Paul
Paul

May 16th, 2007, 10:57 pm #71

Very simple, real wood, good looking, almost original look, but much nicer. Whats not to like about it?

Tom
I'm hoping the dashboard doesn't look so much better that it looks out of place. The old style authentic instruments will help a lot. So will the 100% authentic interior.

Regards, thanks for the good words,

Paul
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Rickard
Rickard

May 17th, 2007, 10:35 pm #72

I'm looking forward to seeing the photos too, ha!

Believe me, I've enjoyed the project tremendously and the boat is going to get lots of action, but I'm ready to start playing and just about ready to stop working!

Stay tuned ! In the next couple of weeks there will be a huge amount of work coming together. I am going to get lots of photos of this one on the water too.

With gas prices hitting records here in the US, smaller boats make a lot of sense. We’ll run the 38 Commander over a couple 50 or 75 mile runs this season, but the Skiff is going to be getting the water skiing and breakfast runs! There is a place on Old Hickory, Gallatin Marina, that serves great breakfasts. Arriving by boat is the only way to go! If any of my local buddies are reading this from central Tennessee, Gallatin Marina is no secret!

Regards, thanks for the encouragement,

Paul
Here is another one:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1965-Chr ... 3312QQrdZ1

Regards

Rickard
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Paul
Paul

May 17th, 2007, 10:59 pm #73

It's possible to restore that boat to showroom condition, but..............I can tell you just about everything that will have to be done! First of all, where it's been and for what it's been used for, better check those engine stringers.

Secondly, I'll check that serial number, becuase 1965 is a VERY early example of this hull ! It has the same dash and steering wheel, and everything looks basically identical to my 1966, but it has the very odd traditional chrome center stick gear selector, rather than the updated Morse single stalk. This is a very unusual find. The engine of course, is not original.

Nice find!

Paul
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Paul
Paul

May 20th, 2007, 3:13 am #74

First, here is a link to the thread "first look inside", showing what the boat looked like when it arrived in Nashville, after being shipped from the south shore of Lake Ontario.http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1162070768



This boat was built in the Cortland, New York, Chris Craft Corsair Division's plant, where the 19' Commander Super Sport and 23' Commander were built two years later. 70 were built in 1966, and 10 in 1967.


Well today I can announce that all the vinyl covered panels, all flooring, all interior trim of any kind, the gear selector, steering wheel, steering system, gauges, are out of the boat. It's basically a bare hull with lots of stuff inside now that needs to be cleaned up. I plan to take a pressure washer and shop vac to it tomorrow, but for today all the major disassembly is done.

The motor runs, the new (old) transmission is here, along with four spare exhaust logs and a couple risers.

The gear selector is from MORSE, and it's a good unit, but heavily pitted. I'm going to have it restored and replated instead of using a new one. The funky steering wheel is going to be powder coated and reused too. Gauges have been sent off for restoration.

I am quite amazed at the sheet after sheet of vinyl plywood that has come out of this thing! Two layers of side panels, one to line the inside of the long ski storage pocket, and they extend all the way to the bow of the boat. Numerous other fit and finish pieces, all wrapped with vinyl. Just looking at all those copper staples, now I know I must buy an electric staple gun for this project, because I don't think my hands will survive a million concussions with the old mechanical style. Since so much of this boat is flatwork, I plan to do that because it's so easy to do. I'll do that in my shop during the coldest weather of the season, and I'll be out in my "boat capsule" when weather will permit. The reassembly process should be very fast and rewarding.

