Bill Basler
Bill Basler

June 19th, 2007, 11:47 am #91

This is the front air scoop on the 1966 20' fiberglass Sea Skiff. As you can see, it's cast into the boat and it's not the traditional clamshell air scoop. Clamshells are on the back of the boat in a traditional manner, but these things are just a bit strange. I think this design was changed later on when the same basic hull was sold as the Corsair Sea-V, as I've seen photos that show a front clamshell in this location, with a slightly modified top deck.







In any case, they're off to the rechroming shop.






Looking at the image received from the Mariners Museum, shows the clamshells instead of this cast in vent. I like the clamshells, myself, but since the boat has the cast in fiberglass vent device, naturally thats the way it will be.







Regards,
Paul
Paul, on the "other" forum, you may have noted my new acquisition, a 1964 Chris-Craft XL175 Corsair. This boat is right in the same vintage as you Skiffish boat. The XL175 has a fairly ridiculous...but cool...scoop on the engine compartment hatch. It reminds me of a pro-street hood a high-school gearhead would have added to a 71 Camaro, as it stands about 6 inches tall. The scoop opening is rear facing, and it has the exact same kind of bezel and screening material as you scoops.

Bill
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Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

June 19th, 2007, 2:57 pm #92

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






I had no choice on this matter, the old steering rack and cable was frozen up solid. I got with Teleflex and they referenced me to their rack and pinion system. During my research I saw a more expensive version of this called the "no feedback system", and I thought it might be a better unit. It wasn't. It has an internal clutch so it's a little difficult to start the steering wheel movement, but once the clutch breaks loose it's fine. The idea is to hold the wheel steady so there is no feedback, until enough force is put on it. I thought that would remove the "feel" I wanted, so I went back with the simple rack and pinion you see here.

Old unit on the left, new unit on the right, which uses the plate to mate up with the dashboard.




I thought about modifying the old unit to work with the new rack, but believe me, that would be more difficult than first meets the eye. It would require some serious machine shop work, and I decided against it.

You'll note the hubs are even different, so the old steering wheel won't even fit the new hub. I took care of that with a carefully cast sold epoxy filler piece and steel key, that works great. The old wheel will be used.

From the dashboard there will be little visible difference.

Again, if I didn't have to mess around with all new steering, I would be on the water now.

At least it's a boat project ! The cup is half full !

Paul
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Joined: July 15th, 2005, 8:09 pm

June 19th, 2007, 3:04 pm #93

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






The history of this boat indicates it spent a 25 year glorious run on Lake George, New York. During this time the boat hung in a boathouse each winter. The rear boat hooks sure show the ravages of time, because they were both bent inward, suggesting the two hooks were suspended from a single point aft, rather than on a shaft that had two independent lifting positions directly over top of the hook. As a result, they were bent inward and as you can see, one of them was pulled greatly out of shape.



Failure on that one hook must not have been too far away. That hook, by the way, is not able to be saved for re-use.

The boat takes 3 hooks, two aft, one forward.

After months of searching, I finally found the 3 good hooks you see on the right of the photo on an ebay auction. The seller didn't know if it was for a Century, Correct Craft or a Chris, but they are most certainly for my boat. I got them all for less than the price of rechroming one of the old good ones. These will have to be rechromed for use, and at the going rate, it will be another $50 per unit.

I already have three hooks being chromed now, the two aft ones are not common to the boat, but are from an older vintage Chris Craft, and they look spectacular. I may have to sell those on Ebay if I want to stay original on this boat, which I really should be doing. My chrome is due to be back very soon, so I'll post photos of all that stuff when it arrives.

regards, Paul
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Paul
Paul

June 19th, 2007, 3:13 pm #94

Paul, I love this part of the process. I have been working on a 1936 Gar Wood utility. One of my finds was a flawless 1932 penny...not so unusual, but a reminder that this boat had a long life. I also found a thirties vintage can of unopened motor oil, and strangley about 30 assorted vacuum tubes. I don't know why they were there, but there must have been a bunch of them stored in a box at one time. I found tubes from stem to stern. Bill
Hi Bill,

I guess it's okay for the Executive Director of the Chris Craft Antique Boat Club to be working on a Gar Wood !

Save those vacuum tubes! They're probably worth their weight in gold on the vacuum tube black market, especially in Cuba, lol!

Finding the 1932 penny and a 30's vintage can of oil, that is great stuff!

When I found the "artifacts" in my project boat, I was really taken aback. I went out and put my hand on the boat and gave it a pat as I said "Alfred Goodman" out loud. I think the boat appreciated it. Boats have a soul of sorts, and knowing the history helps in the appreciation factor. Knowing a guy like Alfred Goodman had this boat on Lake George, and knowing his now retired surgeon son learned to water ski behind the boat just adds to the appreciation.

All boats have a history of fun and excitement, and if they could only talk, just think what an interesting tale they would tell! I imgaine they liked some owners more than others. I hope my Sea Skiff likes me, because if there's one thing you do NOT want, it's a vindictive boat!!

