Paul
Paul

June 5th, 2007, 2:11 pm #81

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






Well things have been a little slow lately, too many other distractions this time of year. The good news is, at least I can work outside without freezing this time of yoear! Sure beats freezing under a piece of 6-mil poly.

The flooring (and entire supportive floor structure, screwed, painted, and boned with 3M 5200) is installed, with a nice looking Nautolex (light weathered teak color) plank vinyl.

The first piece of vinyl trim is in place too. Side floor pieces along the length of the port and starboard hull are newly cut from marine plywood and covered with Nautolex, wrapped around the edges and stapled with monel staples. When the vinyl goes down onto the adhesive, it is very important that the surface of the substrate be smooth, otherwise it will telegraph through the vinyl and look bad. You have to also be careful to smooth out all ripples, etc. with a straight piece of wood, etc. Once tightly adhered, the pices were turned over, and stretched again like doing a canvas for an oil painting. Once tightly stretched and glued, these were placed face to face on the floor with lots of weight placed on top for a couple days until things cure out.

Upholstery pieces are now ready to pop in. The rear structure around the gas tank is totally out, reinforced, painted, partially covered with vinyl, and reinstalled. I am installing a Racor fuel filter with a switch capability for dual tanks, to avoid the sediment situation I may encounter with the old tank. This is just a precaution to get me home in the event we're stranded 20 miles out.

New bilge pumps are in, new blower, already got the transducer installed. Shaft is nicely aligned with the motor now. New fanbelts.

The instruments will be going in shortly during the rewire phase.

It's taken me a while to get this boat ready, but fortunately things are nearly done. My chrome is all out now at the shop, so I'll be ready when it returns.

Photos will be posted of this work in a couple days, stay tuned.

Regards, Paul
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Paul
Paul

June 5th, 2007, 2:21 pm #82

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






I would love to paint the bottom of this boat copper bronze. I think the color combination would look great with a white stripe and the green hull.

However, I have learned that restraint must be exercised when the urge to crack a can of paint comes around. Too many people have not resisted this urge, and I decided to stay the course with the original gelcoat.

After all, it's lasted 41 years so far with no blisters, and it's an oddity now!
Here are some photos of the boat as it arrived in Nashville late last year. Yes, that's bare gelcoat, no blisters, and if it lasted that long without paint, I guess I'm going to keep it original.





This last photo (below) was taken in upstate New York, just south of Lake Ontario before the boat was acquired. Note the trailer has not been repainted in this photo. I have to compliment the previous owner, that trailer refurbish was a good one, it looks almost new now with nice paint and new rollers.


Needless to say, I'm getting very anxious to see what this one will do on the water. The hull with that deep-V and high freeboard, was undoubtedly designed for the Great Lakes. Here in Tennessee it should be happy with just about any kind of weather we'll get on the inland waterways and local lakes. We get whitecaps when the wind kicks up, but nothing like the big lakes.

Regards, Paul
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Paul
Paul

June 11th, 2007, 6:20 pm #83

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






This week-end, between running out to Cedar Creek Yacht club for a meeting, mowing a couple acres on a MF 135 (and doing some repair work), running a weedeater until I ran out of string, I actually got some work done on the Skiff Project.

My rear structure is back in place around the fuel tank, around the work I did on the rudder (new steering assembly back there), a new transducer, and new blower. Rear foot traffic will be on new floor structure back there, running along side port and starboard, and new battery box, and an entire new structure forward. All of this is like painting a car, the prep takes forever. The floor on this boat is not all on the same plane, the forward cockpit is depressed lower than the rest of the boat, and this makes things more difficult to match everything up.

I have all the engine stuff back in order, well it's not totally re-wired yet, but I'm about ready to do the final deed and put the newly cut and covered nautolex flooring down. Everything is ready. Side panels and all the flooring will pop in during the course of an afternoon.

My windshield and instruments will go in and they we'll do the water test. I plan on posting an entire series of photos on the restoration of that windshield. Sheesh, that was a big project in itself.

Don't tell anyone, but I have three different colors of 3M-5200 on this boat, but it's all covered with the Interlux gray bilge paint, lol. Janet asked me why it is taking so long, and after I explained the impact of a steady stream of visitors, parties, and other obligations like holding a job, mowing the yard, maintaining a cruiser in the water and a fleet of cars, I also mentioned I'm doing it right. Rather than slap it together and get on the water, I'm fixing EVERYTHING the right way once, never to do it again. I also explained, that all of the floor structure is designed to be easily unbolted in the future and come out in big sections, in the event we ever have to do an engine swap. Rather than fasten everything down permanently, it's very secure with all of the critical pieces bondec, but not bonded permanently to the hull so it can't be pulled out for service. Everything is painted too.

Yes, we're planning on keeping this boat in the family for quite a few years. The more I see and hear about this hull, the more I like it.


Regards, Paul

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Paul
Paul

June 18th, 2007, 4:09 am #84

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






Well I am finally at the point where I'm assembling the final trim and floor pieces. Everything has been wrapped in vinyl and ready for final securing to the all new substrate. This has been a TOTAL restoration, from the bare glass on the inside, to virtually everything that will be visible outside. The only exceptions will be the gelcoat, which is original. Virtually everything else has been replaced, rechromed, reupholstered, rebuilt, etc.

I had to construct two new side vent ducts tonight, as the one on the starboard side was just too far gone to spend the time to varnish and upholster it. It's a combo of exposed wood and vinyl.

