own at the moment, and someday there will be another owner. Mr. Goodman may be gone, but in 1966 when the boat was new, he was 44 years old, and I suspect he had a young boy who spent a lot of time aboard the boat.


Here are some of the other things found aboard. This is a first aid kit, which I found wedged waaay forward of a side pocket. It may have been there through several owners, and the only way they would have found it would be to disassemble the boat like I did.


Whomever assembled this kit, was VERY methodical about it. Everything is in it's place. Everything is itemized, and ready if needed.









Interesting how you can learn more about a boat during a restoration process ! Part of the fun and appreciation factor.

Regards, Paul











July 2012 Edit Comment: I don't know if it is apparent from subsequent postings or not, but I did reach Mr. Goodmans's son, who is a retired surgeon, who remembers the boat, water skiing, etc., and who said he would talk with his mother who is still alive about the boat. I asked him if he had any photos, which I would love to get, but he did not seem interested in searching his family photos for some guy who was goober about the old family boat. He said it was used on Lake George for 25 years, bung in a boat house each winter, and that explains the stress deformation I found on the rear boat lift hooks, which I had to replace, due to perhaps hanging the boat with a full fuel tank. I asked the son if he would want the contents I found but he was not interested in having that stuff around the house either. Oh well, it was an interesting find, and it sure rings home the notion that these boats have seen a lot of history during their life so far. In that sense they do have soul !

Regards,

Paul

Last edited by FEfinaticP on July 12th, 2012, 4:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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James Brunette
James Brunette

December 18th, 2006, 1:04 am #8

I like your take on the "custodian of care" philosophy. I also am fascinated by some of these old boats, and wonder what kind of tales they would tell if they could talk.

Interesting read, thanks for posting the story.

JB
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Paul
Paul

December 18th, 2006, 3:30 pm #9

I am not a big fan of a single lever to control a boat, but hey, this is original equipment and I plan to restore it accordingly. I am comforted that the torque of an idling 327 will easily manuver this boat to the dock. Looking at everything about this hardware, it looks solid as a rock and therefore it's worth the expense of replating.

Here is a photo of the selector in place, taken under the blue shrink wrapping


Here you can see the pitting on the casting. 40 years of humidity have taken their toll.


Here's what the inside of this puppy looks like, still as good as the day it came off the assembly line.






I don't know about the Commanders that were built in the Cortland, New York plant (two years after this boat was built) but I suspect there are a lot of Lancers and Corsairs out there using this same MORSE hardware. It's a pretty nifty assembly, and it should clean up quite nicely. I think having period hardware like this will add to the allure of the boat, especially if someone who knows the vintage well sees it. Hmmmm, I'll bet the boat show judges have never seen one of these boats???

I took a series of documentary photos to assure I can get all of this back in place properly. Lots of "under the dash" photos, and lots of the windshield and steering gear too.

Regards, Paul








here's the proof, it's the exact same MORSE twin cable selector, one to the gearbox, the other to the throttle.

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I suspect the rack and pinion steering gear is identical as well, but the instruments are different.

Another one of those obscure trivia points you can dig out some day when you're at a boat show

regards, Paul
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Paul
Paul

December 18th, 2006, 3:38 pm #10

Ooops, I failed to see that traditional steering gear in the previous photo. Here's a closeup.



Odd that the high powered SS would go back to the rod driven steering system, but as you can see from the photo below (my 1956 300-hp Sportsman) the ole rod driven steering is reliable and it works without feedback or strain. Perhaps that's the reason they chose thos "old style" steering for the Commander Super Sport too?



From what I've heard, not all of the SS Commanders got this type of steering. Maybe there was a transition when the model evolved into the XK-19

Looking at Alan Jackson's SS, (below) no change here, but that hardware is identical to what I'm presently restoring.


Regards, Paul

Last edited by FEfinaticP on December 18th, 2006, 3:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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