Yes, I've purchased one of those (Cortland) New York boats built in the Finger Lake region, so the two guys who are most likely to see another one are Bill and Tom, because I don't think there would be too many of these that ever got south of the Mason Dixon line, and fewer that would still be on the water today. Our goal when finished, is to have "an original 1966 condition 20' fiberglass Chris Craft Sea Skiff" to dock along side our 1966 38 Commander. If the restoration is good enough, I'll be taking this one to the Mt. Dora 2008 boat show. The ACBS recognizes any boat of 1968 or older as a "Modern Classic" and I suspect there will be a lot of pretty informed boaters down there who have never even seen one of these low production boats. Most people would fail the test when asked "did Chris Craft ever build a fiberglass Sea Skiff". The correct answer is "yes"

I am very impressed with the integrity and sensible construction used on this boat. It is VERY STRONG, and it is built EXACTLY like the Commander series. It has transverse and longitudinal hollow fiberglass box beams, just like a Commander. There is NO WOOD that comes in contact with water. The engine stringers are wood, but they are free standing heavy timber pieces that span from fiberglass to fiberglass.

Encapsulated marine plywood has been bonded to the inner wall of the fiberglass hull with polyester fiberglassed straps, to serve as a medium to screw into and hold those vinyl finish panels. They all look perfectly preserved.

The windshield has to come off in order to get the minor pitting out of the aluminum frame. The upholstry (seats) will be a pretty easy job, and it will have to match the motor box (which is presently intact, but needing a top and needing a through going over to tighten everything up.

I'm not sure if the motor will have to come out at this point or not. I was optimistic when I got it started, but the freeze plugs are steel and rusted out(the 327 block is an automotive transplant) and they are darn near impossible to get at because the motor mounts are in the way. The new Paragon transmission is a beast, and it won't fit onto the motor without the motor being lifted, so it looks like I'm in for a weekend of wrestling with some big iron. Not sure just how that's going to be done, but rest assured, "it will be done".

Janet spent the day at the lake house with her family, and she said early this morning, "you have to work on the boat today". I smiled when I heard that, and I asked her to repeat it so I could savor the moment, ha !

I'll post some photos later this eve when I get a chance to upload them.

Regards, Paul



After a year of restoration work, part time here and there, this is the almost end result. The windshield isn't installed yet, but as you can see, she's a runner! I discovered the motor is actually an automotive block, with higher compression than the 8.0:1 Chris Craft 327F, this one has 8.5:1 and the lowest power rating for that motor was 250-hp. This boat will FLY !!


Here are more brochures
http://www.network54.com/Forum/424840/m ... 1170963414

Here's what one sounds like (mine being test run while on the trailer)







July 2009 UPDATE: New Videos and Photos ! The boat is running great, and gets compliments where-ever we go. I have yet to compound out the hull and get the Chris Craft script rechromed.

Quiet morning July of 2009, birds were chirping, then the 327F was fired up.
Turn up your speakers for this one, even though it's a small block, it is a BEAST !










Here she is July 2009 at speed on the Cumberland, in front of Alan Jackson's fish camp.






As you can see, I have more than a slight misalignment here, but nothing has been done yet to align anything after the engine was reset on the new reinforced stringers and risers/manifolds re-installed. The new shaft bearing was installed along with the new shaft. New section of exhaust hose was used for the transition from the packing gland to the hull. 1/4" teflon packing was used. The hub was reconditioned by grinding the perimeter to remove all the old hammer marks. Now I'll go ahead and align the motor, which I don't anticipate being much of a problem.



All of the structure around the gas tank was removed and painted, and reinforced where necessary. Front floor structure (all new) was reinstalled today.

regards,

Paul
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Paul
Paul

May 20th, 2007, 3:22 am #75

Janet is in Kentucky so I just worked on the boat all day long. It was sort of relaxing to hang out with the canines this afternoon. That's Leo the alpha dog always on alert, along the Tasha (left) and Tia (right). Nothing moves up on our ridgetop without these guys knowing about it. We normally have four, but we lost Terri the Terror recently have not found another. Dalmatians need a lot of exercise in order to be this laid back. Great watchdogs, by the way!



The one on the left (Tasha) was recently caught phoning in a credit card order to West Marine. We had to give her a talking to!