Regards,

all the best,

Paul
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Paul

June 19th, 2007, 4:00 pm #95

Well I am finally at the point where I'm assembling the final trim and floor pieces. Everything has been wrapped in vinyl and ready for final securing to the all new substrate. This has been a TOTAL restoration, from the bare glass on the inside, to virtually everything that will be visible outside. The only exceptions will be the gelcoat, which is original. Virtually everything else has been replaced, rechromed, reupholstered, rebuilt, etc.

I had to construct two new side vent ducts tonight, as the one on the starboard side was just too far gone to spend the time to varnish and upholster it. It's a combo of exposed wood and vinyl.

The steering wheel has a new final coat of Wimbledon White, and it will bolt onto the new Teleflex steering pinion and cable.

Here are a few photos from this afternoon. I'm in the re-wire mode now.

-------------------------------------









Looking back at the new rear seat structure with new vinyl front face. Side and center floor pieces are cut new from marine plywood and covered with Nautolex. The entire floor structure on this boat from stem to stern has been replaced and made stronger than new. Dual battery box is installed where the old one had a single battery. Racor fuel filter, new blower, transducer, new transmission, shaft, and all new steering is also hidden under that floor.


Here is a view of the space between the motor and front cockpit. Notice the change in floor elevation. The battery box has been painted in epoxy and it will eventually get a coat of Interlux gray bilge paint. Most of the floor has not been permanently secured yet. It has just been laid down to align Nautolex on all of the individually cut pieces, and to test the alignment of the new floor structure.


Here is a view looking forward. The box assembly on the left is the structure that holds up the double wide passenger seat. It is not secured down yet. A piece of Nautolex covered marine plywood fits over the battery so you can walk from the aft forward to the front seats.
Well here are some before and after photos.

When you look at the “after” photo, you may wonder what took so long........but it won’t reflect all the work that went on under that floor, like motor stringer replacement, fiberglass cross beam reinforcing, and all new floor structure. The “after” photo also won’t reflect the fact that the motor has undergone a running test, has a different carb, new freeze plugs, new transmission, and new risers, to just note a few.




















Regards,

Paul


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June 20th, 2007, 7:12 pm #96

Much of the work includes automobile trips to suppliers, phone calls, coordination, planning, searching records for the right parts, and finding hardware on ebay, etc.

Yes, I found some perfect lifting hooks on ebay a few days ago, after I had some others chromed for $50 apiece! Parts are out there, and you have to be patient, but you can find the stuff if you're patient.

You never seem to have the right stainless steel screws, or enough of them. You run out of bilge paint, epoxy, 3M 5200, etc. It's tough to maintain progress, but the one good thing about spending time working on this project........every time I spend time I get SOMETHING done. The only problem, many of these tasks are not visible, some of them take lots of planning and trips to various support businesses, etc.

The steering, for instance. Has my steering not been frozen beyone all reason, I could probably be on the water now. I had to find a replacement that would fit the dash, finally found the right product, ordered it, but then the rudder assembly wouldn't match up well, and the darn steering wheel wouldn't fit the hub. Its been one small battle at a time, but the good news is........."I love working on a boat". This has been a lot of fun for me, and I'm anxious to get the boat on the water for a shakedown run. This week will have lots of trips to various suppliers getting ready for next week-end. We hope to install the side panels and hook up the final attachment to the rudder this week-end. During the evening this week, I'll be working on the wiring.

regards, Paul
This particular hardware is a full service hardware and not one of the "Home Depot" type stores. Therefore it has things that can be very useful to the Do-It-Yourselfer!

My new Teleflex steering arm coming out of the steering cable has a 3/8" opening for a 3/8" pin or bolt. Only trouble is, the old tiller arm has a hole in it that's bigger.

Amazingly, I found a BRONZE BUSHING that perfectly fits through the bronze tiller arm, with the perfect interior diameter for a (stainless steel) through-bolt. I'll have to grind off some of that bushing, but this is just PERFECT for mating up the two different sizes.



The bushing was $3, the bronze washers were $1.50 each, and less for the stainless steel parts. I got two different through-bolts just to be sure I had one that wouldn't be grinding threads against the internal side of a bushing, etc.

Add gas for that trip, it's another five bucks. Sheesh, no wonder these projects take so long. I'm going to install the bolt with the threaded side down, with two lock nuts jammed against one another. If the steering ever goes out, it won't be because of this part!

Regards,

Paul
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Mercrewser
Mercrewser

June 22nd, 2007, 2:01 pm #97

Well I am finally at the point where I'm assembling the final trim and floor pieces. Everything has been wrapped in vinyl and ready for final securing to the all new substrate. This has been a TOTAL restoration, from the bare glass on the inside, to virtually everything that will be visible outside. The only exceptions will be the gelcoat, which is original. Virtually everything else has been replaced, rechromed, reupholstered, rebuilt, etc.

I had to construct two new side vent ducts tonight, as the one on the starboard side was just too far gone to spend the time to varnish and upholster it. It's a combo of exposed wood and vinyl.