The steering wheel has a new final coat of Wimbledon White, and it will bolt onto the new Teleflex steering pinion and cable.

Here are a few photos from this afternoon. I'm in the re-wire mode now.

-------------------------------------









Looking back at the new rear seat structure with new vinyl front face. Side and center floor pieces are cut new from marine plywood and covered with Nautolex. The entire floor structure on this boat from stem to stern has been replaced and made stronger than new. Dual battery box is installed where the old one had a single battery. Racor fuel filter, new blower, transducer, new transmission, shaft, and all new steering is also hidden under that floor.


Here is a view of the space between the motor and front cockpit. Notice the change in floor elevation. The battery box has been painted in epoxy and it will eventually get a coat of Interlux gray bilge paint. Most of the floor has not been permanently secured yet. It has just been laid down to align Nautolex on all of the individually cut pieces, and to test the alignment of the new floor structure.


Here is a view looking forward. The box assembly on the left is the structure that holds up the double wide passenger seat. It is not secured down yet. A piece of Nautolex covered marine plywood fits over the battery so you can walk from the aft forward to the front seats.
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Rickard
Rickard

June 18th, 2007, 3:30 pm #85

Hi Paul

It´s looking awesome, you got a new boat! I like the Nautolex, it gives the boat a nice classic look. Looking forward to more pictures.

Regards

Rickard
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Paul
Paul

June 18th, 2007, 3:52 pm #86

Much of the work includes automobile trips to suppliers, phone calls, coordination, planning, searching records for the right parts, and finding hardware on ebay, etc.

Yes, I found some perfect lifting hooks on ebay a few days ago, after I had some others chromed for $50 apiece! Parts are out there, and you have to be patient, but you can find the stuff if you're patient.

You never seem to have the right stainless steel screws, or enough of them. You run out of bilge paint, epoxy, 3M 5200, etc. It's tough to maintain progress, but the one good thing about spending time working on this project........every time I spend time I get SOMETHING done. The only problem, many of these tasks are not visible, some of them take lots of planning and trips to various support businesses, etc.

The steering, for instance. Has my steering not been frozen beyone all reason, I could probably be on the water now. I had to find a replacement that would fit the dash, finally found the right product, ordered it, but then the rudder assembly wouldn't match up well, and the darn steering wheel wouldn't fit the hub. Its been one small battle at a time, but the good news is........."I love working on a boat". This has been a lot of fun for me, and I'm anxious to get the boat on the water for a shakedown run. This week will have lots of trips to various suppliers getting ready for next week-end. We hope to install the side panels and hook up the final attachment to the rudder this week-end. During the evening this week, I'll be working on the wiring.

regards, Paul

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Rickard
Rickard

June 18th, 2007, 6:00 pm #87

Hi Paul

It´s the planning, finding the right parts and shopping tours that takes up most of the time. But it was fun to see the photos, starting to look like a new boat now. I think that boat will look amazing once you are finished.

Regards

Rickard
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Paul
Paul

June 18th, 2007, 7:07 pm #88

I just got back from a lunchtime trip to the hardware store, to pick up two very small stainless steel cotter keys. Without them, I couldn't keep the transmission cable and throttle cable in place. They were 17-cents apiece, but it probably took me $5 worth of gas to drive out and find them, and an hours of time spent.

The good news is........I found this particular super nice hardware store also has bronze bushings of various sizes, and I will need one of those to make the smaller diameter hole in the drive rod off my new steering mate up with the larger diamerter hole in the rudder itself. I'll use a stainless steel bolt through the smaller hole, and a bronze bushing to make up the difference. Just one of many joys of changing out the steering mechanism.

Hey the cup is half full !



Paul

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Tom Slayton
Tom Slayton

June 18th, 2007, 7:17 pm #89

Some people, whether it be cars or boats, just scoff at the price of a restoration because they can go out and find a junker with paint holding the rust together for less money. They expect the restorer, whether it's a shop or an enthusiast, to give their labor away.

As a result, many of the restorations are priced so far out of reason they can't be sold, or the price is lowered down to a level where it is competitive, in which case the buyer generally gets a real deal.

For instance, look at the cost of a frame off 1957 Chevrolet, compared to one that is a survivor with a fresh coat of paint. They may generally look the same, but one will cost 10X the price of the other.

I keep thinking about the 38 Express Warren Pateman restored. You'll never find a boat that had that kind of cash and loving attention paid, and the buyer probably got the thing for 55-cents on the dollar compared to what the boat was really worth in time and cash.

Your comments about all the coordination time it takes to do a project rang true. I'm in the middle of a kitchen project right now at home, and oooohhh boy. Everyone at the local hardware store knows me by first name.

Tom
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Bill Basler
Bill Basler

June 19th, 2007, 3:33 am #90

I like your take on the "custodian of care" philosophy. I also am fascinated by some of these old boats, and wonder what kind of tales they would tell if they could talk.

Interesting read, thanks for posting the story.

JB
Paul, I love this part of the process. I have been working on a 1936 Gar Wood utility. One of my finds was a flawless 1932 penny...not so unusual, but a reminder that this boat had a long life. I also found a thirties vintage can of unopened motor oil, and strangley about 30 assorted vacuum tubes. I don't know why they were there, but there must have been a bunch of them stored in a box at one time. I found tubes from stem to stern. Bill
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