Regards,
Paul
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Rickard
Rickard

May 20th, 2007, 7:24 pm #76

As you can see, I have more than a slight misalignment here, but nothing has been done yet to align anything after the engine was reset on the new reinforced stringers and risers/manifolds re-installed. The new shaft bearing was installed along with the new shaft. New section of exhaust hose was used for the transition from the packing gland to the hull. 1/4" teflon packing was used. The hub was reconditioned by grinding the perimeter to remove all the old hammer marks. Now I'll go ahead and align the motor, which I don't anticipate being much of a problem.



All of the structure around the gas tank was removed and painted, and reinforced where necessary. Front floor structure (all new) was reinstalled today.

regards,

Paul
Hi Paul

What size prop do you have on that boat? I have a 15x17 on my boat but I don't think that prop is the original one.

Regards

Rickard
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Paul
Paul

May 21st, 2007, 1:42 pm #77

Hi Rickard,

I'm not sure what prop is the factory spec, but a 13 x 13 was in the boat at the time it arrived here in Nashville. The HF7D Paragon is a direct drive unit, so the rpm of the prop would be the same as the engine speed. With 210-hp and a 13 x 13 spinning at 4000 rpm that equates to an unrealistic 49-mph in theory without slippage, take out 15% slippage for this particular deep v hull and that results in a realistic 41-mph speed with that prop.

Factory speed ratings were published at 38-mph with the 210-hp 327F and 36-mph with the 283 185-hp. Since this boat has a higher compression block than the original 8.0:1 of the stock 327F and the minimum power for that compression was 250-hp, I also have a cupped 13 x 14 speed prop I'm going to try. I think it's possible to get a little more speed, but clearly this is not a speed hull due to the deep V, it's a soft ride hull. Because of the additional wetted area of a deep v compared to a generally flat bottom design, the deep v always takes more power to reach a given speed (increased drag). I don't know the true power of this boat due to the fact that it has a higher compression automotive block. If power is in the 250-hp range, I may be able to exceed 45-mph with that 13 x 14 cupped prop. Otherwise it may just serve as a comfortable mid range cruising prop. For water skiing I'll probably stick with the 13 x 13.

The interesting thing is, a deep v is frequently the faster boat because of conditions. In anything more than a mild chop, my 1950s speedboats have to throttle down or pound. In conditions like this a deep v will just blast right on by.

If you can give me the weight, power, gear reduction, and prop, I'll run some calculations for you just to see what they say.

Regards,
Paul
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Rickard
Rickard

May 21st, 2007, 7:41 pm #78

Hi Paul

I don´t think that the engien is original since the prop is beigger than the shaft. The prop has a plastic inlay (I think nylon) to make it fit.

When I read the papers that I got from the mariners museum the original prop seems to have the article numer 3212 and on the sales material it has the article number 23-32-75. Otherwise it just says that the propeller is a three blade.

The weight is 3700 lbs, the power is 235 hp at 4200 rpm and the reduction gear is 1.5:1

Regards

Rickard
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Paul
Paul

May 21st, 2007, 8:55 pm #79

The 3212 prop is apparently a 13" diameter with a 11" pitch. That doesn't make sense to me.

WIth 1.5:1 gear reduction your shaft speed is 2800 at 4200-rpm engine speed. This equates to 2566 feet of forward movement in the period of a minute, or 29-mph without slippage calculated. With a reduction of approximately 15% for slippage on the deep V hull, speed would be in the 25-mph range. Therefore it's my conclusion the 13 x 11 3212 prop is wrong for the boat.

The 15 x 17 running at 2800 rpm shaft speed would result in a 45-mph speed, less 4.75 mph for slippage, giving a speed of around 38-mph, which sounds a whole lot more like it. Personally I don't like those propeller sleeves. You might keep that one as a spare, and look for a good one on ebay that precisely fits your shaft.

Regards, Paul



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Rickard
Rickard

May 21st, 2007, 10:10 pm #80

Hi

Thank you for the calculation! I am going to install a GPS so I will report back after the first testdrive. My goal is to have the boat in water in the beginning of next week.

Regards

Rickard
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