The steering wheel has a new final coat of Wimbledon White, and it will bolt onto the new Teleflex steering pinion and cable.

Here are a few photos from this afternoon. I'm in the re-wire mode now.

-------------------------------------









Looking back at the new rear seat structure with new vinyl front face. Side and center floor pieces are cut new from marine plywood and covered with Nautolex. The entire floor structure on this boat from stem to stern has been replaced and made stronger than new. Dual battery box is installed where the old one had a single battery. Racor fuel filter, new blower, transducer, new transmission, shaft, and all new steering is also hidden under that floor.


Here is a view of the space between the motor and front cockpit. Notice the change in floor elevation. The battery box has been painted in epoxy and it will eventually get a coat of Interlux gray bilge paint. Most of the floor has not been permanently secured yet. It has just been laid down to align Nautolex on all of the individually cut pieces, and to test the alignment of the new floor structure.


Here is a view looking forward. The box assembly on the left is the structure that holds up the double wide passenger seat. It is not secured down yet. A piece of Nautolex covered marine plywood fits over the battery so you can walk from the aft forward to the front seats.
I used their glue and had very bad results. I have to redo it. Fortunately I had only done the gas tank cover as a test. Can you take me through the entire Nautolex install?
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Paul

June 22nd, 2007, 2:31 pm #98

Hi Rickard,

Years ago I didn't have very good results with Nautolex, and I actually used their own glue at the time. I think it was a case of "operator error".

This time I went to my local hardware superstore to see what they had on the shelf, and they had a vinyl floor glue for indoor use, and an outdoor carpet glue. You can guess which one I used.

(Okay, it was the outdoor carpet glue). I was going to use the old plywood flooring because it was there, and because it was still sound for the most part. After looking carefully, I determined it would take as long to clean those up, fill them, patch some spots, etc., as it would to just cut new ones. Since I had a spare sheet of 1/" marine plywood, it was a no brainer for me.

The new pieces got a quick sanding and wipe down, because ANY DEBRIS left will translate into a bump in the final finish, and it's important to wipe the back of the Nautolex too.

I pasted on the glue, and then wiped it back with a glue screed, which is a toothed trowl intended to leave ridges of glue at about 1/8" apart. Then while the glue was still wet (some of it flashes over quickly) I placed the Nautolex down, and pressed it out with a flat piece of wood, pressing all the way down the length of the piece to get the bubbles out and to be sure I didn't have any pockets of glue. After it was nice and tight, I turned the pieces over and ran a line of monel staples down one entire side, and then I pulled the opposite side tight, starting at the center and working out each direction, and stapled those while pulling them tight, just like you would if you were stretching a canvas for an oil painting.

Once everything was stapled up, I put the final pieces on a nice flat floor, Nautolex to Nautolex, so they would press themselves flat while they cured. I put a spare battery on top, and my 30-pound exercise dumbells, etc. to add some weight. The pieces came out looking just fine.



The port and starboard and aft pieces you see in the photo have been removed (they are loose fitted here in the photo) and I am doing the final hook up to the rudder right now, and some final wiring on the aft blower, etc. I plan to have it all buttoned up by the end of the weekend. and it looks like I'll be able to do a water test within the next 14 days.

I'll be working on the remaining two side panels this eve at our lake house, probably have to take time to grill something for dinner, and we'll probably spend a little time on the water too. Otherwise I'll be working on the wiring all weekend long in a final push to get things operational. I am also hooking up a new three way fuel valve, in the anticipation I may experience some of the debris related issues noted by others. This will allow me to immediately switch to another (small) limp-home fuel tank.

Regards, all the best, come see us !

Paul (and Janet)





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July 2nd, 2007, 12:27 am #99

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






Here's a photo of that side trim going in, still have to add the wedge shape trim pieces that direct air to the bilge from the side scoops.



Here is a photo of the original boat, and you can see that side panel in the boat. All the seats LOOK IDENTICAL to this original photo, and will soon be in.



Right now there are lots of small final issues being wrapped up. Fuel line final connections, new belts for water pump (third time to NAPA trying to get a fit), lots of wiring (the last real can of worms).

Regards, Paul
Last edited by FEfinaticP on July 2nd, 2007, 12:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Paul
Paul

July 2nd, 2007, 12:34 am #100

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






I drained my tank today, added more fuel, sloshed it around, drained it again, and never saw the first sign of debris.

I'm optimistic, but not optimistic enough to use the original fuel filter system. I added a nice Racor, similar to what I'm running in my 1956 speedboat.

Here are a few photos. Yes, that's Aviation Form A Gasket on those threads.







You'll note I installed a dual tank switch too, and I did this for two reasons. First, I am concerned about debris clogging the tank outlet tube, so if this becomes a problem, I'll be able to switch to another tank. Secondly, we may be taking trips with ACBS like the Tennessee River Cruise, and those may require an additional tank. So while things were out and apart, in goes the dual switch just to have it ready.

Regards,

Paul
Last edited by FEfinaticP on July 2nd, 2007, 4:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
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